Author Topic: Oktoberfest!  (Read 10851 times)

Offline bluesman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #15 on: July 30, 2010, 07:45:52 AM »
I'm always saddened when I hear that someone hasn't seen that movie. 

ok, seriously, what movie??

Blazing Saddles.
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Offline blatz

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #16 on: July 30, 2010, 07:49:45 AM »
I'm always saddened when I hear that someone hasn't seen that movie. 

ok, seriously, what movie??

Blazing Saddles.

oh, yeah - its been a long, long time since I saw that.  doh!
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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #17 on: July 30, 2010, 10:10:08 AM »
The 16-day party attracts over 6 million people every year who consume 1.5 million gallons of beer

That was what wikipedia said too... does the average Oktoberfest-goer really only have one Maß the entire time? I mean, granted, some of those 6 million are kids, but still. ONE beer?!
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #18 on: July 30, 2010, 11:47:44 AM »
Beer or bier served at Oktoberfest and in Bavarian Bier halls and restaurants usually come in two sizes: "Large" and "Oh...my...God!".

The Bavarian Maßkrug is pronounced 'moss kroogh'.  It is made of double-walled dimpled glass, weighs in at around 2 lbs empty and holds one liter of beer. That's 33.8 oz or just under 3 American bottles. The glass extends about two inches above the liter line however to leave room for the head. Contrary to the "American pour", German Beers are poured with a good sized head. This actually releases the aroma of the Beer which is vital to taste!

Anyone know of a good place to get some of these fine Maßkrugs?

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Offline tygo

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« Last Edit: July 30, 2010, 06:57:35 PM by tygo »
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Fermenting: Wit
On Tap: Lucifer's Hammer Golden Strong Ale, Dopplebock, Old Fuzzynut's Ale

Offline bluesman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2010, 05:33:44 AM »
Thanks for the links.

The strength of a Marzen is FAIRLY consistent amongst the German and American examples. It is running between 5 - 7% ABV
There are quite a few at 5.8ish% which is where I like to brew them.

I don't speak German but I can see that the strength is 5.9% from the Spaten website.

Spaten Oktoberfestbier
Unser Spaten Oktoberfestbier wird schon im Frühjahr für das größte Volksfest der Welt gebraut. Unzählige Oktoberfestbesucher sind von diesem Bier jedes Jahr aufs Neue begeistert. Denn jeder Schluck ist mit seinem unverkennbar süffigen Geschmack so besonders wie die Wiesn selbst.

Geschmack: malzbetont, süffig, leichte Süße, körperreich und leichte Hopfenbittere
Blume: malzblumig
Aussehen: bernstein, blank
Stammwürze in Prozent: > 13,7
Alkohol in Prozent: 5,9
 

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #21 on: July 31, 2010, 09:42:03 AM »
I've always gone pretty traditional with my Oktoberfest, but I think I'm going to switch it up a little this year.  Here's what I'm going to brew next weekend.  Unfortunately, I don't have much fermentation temp control right now, so it will be an ale version using 1056.

Oktoberfest
3-B Oktoberfest/Märzen

Size: 5.16 gal
Efficiency: 80.0%
Attenuation: 77.0%
Calories: 195.54 kcal per 12.0 fl oz

Original Gravity: 1.059 (1.050 - 1.056)
Terminal Gravity: 1.014 (1.012 - 1.016)
Color: 10.92 (7.0 - 14.0)
Alcohol: 5.95% (4.8% - 5.7%)
Bitterness: 27.0 (20.0 - 28.0)

Ingredients:
6 lb Vienna Malt
2 lb Light Munich
2 lb Pilsner Malt
1.0 lb Dark Munich
.12 lb Melanoidin Malt
.50 oz Magnum (12.1%) - added during boil, boiled 60 min
.50 oz Hallertau (3.6%) - added during boil, boiled 15 min
1.0 ea Whirlfloc Tablets (Irish moss) - added during boil, boiled 5 min
1.5 L WYeast 1056 American Ale

Notes
Single infusion batch sparge
-Mash @ 155
-Ferment @ 64
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #22 on: July 31, 2010, 10:24:05 AM »
Looks like a good one!

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Offline beersk

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #23 on: August 02, 2010, 08:12:51 AM »
I did my O-fest with wyeast 1007 this weekend.  I found out that my floating thermometer is way off; something like 10 degrees wamer than what it actually is.  Argh!  I don't think I'll be using that anymore.  So I'm not actually sure what my real mash temp was...it was under 150F, but it's fermenting like a fox right now.  Had to attach a blow off tube.
Can't wait to try it.  But I only got about 70% efficiency :(  thinking that may be from the low mash temp, even though I mashed for 90minutes.  I think it will still be solid with an OG of 1.056.  
« Last Edit: August 02, 2010, 10:59:41 AM by beersk »
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Jesse

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2010, 08:23:34 AM »
I have noticed a significant difference in American vs. German examples of this beer.  There is that German "distinct taste" that is present in the German examples but not any of the American examples.  I think that "distinct taste" comes from the flavor hops but I have yet to duplicate it.

Here's the BJCP guidelines.

3B. Oktoberfest/Märzen

Aroma: Rich German malt aroma (of Vienna and/or Munich malt).  A light to moderate toasted malt aroma is often present.  Clean lager aroma with no fruity esters or diacetyl.  No hop aroma.  Caramel aroma is inappropriate.

Appearance: Dark gold to deep orange-red color. Bright clarity, with solid, off-white, foam stand.

Flavor: Initial malty sweetness, but finish is moderately dry.  Distinctive and complex maltiness often includes a toasted aspect.  Hop bitterness is moderate, and noble hop flavor is low to none. Balance is toward malt, though the finish is not sweet.  Noticeable caramel or roasted flavors are inappropriate.  Clean lager character with no diacetyl or fruity esters.

Mouthfeel: Medium body, with a creamy texture and medium carbonation.  Smooth.  Fully fermented, without a cloying finish.

Overall Impression: Smooth, clean, and rather rich, with a depth of malt character.  This is one of the classic malty styles, with a maltiness that is often described as soft, complex, and elegant but never cloying.

History: Origin is credited to Gabriel Sedlmayr, based on an adaptation of the Vienna style developed by Anton Dreher around 1840, shortly after lager yeast was first isolated.  Typically brewed in the spring, signaling the end of the traditional brewing season and stored in cold caves or cellars during the warm summer months.  Served in autumn amidst traditional celebrations.

Comments: Domestic German versions tend to be golden, like a strong Pils-dominated Helles.  Export German versions are typically orange-amber in color, and have a distinctive toasty malt character.  German beer tax law limits the OG of the style at 14˚P since it is a vollbier, although American versions can be stronger.  “Fest” type beers are special occasion beers that are usually stronger than their everyday counterparts.

Ingredients: Grist varies, although German Vienna malt is often the backbone of the grain bill, with some Munich malt, Pils malt, and possibly some crystal malt. All malt should derive from the finest quality two-row barley. Continental hops, especially noble varieties, are most authentic.  Somewhat alkaline water (up to 300 PPM), with significant carbonate content is welcome.  A decoction mash can help develop the rich malt profile.

Vital Statistics:   OG:   1.050 – 1.057
IBUs:   20 – 28   FG:   1.012 – 1.016
SRM:   7 – 14   ABV:   4.8 – 5.7%

Commercial Examples: Paulaner Oktoberfest, Ayinger Oktoberfest-Märzen, Hacker-Pschorr Original Oktoberfest, Hofbräu Oktoberfest, Victory Festbier, Great Lakes Oktoberfest, Spaten Oktoberfest, Capital Oktoberfest, Gordon Biersch Märzen, Goose Island Oktoberfest, Samuel Adams Oktoberfest (a bit unusual in its late hopping)

Ron Price

Offline bluesman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #25 on: August 02, 2010, 08:30:46 AM »
I didn't my O-fest with wyeast 1007 this weekend.  I found out that my floating thermometer is way off; something like 10 degrees wamer than what it actually is.  Argh!  I don't think I'll be using that anymore.  So I'm not actually sure what my real mash temp was...it was under 150F, but it's fermenting like a fox right now.  Had to attach a blow off tube.
Can't wait to try it.  But I only got about 70% efficiency :(  thinking that may be from the low mash temp, even though I mashed for 90minutes.  I think it will still be solid with an OG of 1.056. 

Well hopefully it will be OK. 

Sounds like a good sign it's fermenting.  I think the 90 minute mash will work in your favor.

Good Luck!
Ron Price

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #26 on: August 02, 2010, 10:29:20 AM »
Ron, I think I know what you're referring to when you describe German examples as having a distinct taste. I perceive it as a clean, mineral-like bite that I think might have something to do with water composition. It could have something to do with hops also.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #27 on: August 02, 2010, 10:40:26 AM »
Ron, I think I know what you're referring to when you describe German examples as having a distinct taste. I perceive it as a clean, mineral-like bite that I think might have something to do with water composition. It could have something to do with hops also.

Matt, There has been some discussion about this issue.  I am leaning towards hops and water profile as well.  I want to look at hops first as you'll see when I post my recipe from my other computer.  

Here is a link to another thread that debates this very issue.

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=1812.0

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #28 on: August 02, 2010, 12:09:28 PM »
Thanks for posting that link!  Good info.
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Offline redbeerman

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Re: Oktoberfest!
« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2010, 04:27:03 AM »
Ron and I have been trying to replicate that elusive "taste" or flavor profile for a few years.  I have found (advice from Kai) that splitting the IBUs bewtween bittering and flavor 50/50 gets you close.  Proper aging (not necessarily at low lager temps but at cellar/serving temps) may bring out this character as well.  I have found that most south German lagers exhibit this flavor profile, with bocks being a little less so and helles, pils and Marzen more so.  Have not seen it in Kolsch or alt styles.  Export styles may or may not have it, but to a much lesser degree than south German beers.  As has been said, water compostion is key as well.
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