Author Topic: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle  (Read 960 times)

Offline Omar

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Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« on: May 23, 2017, 05:27:04 PM »
I have a bottle conditioned beer that is showing very little carbonation 2 weeks after bottling. It was fermented with the flocculant wyeast 1968 so I'm guessing the yeast is just comfortable being lazy at the bottom instead of eating the priming sugar. It's currently sitting at 68f, which is an appropriate temperature. Now normally I would just let it sit another 2-3 weeks, but I need to ship this beer no later than Friday in order for it to arrive in time for a certain upcoming competition ;) Can I safely swirl the bottles to wake the yeast up? How much should I be concerned about oxidation, assuming the shipped beer will be evaluated in just 3 weeks? Thanks for any and all advice!

Offline syncopadence

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Re: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2017, 07:12:55 PM »
How did you add the priming sugar, and how much? OG and FG? I never like to shake after bottle conditioning, as you may stress the yeast. Maybe try shaking a few, and adding a little bit of fresh yeast to a few other ones. In either case, hopefully the yeast would scavenge any oxygen you have in there.

Offline denny

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Re: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2017, 07:18:58 PM »
How did you add the priming sugar, and how much? OG and FG? I never like to shake after bottle conditioning, as you may stress the yeast. Maybe try shaking a few, and adding a little bit of fresh yeast to a few other ones. In either case, hopefully the yeast would scavenge any oxygen you have in there.

I'm curious to know how shaking a bottle will stress the yeast.  To the OP, go ahead and shake.  It's not gonna be a problem.
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Offline syncopadence

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Re: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2017, 07:26:28 PM »
How did you add the priming sugar, and how much? OG and FG? I never like to shake after bottle conditioning, as you may stress the yeast. Maybe try shaking a few, and adding a little bit of fresh yeast to a few other ones. In either case, hopefully the yeast would scavenge any oxygen you have in there.

I'm curious to know how shaking a bottle will stress the yeast.  To the OP, go ahead and shake.  It's not gonna be a problem.
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Offline Omar

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Re: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2017, 07:41:07 PM »
How did you add the priming sugar, and how much? OG and FG? I never like to shake after bottle conditioning, as you may stress the yeast. Maybe try shaking a few, and adding a little bit of fresh yeast to a few other ones. In either case, hopefully the yeast would scavenge any oxygen you have in there.

I'm curious to know how shaking a bottle will stress the yeast.  To the OP, go ahead and shake.  It's not gonna be a problem.

Thanks, denny!

Offline Lazy Ant Brewing

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Re: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« Reply #5 on: May 24, 2017, 01:40:19 PM »
"Inverted, not stirred."

In the winter, I keep my house pretty cool. Every other day, I take my bottles  one at a time out of the cardboard case, turn them upside down and replace.

 I keep them in a small utility room  that also contains the hot water heater, washer and dryer; so they get some small amount of additional heat and some additional vibration.

No-one that I have shared them with has ever mentioned oxidation.
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Oxidation risk from rousing yeast in the bottle
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2017, 05:55:50 PM »
How did you add the priming sugar, and how much? OG and FG? I never like to shake after bottle conditioning, as you may stress the yeast. Maybe try shaking a few, and adding a little bit of fresh yeast to a few other ones. In either case, hopefully the yeast would scavenge any oxygen you have in there.

I'm curious to know how shaking a bottle will stress the yeast.  To the OP, go ahead and shake.  It's not gonna be a problem.

And while in transit any bottles that you ship will get some pretty rough treatment.
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