Author Topic: Kitchen Knives  (Read 18780 times)

Offline onthekeg

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #45 on: January 08, 2011, 01:38:27 PM »
Also, wood cutting boards are generally better since the bacteria will dry out in the board and die.  On plastic or other boards there may be moisture in the cuts that will allow the bacteria to stay viable.  Also to add to what Mark mentioned, having different color boards is the best to ensure you don't use a board that cut raw meat when you happen to slice up a salad.

Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #46 on: April 07, 2011, 12:15:03 PM »
My wife was using the chef's knife about a month ago and [...] we had to go get the angled edge chemically cauterized to stop the bleeding.

Martin Yan says to curl your fingers, not extend, etc etc, or else you make a mistake and you will not have a finger.

He was not joking.  It was funny but he was not joking.

Offline bluefoxicy

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2011, 12:26:02 PM »

 I;ve got a bambo cutting board. What's the difference between that and a Boos board? Should I set my bambo board on fire, and replace it?  :-\

Some have told me bamboo is too hard (damage the knife), some have told me it's just fine.  Teak is considered the best; I'm looking at a 2 inch thick endgrain Proteak 16x12 board for my large, to replace plastic composite my parents bought me when I moved out (which I have always hated, since day one).  Every few years when the damage gets extensive enough that the scratches and gashes don't just heal shut upon getting wet, I'll plane an eighth inch off and buff it smooth, and there you go.

That is, of course, a $75 cutting board.  The fact that I can resurface it (it does NOT have a juice channel, something I specifically selected against!) is my major buying decision.  I have a  pattern of paying slightly more than reasonable prices for one-time purchases, and indulging myself in luxury in that way:  a $40 pine Hangiri that'll crack and dry in 1-2 years (and never work well anyway) vs $100 for the same thing in resin-rich cypress (that'll last for a lifetime).  Of course I have access to a planer, orbital sander, etc.  You don't want to go spending $100 on a cutting board and then every 2 years find someone you can pay $40 to resurface it for you, that's just stupid.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #48 on: April 07, 2011, 12:41:22 PM »
If you're in Chicago, this is a great place for butcher block cutting boards: http://www.yelp.com/biz/a-butcher-block-factory-outlet-chicago

You're buying from the factory and the price for a monster end-grain board is phenomenal.  I'm still using the one I bought in 1994.  A little love and occasional oil and my kids can use it when I die.

PLUS, you're steps from the old Schoenhoff Brewery which is defunct but the buildings are still there.  I was told ages ago there's an old artesian well on-site.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2011, 12:43:32 PM by Joe Dunne »
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Offline brewmichigan

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #49 on: April 12, 2011, 12:27:40 PM »
I like my henckels and just had them sharpened - wow, what a difference!


I have some Henckels, which I like, and they need to be sharpened. I hone them every time I use them now to help hold the edge but I can see some tiny dings in the blade. Where should I look to get them sharpened? I'm not even sure where to start.
Mike --- Flint, Michigan

Offline tumarkin

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #50 on: April 12, 2011, 12:35:19 PM »
I'd suggest that you buy a compound (two-sided) stone and learn to sharpen them yourself. It's not that difficult, and there are lots of videos and how-tos on the web. If you'd prefer to get it done, call some of the kitchen specialty shops in your area or look under knife sharpening. Warning - they certainly don't all do a good job, so if you can get recommendations from friends that might be a good place to start.
Mark Tumarkin
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Gainesville, FL

Offline euge

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #51 on: April 12, 2011, 01:29:34 PM »
The aluminum oxide stone I have cost about $8 at the Asian market by my house. Was quite easy to pick up the technique of sharpening. Look on YouTube for examples.

My understanding is that having them done can run a much as $10 a blade. Forget that. 
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #52 on: April 12, 2011, 01:40:23 PM »
I like my henckels and just had them sharpened - wow, what a difference!


I have some Henckels, which I like, and they need to be sharpened. I hone them every time I use them now to help hold the edge but I can see some tiny dings in the blade. Where should I look to get them sharpened? I'm not even sure where to start.
My local grocery store has a drop-off / pick-up day every couple of weeks.  The guy who sharpens them takes them to his shop, sharpens them, and brings them back the next day.  I can recommend him if you're in Redmond WA, but I have no idea if a similar service elsewhere would do as good of a job.
Tom Schmidlin

Offline denny

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #53 on: April 12, 2011, 01:44:11 PM »
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #54 on: May 09, 2011, 05:30:07 AM »
I'm learning to use water stones, one paring knife I had was so dull I went back to my old Arkansas stones to get it in shape for the water stones.

I just remodeled our kitchen so after years of cheap knives decided to invest some money. I got some Henckels Pro S and they are nice, but a bit on the heavy side. I also found a neat site, http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/ and purchased a knive from them. It is a 170mm Santuko from Ryusen and is Tsuchime Damascus (basically hammered damascus). It is a beauty and I have NEVER seen a knife so sharp. It sliced through paper as if it were air.



The odd thing was the shipping was direct from Japan and I had the knife two days later. Shipping from them is $7 no matter what you order, but of course nothing is inexpensive. Care has to be taken since most of their knives do not have a 50/50 bevel. It remains to be seen if I will be able to sharpen the knife correctly when the time comes.
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Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #55 on: May 14, 2011, 04:27:23 PM »
New knife arrived today, Sakura damascus. Took forever to get here from Israel, but the knife is made in Japan and is a beauty.


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Offline euge

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #56 on: May 14, 2011, 06:53:23 PM »
Japan by way of Isreal? Nice knife dude. Looks like a double bevel edge?
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

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Offline MDixon

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #57 on: May 15, 2011, 04:30:44 AM »
Actually the Sakura and the Ryusen are both 50/50 and both are so sharp it is ridiculous. The blades are really thin on both as well. I'll probably try to stay in that world as much as possible as I build the collection. I'm really digging having some neat knives to play with. With the damascus you have to immediate dry the knife after washing to avoid any rust.

I think the guy in Israel has Sakura make them for him. I'm no expert on Japanese knives, but I think Sakura generally makes more pocket and utility knives. Often the knives from one Japanese company are forged by another.
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Offline thirsty

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #58 on: May 15, 2011, 05:41:20 AM »
I just use an old Cutco for almost everything and a poplar cutting board I made myself. Sharpening a knife yourself is not that hard,  as said above, the web is full of how to videos. There's a good one out there of a guy who sharpens his knife and then shaves off his beard with it.

Offline euge

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Re: Kitchen Knives
« Reply #59 on: May 15, 2011, 07:58:48 AM »
Both of those knives are very attractive and right up my alley. Already thinking of Christmas and any presents I might want. ;)
The first principle is that you must not fool yourself, and you are the easiest person to fool. -Richard P. Feynman

Be Sure To Vote Jonathan Fuller for Governing Committee!