Author Topic: Wyeast 3522 questions  (Read 3031 times)

Offline Kutaka

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Re: Wyeast 3522 questions
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2017, 12:33:17 AM »
Checked many years of notes on 3787. As I mentioned before, it produces a mild, pleasant spice note for me that isn't clove.  It also produces a mild plum ester when fermented at 68F and finished at 72F.  Colder fermentation produces less of both.  Hotter fermentation produces a bad banana vodka beer that I drain poured after a few months of waiting for it to smooth out. 

These observations are subject to variable pitch rates, nutrient supplements and O2 injections.  Your mileage may vary.  This statement is not a binding agreement in the state of California.  Kutaka is not responsible for crap beer made using this anecdote.           

Offline denny

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Re: Wyeast 3522 questions
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2017, 04:56:57 PM »
I rarely ferment it that cold.  I start it at 68 and finish at 72+.  This produces a Belgian (or British) yeasty aroma that isn't fruity or spicy.  It produces esters, but they are below what I can sense.   

If you like it, go for it.  I've found I prefer it lower.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline Kutaka

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Re: Wyeast 3522 questions
« Reply #17 on: November 08, 2017, 10:56:09 PM »

If you like it, go for it.  I've found I prefer it lower.

Digging further into my notes on 3787, it appears a very clean result IS possible with a big pitch and a stable low 60s fermentation.  Presumably that is what you do. 

Why bother using 3787 to make a Belgian beer if the result is no significant phenols or esters?  Every time I've drunk a Westmalle, clean yeast was not a descriptor that came to mind.