Author Topic: Vùng miền núi nên sử dụng gói cước FPT nào  (Read 889 times)

Offline snowfun87

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Vùng miền núi nên sử dụng gói cước FPT nào
« on: November 17, 2017, 03:39:30 PM »
Vùng miền núi nên sử dụng gói cước FPT nào

Trung du và miền núi Bắc Bộ có vị trí địa lý khá đặc biệt, lại có mạng lưới giao thông vận tải đang được đầu tư, nâng cấp, nên ngày càng thuận lợi cho việc giao lưu với các vùng khác trong nước và xây dựng nền kinh tế mở.

--->> Tìm hiểu về dịch vụ internet FPT: https://internetfpt.vn

Với nguồn tài nguyên thiên nhiên đa dạng, có khả năng đa dạng hóa cơ cấu kinh tế, với thế mạnh về công nghiệp khai thác và chế biến khoáng sản, thủy điện, nền nông nghiệp nhiệt đới có cả những sản phẩm cận nhiệt và ôn đới, nên rất thuận lợi phát triển du lịch. Nắm bắt được điều này tập đoàn FPT đã có nhiều chương trình khuyến mãi hấp dẫn, fpt mạng internet  với nhiều gói cước phù hợp để đáp ứng nhu cầu của người dân tại khu vực miền núi. Bạn đọc có thể tham khảo bài viết dưới đây:


Internet vùng nông thôn

--->>> Xem thêm khuyến mãi lắp mạng cáp quang fpt

1 số gói Wifi của FPT dành cho nhóm khách hàng công ty, doanh nghiệp, quán game

Với nhóm khách hàng là Công ty, hộ kinh doanh, doanh nghiệp, tổ chức nhà nước, quán game,… yêu cầu lắp đặt mạng không dây Wifi phải đáp ứng được tốc độ truy cập mạng càng nhanh càng tốt, khả năng chịu tải tốt vì có rất nhiều thiết bị công nghệ truy cập mạng cùng lúc. Do đó, các gói Wifi FPT mà FPT Telecom triển khai cung cấp dành cho nhóm khách hàng này có tốc độ truy cập mạng từ 45Mbps đến 80Mbps, tốc độ cam kết quốc tế từ 1,1Mbps đến 3Mbps và sử dụng đường truyền 100% cáp quang siêu ổn định. Giá Wifi FPT các gói cước này dao động từ 800.000 đồng đến 8.000.000 đồng tùy theo từng gói cước.



*Hình thức thanh toán cáp quang FPT doanh nghiệp:

Trả sau từng tháng: Phí vật tư 1.000.000 đồng.

Trả trước 6 tháng: Miễn phí vật tư + Giảm 50% tháng cước thứ 7

Trả trước 1 năm: Miễn phí vật tư + Miễn phí tháng cước thứ 13, 14

Các gói cước Wifi FPT dành cho nhóm khách hàng cá nhân, hộ gia đình

Với nhóm khách hàng là cá nhân, hộ gia đình có nhu cầu sử dụng mạng Wifi có tốc độ truy cập mạng vừa phải, cước phí trọn gói cước internet fpt hàng tháng rẻ, FPT Telecom đã triển khai cung cấp 4 gói cước Wifi FPT là gói F5, gói F4, gói F3 và gói F2.

Các gói cước Wifi của FPT này có tốc độ truy cập mạng từ 16Mbps đến 45Mbps. Bảng giá cước Wifi FPT trọn gói theo tháng dành cho nhóm khách hàng cá nhân, gia đình chỉ từ 220.000đ/tháng rất phù hợp với nhu cầu sử dụng và khả năng chi trả của nhóm khách hàng này.


1 số gói cước cho hộ gia đình

--->> Xem chi tiết Bảng giá các gói cước Internet của FPT 2018

Hi vọng qua bài viết này các bạn  có thể lựa chọn được gói cước phù hợp với nhu cầu sử dụng cho mình.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2018, 08:31:34 AM by snowfun87 »

Offline denny

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2017, 04:40:01 PM »
Don't base your water on a city profile.  Almost any brewery will adjust the water so basing it on a city profile doesn't get you what you think it does.  Go for a color/flavor profile.
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Offline BrewBama

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How's this water for a porter
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2017, 10:56:27 PM »
This is something I saved from another site. Take it or leave it. Your choice.

By AJ deLange

One of the first things a beginning brewer is told is that beer is typically 95% water and that, as a consequence of this, getting the water one brews with “correct” for the style is very important. He is also told that most beer styles evolved the way they did because of the nature of the water with which they were originally brewed. Those statements are true enough but the process of understanding what is “correct” and the process of going between the water one has and the “correct” water is, to many, one of the most daunting aspects of brewing.

Many beginning and advanced brewers assume that it is necessary when brewing, for example, a Munich Helles, to duplicate Munich water and there are many places where one can find ion profiles for Munich water and spreadsheets into which one can insert those profiles and details of one’s own water and be given advice on what minerals to add to duplicate Munich. There are multiple potential problems with this approach. First, published water reports are very often wrong. Second, it is not enough to know what Munich water is like, You must also know what the brewer did to make the beer with the existing water. In the case of Helles, for example, the water needs to be softened. Finally, the spreadsheets often calculate salt additions based on simplifications of the chemistry involved, consideration of things that are essentially irrelevant (beer color, chloride to sulfate ration) and reliance on models of things (e.g. effects of dark malt on mash pH) that really can’t be modeled very well. When all the approximations are good the result can be fine but when they aren’t the result can be salt addition recommendations that can have a detrimental effect on the beer,

In this note we are going to take a very simple approach to brewing water preparation. In tailoring water we seek 2 goals. The first, arguably more important than the second, is to be sure that the water properties are consistent with mash pH in a suitable range (5.1 – 5.5). The second is that, on the one hand, the mineral content not add or cause flavors which the drinker may not like and on the other that minerals which have a positive effect on the beer, be available in adequate quantity, The first goal cannot be achieved by the use of water treatment alone. Acid is usually required. This is traditionally supplied in German brewing by the use of lactic acid in the form of sauermalz (acidulated malt) or sauergut (wort fermented by lactic bacteria) while in British practice a blend of mineral acids is usually empoyed. Thus the recommendations that follow also specify acid additions.

The following recommendations apply to “soft” water. Here we will define soft as meaning RO or distilled water or any water whose lab report indicates alkalinity less than 35 (ppm as CaCO3 – all other numbers to follow mg/L), sulfate less than 20 (as sulfate – Ward Labs reports as sulfur so multiply the SO4-S number by 3 to get as sulfate), chloride less than 20, sodium less than 20, calcium less than 20 and magnesium less than 20. If your water has numbers higher than these, dilute it with RO or DI water. A 1:1 dilution reduces each ion concentration to 1/2, a 2:1 dilution to 1/3 and so on. If your water contains chloramines add 1 campden tablet per 20 gallons (before any dilution)

Baseline: Add 1 tsp of calcium chloride dihydrate (what your LHBS sells) to each 5 gallons of water treated. Add 2% sauermalz to the grist.

Deviate from the baseline as follows:

For soft water beers (i.e Pils, Helles). Use half the baseline amount of calcium chloride and increase the sauermalz to 3%

For beers that use roast malt (Stout, porter): Skip the sauermalz.

For British beers: Add 1 tsp gypsum as well as 1 tsp calcium chloride

For very minerally beers (Export, Burton ale): Double the calcium chloride and the gypsum.

These recommendations should get you a good beer if not the best beer. To get the best you should vary the amounts of the added salts noting carefully whether a change benefits or detriments your enjoyment of the beer. Additional sulfate will sharpen the perceived hops bitterness. Additional chloride will round, smooth and sweeten the beer. Add or decrease these in small amounts.

Those serious about getting the best possible results should buy a pH meter and check mash pH increasing or decreasing the amount of sauermalz to get pH around 5.3. Unfortunately the strips don’t seem to work very well.


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« Last Edit: November 17, 2017, 10:58:37 PM by BrewBama »
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #3 on: November 18, 2017, 03:14:27 AM »
This is something I saved from another site. Take it or leave it. Your choice.


Careful in using those recommendations as they are simplistic, incomplete, and superseded. You would have to read through several hundred posts to figure out all the revisions to that initial post.
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Offline braufessor

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2017, 03:38:16 AM »
I use a blend of my high bicarbonate tap water and RO in my porter to end up at the following.... it turns out really well.  I brew it on a regular basis. (I use B'run Water)

40% RO
60% Tap Water

Projected pH 5.6
Ca = 52
Mg = 10
Na =26
Sulfate = 52
Chloride = 66
Bicarbonate = 180


Offline BrewBama

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #5 on: November 18, 2017, 04:05:50 PM »
This is something I saved from another site. Take it or leave it. Your choice.


Careful in using those recommendations as they are simplistic, incomplete, and superseded. You would have to read through several hundred posts to figure out all the revisions to that initial post.

Understood. I realize some folks want to deep dive into each element of brewing. That approach is not for everyone e.g. for me close enough is good enough.

For example, I’ve had more than one local pro tell me they don’t add any salts at all. One says they simply filter the water and that’s it. Another says they simply adjust for pH with acid and that’s it. Several awards have been won by both and I personally have sampled most, if not all, of their brews. They are delicious.

So... my takeaway is the whole stress over water seems somewhat over rated and the simple approach above seems within reason. YMMV


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Offline denny

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2017, 04:43:53 PM »
This is something I saved from another site. Take it or leave it. Your choice.


Careful in using those recommendations as they are simplistic, incomplete, and superseded. You would have to read through several hundred posts to figure out all the revisions to that initial post.

Understood. I realize some folks want to deep dive into each element of brewing. That approach is not for everyone e.g. for me close enough is good enough.

For example, I’ve had more than one local pro tell me they don’t add any salts at all. One says they simply filter the water and that’s it. Another says they simply adjust for pH with acid and that’s it. Several awards have been won by both and I personally have sampled most, if not all, of their brews. They are delicious.

So... my takeaway is the whole stress over water seems somewhat over rated and the simple approach above seems within reason. YMMV


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If you brew the same limited range of light lagers that AJ does, that could work.  But most people brew a wider variety of beers and need different water profiles than that.
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Offline BrewBama

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How's this water for a porter
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2017, 08:13:24 PM »
The pros I am referencing brew a very wide range of beers simply by filtering and/or adjusting pH with acid. No salts at all. Today’s taplist includes a Stout, a Saison, a Blonde Ale, a Hefe, a Scottish Ale, and an IPA among others from one brewer. Quite a range outside light lager.

I can’t speak for AJ — he can address this range of brewing.  But by reading his message above he seems to address a bit wider range than simply light lagers as well for example those that use roasted malts (Stouts and Porters), British beers, and Burton-ized.  ...but he can speak to that.

I think it was Gordon Strong in an AHA convention presentation that said some folks were turning in Alka-Selzer like beers for competition because some piece of software told them to add salts to make water like (fill in the blank). Yuck.

I think it goes back to ‘know why you’re doing what you’re doing’. .2 g of X and .5 g of Y is probably not worth it in a 5 gal batch for me. To each his own. YMMV.

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« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 08:58:20 PM by BrewBama »
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2017, 09:44:55 PM »
Brewbama. There is no requirement that brewers add minerals to their tap water. But the recommendations presented from AJ are based on starting with RO or distilled water. That is a recipe for some pretty bland beer. Add minerals ONLY as needed to IMPROVE flavor, not because a questionable source pointed to that solution. I hope anyone considering brewing water adjustment, considers the source and makes their own assessment of that source.

The most important thing you point out is that that brewery is adjusting pH to fit the style. That is certainly an important first step to making better beer.  It's good to hear.

AJ's recommendations for stout/porter brewing in that post is entirely insufficient for most of those styles. Most stout/porter brewing will require the addition of a base to the mashing water to help keep the mash and wort pH from dropping too low, which can result in harsh and acrid roast character.

Gordon Strong's observations are certainly true. I've experienced that too. Brewers that add a tsp of this and a tsp of that without regard for the style and their starting point, can end up with alka-seltzer minerality in their beer. Again, research your sources and don't over-mineralize your water. In that respect, AJ's recommendations above are very light additions that avoid alka-seltzer when starting with RO and distilled water.  That's a good thing for anyone.
« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 09:47:17 PM by mabrungard »
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Offline Stevie

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #9 on: November 20, 2017, 11:24:16 PM »
I wish I could brew with filtered tap water. Would eliminate an errand and minor expense.

Offline BrewBama

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How's this water for a porter
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2017, 11:31:51 PM »
I don’t doubt you’re right Martin.

Coincidentally, I was hangin out at a brewery today while the gang was mashing a triple for a Christmas party on their pilot system. I took the opportunity to ask all kinds of questions about water to the other home brewers and the pro. The pro brewer said, “We test our water regularly and have decided filtering is all we need to do.”  He also said he doesn’t think any of the local pro brewers add salts except one.  I had a tasty Stout, a friend had an IPA, and another had a Blonde so they do have a wide range on tap.

I found it particularly interesting that all three local pros I’ve spoken to simply filter the local municipal tap water.

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« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 11:46:30 PM by BrewBama »
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Offline curtdogg

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Re: How's this water for a porter
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2017, 05:16:16 PM »
If I start with:

Ca = 86
Mg = 14
Na = 18
SO4 = 8
Cl = 22
HCO3 = 140

and add minerals to get to:

Ca = 116.6
Mg = 24.4
Na = 36
SO4 = 49.2
Cl = 22
HCO3 = 314

I changed my mind and I'm shooting for Dublin-like water.
Was your question answered?  Seems the post got de railed a bit.
 If you use bru n water choose one of the pre-set water profiles like "black full".
I would adjust my profile as close to the pre-set as possible. For a porter or stout I like to keep my mash pH between 5.5-5.6

Hope this helps.
Cheers.

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