Author Topic: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review  (Read 984 times)

Big Monk

  • Guest
We have revised the "Methods of the Low Oxygen Brewhouse" paper and put together an update and review of the current state of the methods here:

http://www.lowoxygenbrewing.com/brewing-methods/low-oxygen-review/
« Last Edit: July 06, 2017, 01:39:51 PM by Big Monk »

Offline bjanat

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 52
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2017, 02:04:25 PM »
Great stuff, thanks

Offline HoosierBrew

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 13030
  • Indianapolis,IN
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2017, 02:35:07 PM »
Good stuff!
Jon H.

Offline dmtaylor

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3262
  • Two Rivers, WI
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2017, 02:47:07 PM »
I sincerely take back anything unfair I ever said about low oxygen brewing.  I haven't tried it yet, and admittedly maybe never will in entirety, but I have to admit I'm now headed in this direction in an effort to improve my homebrew.  Thanks for the link to this useful summarized information.  I'm going to try to incorporate much of it in my next few batches and see what happens.  It's just... now so much of the information seems to make sense to my stubborn mind.

Plus, I love good German-style lagers, so...
« Last Edit: July 06, 2017, 02:49:39 PM by dmtaylor »
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline hoprod

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2017, 04:38:53 PM »
The use of sauergut as an O2 scavenger in the mash is an intriguing new addition.  How are you going about working that into mash pH adjustments (I apologize if this was covered and I missed it)?  Only thing I can think of off the top of my head is to assume 2% total acid content of the sauergut and find a way to work that into water calculations. 

Offline The Beerery

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1509
  • More you know, the more you know you don't know!
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2017, 04:45:25 PM »
The use of sauergut as an O2 scavenger in the mash is an intriguing new addition.  How are you going about working that into mash pH adjustments (I apologize if this was covered and I missed it)?  Only thing I can think of off the top of my head is to assume 2% total acid content of the sauergut and find a way to work that into water calculations.

We built a calculator into our spreadsheet specifically for this. However using a program like Brunwater just chose lactic and and put in your titrated % amount or guess. If the SG is fresh and recently made (less than a week) use about .8-1% for acid strength.
Herr, wirf Hirn vom Himmel!
(Oder Steine, Hauptsache er trifft.)
Check us out at www.lowoxygenbrewing.com (Now with forums)
"Consistently successful brewers are invariably the ones who operate low oxygen systems." -George Fix Circa 1999
Taplist and Fermentation Cellar
"Progress is impossible without change, and those who cannot change their minds cannot change"

Offline hoprod

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 14
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2017, 04:53:02 PM »
The use of sauergut as an O2 scavenger in the mash is an intriguing new addition.  How are you going about working that into mash pH adjustments (I apologize if this was covered and I missed it)?  Only thing I can think of off the top of my head is to assume 2% total acid content of the sauergut and find a way to work that into water calculations.

We built a calculator into our spreadsheet specifically for this. However using a program like Brunwater just chose lactic and and put in your titrated % amount or guess. If the SG is fresh and recently made (less than a week) use about .8-1% for acid strength.

I see it in the spreadsheet now.  For whatever reason, the text was whited out in the version I just downloaded. :)

Offline Pricelessbrewing

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 173
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2017, 05:30:04 PM »
I'm very happy you've kept making progress in what's needed and what was "LODO dogma" has simplified and clarified from the original "mandate" statements if you will. Keep up the good work, and I'm sure it will continue gaining ground as more explore what is needed.

 I'm not ready to start doing it quite yet, but I'm more open minded to the idea of it now, due in part to the approaches and statements made by some brewers I respect that are unrelated to the LODO team. Maybe after I move again and have an established brew station

Offline ynotbrusum

  • I spend way too much time on the AHA forum
  • ********
  • Posts: 2805
  • Da mihi sis cerevisiam.
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2017, 06:05:36 PM »
For those who haven't jumped to the sauergut reactor level, what difference or effect do you folks suspect would be achieved/lost by using acidulated malt in the mash (along with a lower dose trifecta or daily double - i.e., just no AA) to obtain the proper pH for the mash (I note the absence from the boil addition of sauergut, of course).  I have been using the acid malt for a variety of reasons, but principally to avoid higher dosing with other salts or acids.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Big Monk

  • Guest
The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2017, 06:17:04 PM »
For those who haven't jumped to the sauergut reactor level, what difference or effect do you folks suspect would be achieved/lost by using acidulated malt in the mash (along with a lower dose trifecta or daily double - i.e., just no AA) to obtain the proper pH for the mash (I note the absence from the boil addition of sauergut, of course).  I have been using the acid malt for a variety of reasons, but principally to avoid higher dosing with other salts or acids.

You just need to be careful with Sauermalz. I have a batch right now that is super potent, for example, I have the strength setting on 2.3 to compensate.

Sauermalz is the closest to Sauergut with using Sauergut.

Offline brewinhard

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3225
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2017, 06:20:41 PM »
For those who haven't jumped to the sauergut reactor level, what difference or effect do you folks suspect would be achieved/lost by using acidulated malt in the mash (along with a lower dose trifecta or daily double - i.e., just no AA) to obtain the proper pH for the mash (I note the absence from the boil addition of sauergut, of course).  I have been using the acid malt for a variety of reasons, but principally to avoid higher dosing with other salts or acids.

As I understand it, sauergut is best...then second best is acidulated malt (to still achieve some of those flavor nuances in the finished product).



Offline brewinhard

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3225
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #11 on: July 07, 2017, 06:22:43 PM »
I sincerely take back anything unfair I ever said about low oxygen brewing.  I haven't tried it yet, and admittedly maybe never will in entirety, but I have to admit I'm now headed in this direction in an effort to improve my homebrew.  Thanks for the link to this useful summarized information.  I'm going to try to incorporate much of it in my next few batches and see what happens.  It's just... now so much of the information seems to make sense to my stubborn mind.

Plus, I love good German-style lagers, so...

I brew ALL styles of beer and have seen excellent results with the low oxygen process. For one, my malt aromas and flavors are fresher and longer lasting than before. No more slight stale note I used to pick up in some of my normal process beers. And a typical low oxygen brew day only takes me 5.5 hrs (basically as long as my normal other brewdays).

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1693
  • Southern Maryland
    • View Profile
Re: The State of Low Oxygen Brewing: On Progress, Updates and Review
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2017, 02:55:31 AM »
Is there any sort of timeline for how quickly hot break needs to be removed before it impacts the batch? I've always got some that gets past the whirlpool, and my planned double drop fermentation setup was envisioned to help with this. (With the added benefit of also eliminating the cold break material.)
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.