Author Topic: malt mill  (Read 1277 times)

Offline Slowbrew

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2330
  • The Slowly Losing IT Brewery in Urbandale, IA
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #15 on: October 11, 2017, 12:42:20 PM »
On my BC you can actually see the wear on the rollers.  What used to be sharp, pointed pyramids are all flattened and dull.  I had it rebuilt just 2 years before which was disappointing.

I gave up on the BC and replaced it with a 3 roller Monster Mill which I have only used once.  It gave me issues but I'm still figuring out how to adjust a 3 roller mill.  Someday the addition/kitchen remodel will be done and I'll be able to brew again.

For simplicity, if I replaced it again I'd stick with a 2 roller mill.

IMHO
YMMV

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline mainebrewer

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 372
  • Palermo, Maine
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2017, 03:27:45 AM »
On my BC you can actually see the wear on the rollers.  What used to be sharp, pointed pyramids are all flattened and dull.  I had it rebuilt just 2 years before which was disappointing.
Yeah, the knurling on my BC is clearly quite worn after getting it re-built a little over two years ago.
BJCP Certified

Offline brewsumore

  • Brewmaster
  • *****
  • Posts: 597
  • Spokane, WA
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #17 on: October 23, 2017, 09:43:28 PM »
A few years ago I too gave up on my BC.  I really like my Monster Mill 3:2.  It makes fast work of even 30 lbs of malt, and gives reliable performance.

Offline Hooper

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 237
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #18 on: November 08, 2017, 05:58:26 PM »
My BC stopped feeding first try at my new Denver location. My solution that appears to work for 2 grinds now is...I open the rollers almost double what I normally crush. I run the grain through that no problem...then I put the rollers back to the original gap and run through again...I will probably have to upgrade some day...but this is working for me for now...
“Stay with the beer. Beer is continuous blood. A continuous lover.”
—   Charles Bukowski

Offline smkranz

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 258
  • Maryland
    • View Profile
    • Midnight Homebrewers' League
Re: malt mill
« Reply #19 on: November 08, 2017, 06:58:50 PM »
I've owned my BC for a long time, almost since they came out.  Hundreds of 5 and 10 gallon batches of beer later, it just still works.  I have the gap set fairly wide, just barley enough to crack the kernels (I look for kernels that look whole with husks intact, but when you pick them up they break apart).  It is powered by an 18v DeWalt cordless drill.  I tend to avoid milling at the drill's highest speed.  I've honestly not even looked at the knurl on the rollers, but I do check the uniformity of each crush after about the first half pound, and it's always the same.

Guess I'm one of the lucky ones.
Steve K.
AHA • BJCP
Midnight Homebrewers' League
http://www.midnighthomebrewers.org

Offline el_capitan

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #20 on: November 08, 2017, 07:13:51 PM »
Are you by chance using a drill? My thoroughly unscientific opinion is that most problems with homebrew mills are caused by bushing wear through misalignment.

I don't use a drill. I run the mill with a direct drive motor connected with a spider.

My JSP is set up the same way.  High torque, low RPM.  Takes a bit longer to crush, but it does a great job.  I have the adjustable JSP and it's in excellent condition, 10+ years and about 175 batches later. 

Offline davidw

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 73
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2017, 01:37:48 PM »
Non-adjustable JSP Maltmill, 20+ years, 400+ batches, still going strong. I even try and remember to put a couple drops of 3:1 oil on the bushings every year (or two) ..
"The intriguing situation about brewing, on the other hand, is that mechanisms are theoretically possible, and the real key to success is the ability to identify those that are genuinely relevant in any particular situation."

~ George Fix : Introduction, Principles of Brewing Science

Offline Visor

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 257
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2017, 04:50:13 PM »
   I'm about ready to hunk my friggin JSP mill, it keeps throwing the rubber O-ring that drives the second roller, unless I crush at a wider gap than I want. Without the O-ring it requires almost twice the torque that it does with the ring in place. What's the point of an adjustable mill if you have to stop to dismantle and repair it 2 or 3 times every grind. What a PITA!
I spent most of my money on beer, tools and guns, the rest I foolishly squandered on stupid stuff!

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 18643
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: malt mill
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2017, 09:42:45 AM »
   I'm about ready to hunk my friggin JSP mill, it keeps throwing the rubber O-ring that drives the second roller, unless I crush at a wider gap than I want. Without the O-ring it requires almost twice the torque that it does with the ring in place. What's the point of an adjustable mill if you have to stop to dismantle and repair it 2 or 3 times every grind. What a PITA!

My O ring went 15 years ago and it didn't affect a thing.  I keep the gap as narrow as it will go and have no trouble at all.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline Wilbur

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2017, 03:21:13 PM »
Just some thoughts on steels and mill rollers-it looks like the BC and JSP use 1018 steel, which is a low carbon steel. That makes it great for machining, but not so great for wear. I believe I saw something about case hardening for the JSP, which is most likely a carburization process. This would make a huge difference in wear life. Looking around, monster mills use 1144 steel, which can be quite a bit harder. I haven't used it (Still using my sweet Corona mill), but if you're spending ~$200 on a mill, you might as well go with a higher grade steel roller.

Offline ynotbrusum

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2571
  • Da mihi sis cerevisiam.
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2017, 03:56:46 PM »
No O ring and my Jack Schmidling JSP is cranking along perfectly well after several years.  I have a low rpm high torque motor attached with a Buna Spider and it munches along without any problems.  My BC has been relegated to crushing my late addition dark malts, which it seems to handle with no problems, so I keep it in the brewhouse.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 18643
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: malt mill
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2017, 04:23:45 PM »
Just some thoughts on steels and mill rollers-it looks like the BC and JSP use 1018 steel, which is a low carbon steel. That makes it great for machining, but not so great for wear. I believe I saw something about case hardening for the JSP, which is most likely a carburization process. This would make a huge difference in wear life. Looking around, monster mills use 1144 steel, which can be quite a bit harder. I haven't used it (Still using my sweet Corona mill), but if you're spending ~$200 on a mill, you might as well go with a higher grade steel roller.

But what if it doesn't really matter? I've run thousands of lb. of malt through my JSP in the last 20 years and it still preforms like new.  Harder steel wouldn't make any difference if it's perfect as is, right?
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline BrewBama

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1011
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2017, 04:25:03 PM »
I think I removed the o-ring on my JSP long ago. Works great


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Huntsville AL

Offline Phil_M

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1502
  • Southern Maryland
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #28 on: November 16, 2017, 07:37:35 PM »
Just some thoughts on steels and mill rollers-it looks like the BC and JSP use 1018 steel, which is a low carbon steel. That makes it great for machining, but not so great for wear. I believe I saw something about case hardening for the JSP, which is most likely a carburization process. This would make a huge difference in wear life. Looking around, monster mills use 1144 steel, which can be quite a bit harder. I haven't used it (Still using my sweet Corona mill), but if you're spending ~$200 on a mill, you might as well go with a higher grade steel roller.

But what if it doesn't really matter? I've run thousands of lb. of malt through my JSP in the last 20 years and it still preforms like new.  Harder steel wouldn't make any difference if it's perfect as is, right?

If it's case hardened, and the depth of the hardening varies enough it could matter. If you wear through the hardening no amount of re-knurling will ever hold.
Don't buy stale beer.

Offline Wilbur

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 158
    • View Profile
Re: malt mill
« Reply #29 on: Today at 08:10:06 AM »
But what if it doesn't really matter? I've run thousands of lb. of malt through my JSP in the last 20 years and it still preforms like new.  Harder steel wouldn't make any difference if it's perfect as is, right?

To that point Denny, then why not save $130 and get a corona mill? Add some washers, or a 3D printed cover (Shameless brag) and you still have enough left over to buy some other equipment. If you feel it's perfect, and it probably is, don't listen to idiots (like me) on the internet!



If people feel like the knurling if wearing away on their rollers and affecting the performance, then they might want to look at option that mught prevent it. The 1144 rollers are probably through hardened. Case hardening could be a few millimeters deep, although it's probably less than that. Maybe a 0.5-1 mm? Hard to say without knowing more about the process.