Author Topic: Historic Kentucky Common  (Read 1617 times)

Offline JJeffers09

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Historic Kentucky Common
« on: April 20, 2017, 08:25:54 AM »
Can we talk early 1900s?  I need some knowledgeable info, or a reliable sources.  For homebrew day I am thinking of brewing a short turnover brew.

Is this a Kentucky beer inspired by kolsch but with a big 30%+ corn and 6row?

Crystals probably never used, but roasts maybe?

Noble hops from the German brewers or Early American?

I feel like I had a very similar thread about a year ago, I think about the velvet brew.  This ale I'm thinking is along the same lines as champagne velvet with an kolsch/cream ale twist.  That's the inspiration anyway.

Someone help school me, because I know next to nothing about this brew.

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Offline GS

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2017, 08:28:48 AM »
The July/August 2013 issue of Zymurgy features Kentucky Common.

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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2017, 08:43:48 AM »
It's like a red cream ale.  Personally reminds me of an English bitter as well, with not so much caramel though.
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Offline coolman26

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2017, 08:45:01 AM »
Kentucky Common in my mind had the color of Amber Bock. You can search and find a Louisville brewer, Leah Dienes @ Apocalypse Brew Works. She is an authority on Ky Common and its history.


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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2017, 08:47:36 AM »
It's like a red cream ale.  Personally reminds me of an English bitter as well, with not so much caramel though.
You think they used Crystal malts?  I have read it used high amount of corn and cheap 6 row.  What color range? Should I go brilliant red like 14-15srm?  The irish red I make is brilliantly red.  I may stay in that range.

Would sticking with an ol' faithful 2row corn and roast work? Maybe a touch of Simpson's Crystal but not more than 3-5%??

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Offline coolman26

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2017, 08:56:30 AM »
I didn't think there was any crystal. If you look on the web I saw Leah and her research. It had the recipes posted from back then.


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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2017, 09:03:28 AM »
I didn't think there was any crystal. If you look on the web I saw Leah and her research. It had the recipes posted from back then.


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Dienes will bring Apocalypse's Kentucky Common, which she said has a slight caramel flavor, with a light body and crisp finish. It was brewed according to a 1912 recipe found in former Oertel's Brewing Company brew logs that had ended up with a member of the LAGERS Homebrew Club.

I just found this in a Google search.  Idk of any way to obtain caramel flavor without Crystal.  I definitely don't want the sour cream ale thing.

Calling out to LAGERS HBC... What's the recipe?? That would be an amazing share...

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Offline coolman26

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2017, 09:09:14 AM »
http://www.bjcp.org/docs/NHC2014-kycommon.pdf


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Offline goschman

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2017, 09:25:07 AM »
http://www.bjcp.org/docs/2015_Guidelines_Beer.pdf

Characteristic Ingredients:
Six-row barley malt was used with 35% corn grits to dilute the excessive protein levels along with 1 to 2% each caramel and black malt. Native American hops, usually about .2 pounds per barrel of Western hops for
bittering and a similar amount of New York hops (such as Clusters) for flavor (15 minutes prior to knock out). Imported continental Saazer-type hops (.1 pounds per barrel) were added at knock out for aroma. Water in the Louisville area was typically moderate to high in carbonates. Mash water was often pre-boiled to precipitate the carbonate and Gypsum was commonly added. Considering the time from mash in to kegging for delivery was typically 6 to 8 days, clearly aggressive top-fermenting yeasts was used.
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2017, 11:37:36 AM »
Great info so far.  Thanks guys.  Anyone else have an idea or tried and true recipe I am all ears.

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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2017, 12:17:53 PM »
First run of recipe

1.050 OG
29.2IBUs
14.8SRM
4.8% ABV

60.2% 6-row
36.1% Flaked Corn
2.4% Carafa III
1.2% Crystal 30L

Hops
24.4IBUs Northern Brewer - 60m
4.8IBUs Perle - 10m

Okay, now I am considering the water profile...
Amber Balanced
70ppm Calcium
7ppm Magnesium
38ppm Sodium
90ppm Sulfate
81ppm Chloride
-93 Bicarbonate
1.10 SO4/Cl

Lactic Acid to drop to 5.2 is ~0.2707mL/L mash water
That works up to about 12.3mL and that is a lot more than I am used to.

Yeast - undecided.
Of the standard ale strains I have on hand to build up are:
001/051/080/US05/1098/1450
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2017, 02:11:06 PM »
It's like a red cream ale.  Personally reminds me of an English bitter as well, with not so much caramel though.

FWIW, many British brewers used corn in their beers back before WWI. It's only after that point that invert sugar became the primary adjunct.

Take that, corn adjuncts =/= craft believers. I wish corn would lose the stigma, it's fantastic if used properly.
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Offline JJeffers09

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2017, 02:12:49 PM »
It's like a red cream ale.  Personally reminds me of an English bitter as well, with not so much caramel though.

FWIW, many British brewers used corn in their beers back before WWI. It's only after that point that invert sugar became the primary adjunct.

Take that, corn adjuncts =/= craft believers. I wish corn would lose the stigma, it's fantastic if used properly.
Yes.  But it's a tricky if...

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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2017, 02:33:07 PM »
I feel that it's a stigma, much like diacetyl. It's OK if someone doesn't like corn flavor, but I really wish more brewers would experiment with corn.

The issue with corn, much like diacetyl, is the average craft beer snob snubs it because that's what they've been trained to do.
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Offline stpug

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Re: Historic Kentucky Common
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2017, 03:19:32 PM »
I feel that it's a stigma, much like diacetyl. It's OK if someone doesn't like corn flavor, but I really wish more brewers would experiment with corn.

The issue with corn, much like diacetyl, is the average craft beer snob snubs it because that's what they've been trained to do.

4 out of 4 beers I have on tap right now have corn ranging from 9-33%.  The stigma is lost on me :D
I like corn in beer, corn on the cob, corn in mac&cheese, corn in taco meat, creamed corn, corny jokes.... well, you get the idea  ;D