Author Topic: Adding dextrose  (Read 1147 times)

Offline jc24

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 31
    • View Profile
Adding dextrose
« on: October 31, 2017, 06:03:06 AM »
Recently I have been adding dextrose to most of my brews in order to get the ABV measurements and FG where I want them. I'm wondering if there is any point in doing this? If I'm brewing an AIPA and want the beer to finish at around 1.012, will I get any flavour/body benefits from adding dextrose to boost the OG without making it finish too high? Would I be better off only using DME and therefore having a lower OG if I wanted the beer to finish at a low FG?

Offline Bob357

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 142
  • I can't hang with Denny. My day ends at 1.060.
    • View Profile
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2017, 08:20:49 AM »
Adding simple sugars to raise OG and dry out the finish a bit is common when brewing IPAs. Some people say up to 20% is OK, but I never go over 10%. In an AIPA most people want the hops in the front seat, so a less malty profile is just fine. I like to avoid crystal malts and go with Munich or Vienna for color some maltiness for balance if needed.

Also, I doubt that you'd ever notice any difference if you replaced the dextrose with table sugar. Put the extra buck or 2 into more hops for some extra kick.
Beer is my bucket list,

Bob357
Fallon, NV

Offline jc24

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 31
    • View Profile
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2017, 02:58:27 PM »
Thanks bob, but what’s to gain from adding dextrose? Is it purely to increase ABV? If no flavour benefit, why not just start with a lower OG?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8461
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2017, 06:27:59 AM »
The benefit is more alcohol, as dextrose is 100% fermentable. Makes a big IPA more drinkable with less malt flavor and body. Years ago I got the idea from the Pliny clone.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/russian-river-pliny-the-elder-clone/
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Online denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 18651
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2017, 08:53:44 AM »
The benefit is more alcohol, as dextrose is 100% fermentable. Makes a big IPA more drinkable with less malt flavor and body. Years ago I got the idea from the Pliny clone.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/russian-river-pliny-the-elder-clone/

An equal benefit is reducing the body of the beer.  I sometimes use sugar to do that while decreasing other ingredients so I don't get the ABV boost.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8461
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2017, 09:13:46 AM »
The benefit is more alcohol, as dextrose is 100% fermentable. Makes a big IPA more drinkable with less malt flavor and body. Years ago I got the idea from the Pliny clone.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/russian-river-pliny-the-elder-clone/

An equal benefit is reducing the body of the beer.  I sometimes use sugar to do that while decreasing other ingredients so I don't get the ABV boost.
I did say reduce the body.  :) I didn’t point point out your technique.

Hey, I use Tate and Lyles in my British Bitters to give it that little something. Making invert 2 is on my list of things to try.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Online denny

  • Administrator
  • Retired with too much time on my hands
  • *****
  • Posts: 18651
  • Noti OR [1991.4, 287.6deg] AR
    • View Profile
    • Dennybrew
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2017, 10:02:57 AM »
The benefit is more alcohol, as dextrose is 100% fermentable. Makes a big IPA more drinkable with less malt flavor and body. Years ago I got the idea from the Pliny clone.
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/homebrew-recipe/russian-river-pliny-the-elder-clone/

An equal benefit is reducing the body of the beer.  I sometimes use sugar to do that while decreasing other ingredients so I don't get the ABV boost.
I did say reduce the body.  :) I didn’t point point out your technique.

Hey, I use Tate and Lyles in my British Bitters to give it that little something. Making invert 2 is on my list of things to try.

Once again, I replied before the second cup of coffee!
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

www.dennybrew.com

The best, sharpest, funniest, weirdest and most knowledgable minds in home brewing contribute on the AHA forum. - Alewyfe

"The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." - Bertrand Russell

Offline ethinson

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 297
  • Why is the beer always gone?
    • View Profile
    • River Pirate Brewing Co.
Re: Adding dextrose
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2017, 01:16:21 PM »
Thanks bob, but what’s to gain from adding dextrose? Is it purely to increase ABV? If no flavour benefit, why not just start with a lower OG?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I started adding small amounts of dextrose to my beers to lower the FG.  In your example, you want to finish at 1.012, but you won't get there with 100% DME (at least not in my experience).  My beers were finishing around 1.020-1.024, which can lead to a lot of sweetness and oxidation flavors as the beer ages.  Lower FG will make a beer crisper (especially for hoppy beers like IPAs).  You can account for it by lowering your extract amount so your ABV doesn't change. 

Also: What Denny said.
SE Portland - AKA Beervana
Captain and Chief Deck Swabber - River Pirate Brewing Co.
Certified BJCP Beer Judge
2015 Oregon Brew Crew Member of the Year