Author Topic: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A  (Read 2382 times)

Offline zigs6

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WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« on: July 18, 2017, 10:47:21 AM »
Sooooo many questions about Sacch Trois as I will be using it for the first time on my upcoming fruited sour.

1. Pitching rate: It's going into a kettle sour after some lacto souring and it will be the primary fermenter. Since this strain is already well suited for an acidic environment, do I really need to pitch more cells than I would an ale strain? For example, I usually do a lager pitch for a kettle sour if I'm using something like US-05.

2. Making a starter: Do I treat this more like a sacch starter or a brett starter? It will have 100b cells in the new packaging so I'm sure multi steps won't be necessary but will the starter still need about a week or will a few days do the trick. Afterwards would decanting be the best? I'm reading it doesn't settle easily so I'm thinking it would need to be in the fridge for a while.

3. I have all clean beer equipment. I clean and sanitize well but this still makes me nervous. It's not Brett but it's unlike any Sacch strain. Will my gear get infected? I'm reading it's pretty safe to work with but I'm still a little freaked out.

Does anyone have any experience in dealing with the above?
Thanks

Offline mchrispen

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Re: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« Reply #1 on: July 18, 2017, 02:00:28 PM »
I would treat it like a normal yeast. I have had a lot of luck using it in secondary after French Saison in primary. That plus some fruit makes an amazing fruited beer. It will not go "sour" (at least in the common sense of a sour beer) unless you also pitch lacto or kettle sour. In my experience, it will dry the beer out below 1.000 so be prepared. This does allow you to pitch a ton of fruit.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2017, 02:49:07 PM »
I would make a starter and pitch like you would any typical sacc strain. You could pitch a little higher if you want.

For sanitation I would be more cautious. Thoroughly clean and then sanitize with either iodophor or bleach. (Starsan is less effective against yeast.) If going the bleach route use 1 tbsp/gallon cold water. Soak 20 minutes, rinse, fill with hot water and half a crushed campden tablet for 20 minutes. Rinse with hot water and air dry. This is the process I use for all my equipment that touches brett or LAB, including plastic, with no problems.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2017, 05:06:54 PM »
I would treat it like a normal yeast. I have had a lot of luck using it in secondary after French Saison in primary. That plus some fruit makes an amazing fruited beer. It will not go "sour" (at least in the common sense of a sour beer) unless you also pitch lacto or kettle sour. In my experience, it will dry the beer out below 1.000 so be prepared. This does allow you to pitch a ton of fruit.
Interesting. I have had zero luck using this yeast in secondary with 3711. But this was back when they were still calling it Brett, so it could be that my expectations were off. I was shooting for fruited and dry hopped Brett saisons, but never got any further flavor development once I pitched the Trois.

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Offline kramerog

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Re: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« Reply #4 on: July 18, 2017, 05:11:05 PM »
At the risk of hijacking this thread, what styles are good for sacc trois?

Offline zigs6

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Re: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« Reply #5 on: July 18, 2017, 06:51:13 PM »
Beersmith says I will finish at 1.003. My main questions are on pitching rate due to the low PH wort and the starter settle time.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 07:43:37 PM by zigs6 »

Offline zigs6

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Re: WLP 644 Sach Trois Q and A
« Reply #6 on: July 19, 2017, 08:37:20 AM »
I decided to write White Labs and I got all of this answered for those who were curious:

Hi Zachary,
 
I’ve address each question below:
 
Pitching rate: It's going into a kettle sour after some lacto souring and it will be the primary fermenter. Since this strain is already well suited for an acidic environment, do I really need to pitch more cells than I would an ale strain? For example, I usually do a lager pitch for a kettle sour if I'm using something like US-05.
 
Depends on your PH. If it’s below 3, you will need to up your pitch rate some to accommodate the additional acidity.

2. Making a starter: Do I treat this more like a sacch starter or a brett starter? It will have 100b cells in the new packaging so I'm sure multi steps won't be necessary but will the starter still need about a week or will a few days do the trick. Afterwards would decanting be the best? I'm reading it doesn't settle easily so I'm thinking it would need to be in the fridge for a while.
 
The starter will happen as quickly as any other sacch strain, so don’t plan a week! A single step over a day or two will be perfect.

3. I have all clean beer equipment. I clean and sanitize well but this still makes me nervous. It's not Brett but it's unlike any Sacch strain. Will my gear get infected? I'm reading it's pretty safe to work with but I'm still a little freaked out.
 
                This is pure Sacch, so no need to worry about contamination. Just standard sanitation measures will keep you perfectly safe!