Author Topic: When to add orange peel  (Read 1059 times)

Offline BrewBama

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1020
    • View Profile
When to add orange peel
« on: November 01, 2017, 04:07:34 PM »
I have a Holiday Beer recipe that states to add sweet orange peel at beginning of the boil.  I have always read to add orange peel near the end of boil or even in secondary.   Have you heard of this method and more importantly have you tried it?  If so, was the effect pleasant?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Huntsville AL

Offline factory

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 270
  • Virginia Beach, VA
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2017, 05:51:20 AM »
hmmm....  Like you, I have read/heard to add the orange peel in the last 5-10 minutes or so of the boil.  I've made a few Belgian wits this way and they turned out well with plenty of flavor.  I would think that the longer one leaves something like that in the boil, the more likely it would be to extract bitter elements from the peel, and the volatile oils would evaporate out.

I have never left anything like that in longer than a few minutes, so I can't really speak to that.

Offline TeeDubb

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 31
  • TeeDubb
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2017, 08:16:47 AM »
I brewed a Belgian Wit last year and added the peel only during the last 5 min of boil.  The 0.5oz added nice flavor and a touch of aroma.  I would not change anything if I brewed it again.

Offline Kutaka

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 99
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #3 on: November 06, 2017, 04:25:28 PM »
If you add it to the boil, do it in the last 5-10 minutes and only add the orange zest, not the white pith.  Alternatively, you can add the zest near the end of fermentation.  Never use the pith. 

A 60 minute orange peel boil is absurd.

Offline BrewBama

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1020
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #4 on: November 06, 2017, 05:14:41 PM »
I emailed the source of the recipe and received this reply:

“I don’t think the recipe you are reading is accurate.  I, too, have never heard of anyone adding orange peel at the start of the boil.  I think it was a typo.  I would recommend 10-15 minutes before knock out (end of boil).”


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Huntsville AL

Offline Kutaka

  • Cellarman
  • **
  • Posts: 99
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2017, 05:38:45 PM »
Ok that's good.  But what about the pith?  The pith of the citrus is the Devil.  Never use the pith!  Shave the orange colored zest off with a micro plane or something like it.  The pith produces unpleasant bitterness and the aroma of rotting garbage.  True story. 

Offline Richard

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2017, 02:04:42 PM »
I was just about to start a thread on orange peel.  I wasn't sure when to add, either.  This is great!  One question I'd like to add to the mix is: fresh or dried orange peels?  What if I go to the store and just buy some oranges and use those peels?  Would it be better to dry them out over a couple days?  Thanks!

Offline goschman

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3328
    • View Profile
Re: When to add orange peel
« Reply #7 on: November 09, 2017, 02:36:18 PM »
I was just about to start a thread on orange peel.  I wasn't sure when to add, either.  This is great!  One question I'd like to add to the mix is: fresh or dried orange peels?  What if I go to the store and just buy some oranges and use those peels?  Would it be better to dry them out over a couple days?  Thanks!

I personally prefer to use fresh orange zest whether it is going into the end of the boil or fermenter. Lately I have really be liking the character from adding it to the fermenter like a dry hop addition.
On Tap/Bottled: Hazy IPA, BraunBier, Berry Belgian Cider, Pilsner, Doppelbraun                

Fermenting:
Up Next: Red Rye Ale, Black Lager