Author Topic: Bier de Garde  (Read 1001 times)

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Bier de Garde
« Reply #15 on: December 08, 2017, 10:55:41 PM »
Majorvices,

Please let us Francophiles know how these beers turn out. Thanks.

I will!

Yeah, definitely curious what you will think of those strains in this style...

I too have typically used WY 1007 for my amber/brown BDG's with fairly good success. I have yet to try a lager strain and probably will the next time I brew one. Maybe ferment the lager strain around 55-60F (probably towards the lower end) to keep the profile clean.

I may be wrong, but I think that if you use an ale yeast, you should do so at lower than usual ale temps. If you are using lager yeast, ferment at higher than usual lager temps. I think I got this from Markowski's Farmhouse Ales.
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'

Offline denny

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Re: Bier de Garde
« Reply #16 on: December 08, 2017, 11:19:10 PM »
Majorvices,

Please let us Francophiles know how these beers turn out. Thanks.

I will!

Yeah, definitely curious what you will think of those strains in this style...

I too have typically used WY 1007 for my amber/brown BDG's with fairly good success. I have yet to try a lager strain and probably will the next time I brew one. Maybe ferment the lager strain around 55-60F (probably towards the lower end) to keep the profile clean.

I may be wrong, but I think that if you use an ale yeast, you should do so at lower than usual ale temps. If you are using lager yeast, ferment at higher than usual lager temps. I think I got this from Markowski's Farmhouse Ales.

I occasionally use lager yeast, but my go to is WY1007 at 55F.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline brewinhard

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Re: Bier de Garde
« Reply #17 on: December 09, 2017, 12:48:25 AM »
Majorvices,

Please let us Francophiles know how these beers turn out. Thanks.

I will!

Yeah, definitely curious what you will think of those strains in this style...

I too have typically used WY 1007 for my amber/brown BDG's with fairly good success. I have yet to try a lager strain and probably will the next time I brew one. Maybe ferment the lager strain around 55-60F (probably towards the lower end) to keep the profile clean.

I may be wrong, but I think that if you use an ale yeast, you should do so at lower than usual ale temps. If you are using lager yeast, ferment at higher than usual lager temps. I think I got this from Markowski's Farmhouse Ales.

Yup. Agreed. That is why I stated 55-60 for a lager. I usually run my lager ferments around 46-48F depending on the strain. I would probably not take any lager strain higher than 60F though. I feel that they can throw off some weird aromas around there.

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: Bier de Garde
« Reply #18 on: December 09, 2017, 12:28:20 PM »
Majorvices,

Please let us Francophiles know how these beers turn out. Thanks.

I will!

Yeah, definitely curious what you will think of those strains in this style...

I too have typically used WY 1007 for my amber/brown BDG's with fairly good success. I have yet to try a lager strain and probably will the next time I brew one. Maybe ferment the lager strain around 55-60F (probably towards the lower end) to keep the profile clean.

I may be wrong, but I think that if you use an ale yeast, you should do so at lower than usual ale temps. If you are using lager yeast, ferment at higher than usual lager temps. I think I got this from Markowski's Farmhouse Ales.

Yup. Agreed. That is why I stated 55-60 for a lager. I usually run my lager ferments around 46-48F depending on the strain. I would probably not take any lager strain higher than 60F though. I feel that they can throw off some weird aromas around there.

Gotcha!
Frank C.

And thereof comes the proverb: 'Blessing of your
heart, you brew good ale.'