Author Topic: Puzzle  (Read 566 times)

Offline klickitat jim

  • I must live here
  • **********
  • Posts: 8589
    • View Profile
Puzzle
« on: November 29, 2017, 01:58:04 PM »
I like some English beers. London Pride is probably my favorite. I got it at something or other Station in Portland, Oregon a couple years ago.

I'm drinking one of my APAs right now. Simple grain bill, moderate bittering, gob of Vic Secret and Cascade in whirlpool, 1056... I brewed it in February. The keg has been in at 35f ever since. I just noticed, it's developing an "English" character,  just like the London Pride I got in Portland.

What do you think is causing that?

Makes me think I should bottle a few and enter it as an ESB. Instant 45 point winner lol.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 02:03:13 PM by klickitat jim »

Offline homoeccentricus

  • Brewmaster General
  • *******
  • Posts: 2008
  • A twerp from Antwerp
    • View Profile
Re: Puzzle
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2017, 03:00:36 PM »
Oxidation.
Frank P.

Staggering on the shoulders of giant dwarfs.

Offline erockrph

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 6228
  • Chepachet, RI
    • View Profile
    • The Hop WHisperer
Re: Puzzle
« Reply #2 on: November 29, 2017, 07:37:23 PM »
Oxidation.
I hate to say it, but that's probably it. Fullers ESB is one of my favorite English beers, but the flavor is night and day when you compare a fresh sample versus one with some age on it.

That said, I don't mind older samples. They start to lose their fresh hop flavor, but they start to pick notes of honey/caramel/fig. For whatever reason, English styles seem less adversely affected by oxidation compared to something like a pale lager or an IPA.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline dmtaylor

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3390
  • Two Rivers, WI
    • View Profile
    • Manty Malters - Meet the Malters! - Dave Taylor
Re: Puzzle
« Reply #3 on: November 29, 2017, 08:09:29 PM »
Oxidation.

This.

I actually don't mind a bit of oxidation in my beer.  In competition, it's usually a fault.  But in non-comp situations, it's okay with me.
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8959
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: Puzzle
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2017, 12:37:27 AM »
Oxidation.

This.

I actually don't mind a bit of oxidation in my beer.  In competition, it's usually a fault.  But in non-comp situations, it's okay with me.

Unless the competition judges only have Fullers or other British beers from bottles as a point of reference. Then they want that sweet oxidized character. Having had it fresh at the brewery, and in bottles here, I no longer drink the bottles here.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline snowtiger87

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 443
    • View Profile
Re: Puzzle
« Reply #5 on: December 01, 2017, 08:42:40 PM »
Yeah, if I want an English Bitter, I make my own  ;)
Brewing since 1989 - BJCP National Rank
Member of KROC and Foam on the Range

Fermenting: Double IPA
Conditioning: Saison du Potiron
On tap: Cider, Cream Ale, Bock, Rye Dunkel Doppelbock, Celebration Clone, Imperial Stout