Author Topic: Cascade and Chinook Terroir  (Read 3080 times)

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19824
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2017, 06:21:52 PM »
Hop growers say Centennial is one of the most difficult breeds they grow and if they could get rid of it they would. 

Interesting. My Centennial bines seem as prolific as my Cascade bines. Both are vigorous for me. I had not heard of problems with Centennial before.

This is interesting to me, because my cascades are my worst growers followed by CTZ. My centennials grow really well. My best grower is chinook. It's like gang busters! I live in NE Ohio.

I'm in Sandusky OH and centennial were my best out of cascade, ctz, and crystal.  For the amount of effort, I did not care for hop growing.  Aphids, weeds, oh my!

Yeah, I grew Cascade for about 12-14 years before deciding it was more trouble than it was worth and tore them out.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline pete b

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3123
  • Barre, Ma
    • View Profile
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #31 on: April 25, 2017, 06:33:19 PM »
Hop growers say Centennial is one of the most difficult breeds they grow and if they could get rid of it they would. 

Interesting. My Centennial bines seem as prolific as my Cascade bines. Both are vigorous for me. I had not heard of problems with Centennial before.

This is interesting to me, because my cascades are my worst growers followed by CTZ. My centennials grow really well. My best grower is chinook. It's like gang busters! I live in NE Ohio.

I'm in Sandusky OH and centennial were my best out of cascade, ctz, and crystal.  For the amount of effort, I did not care for hop growing.  Aphids, weeds, oh my!

Yeah, I grew Cascade for about 12-14 years before deciding it was more trouble than it was worth and tore them out.
I actually find them trouble free once established. I mulch, prune, and feed in spring and feed a couple times over the summer and harvest when ready. I would think ripping them out and dismantling the trellises would be more work than its worth given that they are attractive plants even if you didn't bother harvesting.
Don't let the bastards cheer you up.

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19824
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #32 on: April 25, 2017, 06:56:06 PM »
I actually find them trouble free once established. I mulch, prune, and feed in spring and feed a couple times over the summer and harvest when ready. I would think ripping them out and dismantling the trellises would be more work than its worth given that they are attractive plants even if you didn't bother harvesting.

Yeah, growing them is easy.  It was the processing and packaging I hated.  I'd get up to 25 lb. from a single plant and it was just to much hassle.  And I didn't trellis..just grew them up a deer fence and across the top.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline chumley

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 978
    • View Profile
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #33 on: April 25, 2017, 07:58:38 PM »
I actually find them trouble free once established. I mulch, prune, and feed in spring and feed a couple times over the summer and harvest when ready. I would think ripping them out and dismantling the trellises would be more work than its worth given that they are attractive plants even if you didn't bother harvesting.

Yeah, growing them is easy.  It was the processing and packaging I hated.  I'd get up to 25 lb. from a single plant and it was just to much hassle.  And I didn't trellis..just grew them up a deer fence and across the top.

I actually like this part.  There is nothing like a fine September day, coming home tired from grouse hunting, to go snip and take down the vines, then sit back in a lawn chair, pouring myself a homebrew, and sit there mindlessly picking hops.  Hey, I am sitting around outside drinking beer and doing something!

Processing is easy.  I just put the plastic tub with the hops into my garage, turn them over by hand for a couple of days, then vacuum seal them up.

What I dislike are all the people I know who grow hops, who don't brew, and want to give me their hops.  People will give me ziplocs full of old yellow hops past their prime, that I know spent a good deal of time picking them.  No!  I don't want your hops, the hops you don't even know what variety they are!  I grow all the hops I need, and order the rest!

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 19824
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #34 on: April 25, 2017, 09:10:21 PM »
I actually like this part.  There is nothing like a fine September day, coming home tired from grouse hunting, to go snip and take down the vines, then sit back in a lawn chair, pouring myself a homebrew, and sit there mindlessly picking hops.  Hey, I am sitting around outside drinking beer and doing something!

Processing is easy.  I just put the plastic tub with the hops into my garage, turn them over by hand for a couple of days, then vacuum seal them up.

What I dislike are all the people I know who grow hops, who don't brew, and want to give me their hops.  People will give me ziplocs full of old yellow hops past their prime, that I know spent a good deal of time picking them.  No!  I don't want your hops, the hops you don't even know what variety they are!  I grow all the hops I need, and order the rest!

My situation was different.  Since I grew them on a deer fence, they intertwined and I couldn't take the whole bine down.  I had to pick them cone by cone.  Also, both by experience and by education, I found they needed to be dried as soon as possible.  So I'd pick as many as I could fit into my food dehydrator, dry them, package them the next day, then pick, dry and package more and keep repeating the process.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline b-hoppy

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
    • View Profile
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #35 on: April 26, 2017, 05:21:18 PM »
This all makes me wonder besides weather and location what type of soil amendments could radically affect the hop smells and flavor profile?

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk
I'm interested in this too. Hopefully someone less lazy than me does the research and posts. :D

If you're interested in soil amendments only, home research will probably be the only way you'll find out.  Farmers certainly understand that soil health is at the top of the list when it comes to producing a healthy crop, but serious soil amendment at production scale is an enormous task that generally doesn't happen on a grand scale. 

Larger growers generally reserve their best land to high value crops like apples, wine grapes and hops and work with what they have. 

Here is an article that concurs with what was posted earlier: http://msue.anr.msu.edu/uploads/234/78934/7._Post-Harvest_Quality_Control_Zac_German.pdf

Offline zwiller

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 570
    • View Profile
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #36 on: April 26, 2017, 06:15:10 PM »
Maybe it's time for us to stop kidding ourselves and grow hops hydro indoors.  Hint: halide for vegetative and HPS for flowering  ;D
Sam
Sandusky, OH

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6229
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #37 on: April 26, 2017, 11:49:25 PM »
Maybe it's time for us to stop kidding ourselves and grow hops hydro indoors.  Hint: halide for vegetative and HPS for flowering  ;D
You kid, but the thought has crossed my mind in the past. Imagine a bar/brewpub/tasting room that managed to grow hops indoors under grow lights - especially if they found a way to trellis them across the ceiling. That would be one hell of a cool decor.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #38 on: April 27, 2017, 12:01:21 AM »
Maybe it's time for us to stop kidding ourselves and grow hops hydro indoors.  Hint: halide for vegetative and HPS for flowering  ;D
You kid, but the thought has crossed my mind in the past. Imagine a bar/brewpub/tasting room that managed to grow hops indoors under grow lights - especially if they found a way to trellis them across the ceiling. That would be one hell of a cool decor.


Could make for some interesting house character/terroir. Maybe. The place would smell great !
Jon H.

Offline b-hoppy

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 162
    • View Profile
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #39 on: April 27, 2017, 03:15:59 AM »
Maybe it's time for us to stop kidding ourselves and grow hops hydro indoors.  Hint: halide for vegetative and HPS for flowering  ;D

There's more than a few folks trying it and are finding quite a few issues.  I've never had anyone get back to me about vernalization so I know that's a big one.  I guess they'll keep trying as long as it's other peoples $$ they're using, haha.  http://www.coloradoan.com/story/life/food/2016/07/01/csu-professor-pioneers-fast-growing-hops/86599646/

Offline PharmBrewer

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 109
  • Homebrewing Pharmacist
    • View Profile
    • Havencrest Home Brewery
Re: Cascade and Chinook Terroir
« Reply #40 on: April 30, 2017, 01:53:19 AM »
Maybe it's time for us to stop kidding ourselves and grow hops hydro indoors.  Hint: halide for vegetative and HPS for flowering  ;D

There's more than a few folks trying it and are finding quite a few issues.  I've never had anyone get back to me about vernalization so I know that's a big one.  I guess they'll keep trying as long as it's other peoples $$ they're using, haha.  http://www.coloradoan.com/story/life/food/2016/07/01/csu-professor-pioneers-fast-growing-hops/86599646/
That is a great article.

Sent from my Pixel XL using Tapatalk

Jim
Havencrest Home Brewery - 5 Liter/BIAB
Member: Beaverton Homebrew Club, Oregon Mainbrew Guild, AHA
"Chance favors the prepared mind" - Blaise Pascal