Author Topic: Welding Information.  (Read 6417 times)

Offline beerocd

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #30 on: June 27, 2010, 08:15:10 PM »
Yeah, my MIG is theoretically capable of doing aluminum as well, I just haven't tried it. I have my doubts as to how well it'll work. Gotta flip the direction of the current, I think you can really only do it with 240v welders (could be wrong there) and few other odd things. However, I want to get a TIG regardless :)

Nope, the 120 too. Just swap 2 wires, the kit, the bottle. Not saying I know it works for sure, but that's the way my manual reads. I'll know for sure sometime in July - gonna give it a go.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #31 on: June 27, 2010, 08:41:00 PM »
The thing with the TIG on aluminum is you have to have a welding power source that can provide high frequency AC current. A synchronized wave system works best but Lincoln provides a less expensive square wave machine that works well.

You will get a usable aluminum weld out of the little mig machines but it wont be pretty. Another problem is that the welding wire is so soft that it constantly "birdnests" binds slightly and then bunches up at the rollers. Its a real pita. You always have to make sure the line to your welding gun is straight. If it is curved or rolled over the wire will bind. Sometimes finding a separate little spool gun to plug into your machine works better for Mig on aluminum rather than feeding a spool from the machine.

Esab makes a great aluminum mig machine. It uses pulsed wave technology and the machine has feed spools that are synchronized with little internal pull wheels in the gun. Runs beautifully! Looks almost as nice as TIG welds.

Look for "push pull" gun set ups for MIG welding aluminum.
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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2010, 06:17:56 PM »
Here, this explains the push pull equipment.

http://www.lincolnelectric.com/knowledge/articles/content/feedingaluminum.asp

Looks like a nice machine. I have to find one for Miller machines.
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Offline brew_dog

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #33 on: July 07, 2010, 04:16:46 PM »
I was also looking at some of the harbor freight rigs to get started. Would something of this caliber be sufficient for the types of welding a typical brew geek would need to do?

110A, 220V

http://www.harborfreight.com/welding/mig-flux-welders/110-amp-220-volt-flux-and-mig-welder-94164.html

The price is the attractive point on that one, but it seems the next category up is about double the price:

160A, 230V

http://www.harborfreight.com/welding/mig-flux-welders/230-volt-160-amp-mig-and-flux-welder-93793.html

I suppose outside of these, I'd be looking at a Lincoln 140, though I'd like to invest minimally just to make sure welding is right for me.

Thanks for any suggestions!

Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #34 on: July 08, 2010, 06:58:50 PM »
Those welders would work for getting a brew stand built provided you make it out of steel. For the smaller lowr amperage models you have to keep your steel at 1/8 thickness. For example: if you are making your stand out of 2" sq. tube make sure it has no more than 1/8" wall thickness (plenty strong). With the larger machines you will be able to weld thicker stuff, maybe up to a half inch.

I cant really vogue for the quality of these machines, I know others that use them without much problem but never have for my self.

At Harbor Freight it can be kind of a crap shoot.

The only problem with the mig is going to be welding SS. You will no doubt get a very ugly weld that is contaminated and crystallized. Their is an advanced technique that is called "drip transfer" it involves welding SS at high amps (temps) and lower wire speed with the mig. The idea is that the metal will drip ot kinda spray. Wit a steady hand and a little "c" motion in the drag and you will get a nice looking ss weld. Not as good as TIG but nice.

As you may know, you can put just about any ss weld on your kettles cause sanitary isnt really an issue. But welding SS on fermentation equipment is very tough. Welds have to be damn near perfect.  
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Offline beerocd

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #35 on: July 24, 2010, 08:34:35 PM »
Cap,
using square tube, say you're making a rectangle... would you 45 the corners or finish it otherwise? I'm sure you could weld a piece in to close off the tube - just not sure if one way is stronger than the other. And maybe there's no point to it anyway other than keeping out the occasional spider. Just wanted to know how you do it..

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Offline capozzoli

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Re: Welding Information.
« Reply #36 on: July 25, 2010, 11:30:07 AM »
If it is furniture or something I cut forty fives on the pieces to be joined at a 90.

If it is something that needs to be real structural like a gate that has to carry itself cantilevered I use straight cuts.

I put the horizontal ontop of the verticals sorta like columns and headers. Then I cap the open end of tube and weld. you can usually find flat stock that will fit inside the tube leaving a small enough gap to fill with weld.

This works well when you are going to grind the welds off too.

Beer, its whats for dinner.

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