Author Topic: black and tan question  (Read 1493 times)

Offline Steve Ruch

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black and tan question
« on: December 17, 2017, 06:46:18 PM »
I've seen black and tans pictured with a clear divide half way up the glass having the upper part black and the lower part tan. How is this done?
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Offline goschman

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2017, 07:08:06 PM »
I've seen black and tans pictured with a clear divide half way up the glass having the upper part black and the lower part tan. How is this done?

Well the classic is Guinness and bass right? The Guinness is on nitro so I assume it has something to do with that.
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Offline Stevie

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2017, 07:44:32 PM »
Guinness is less dense and poured to prevent mixing.

Offline erockrph

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2017, 07:45:51 PM »
It has to do with density. Guinness is a lower gravity than Bass and will float on top. The clear divide is the tough part, but that's why you usually see it poured over the back of a spoon (or something similar). If you pour too hard, then the Guinness will start to mix with the Bass, and you see less of a sharp split between the two.

This is the same way that layered shots work, by the way.
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Offline Robert

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2017, 05:40:54 AM »
The clear divide is the tough part, but that's why you usually see it poured over the back of a spoon (or something similar).
Tough part indeed.  Took a lot of practice and I never quite managed it.  But it was trending at the same time as stuffing a lime in a skunky Mexican beer was, so you have to question the whole idea.  A black and tan, like any beer cocktail, can be a great drink.  But if the two parts aren't actually  blended, what's the point?
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2017, 11:52:25 AM »
The clear divide is the tough part, but that's why you usually see it poured over the back of a spoon (or something similar).
Tough part indeed.  Took a lot of practice and I never quite managed it.  But it was trending at the same time as stuffing a lime in a skunky Mexican beer was, so you have to question the whole idea.  A black and tan, like any beer cocktail, can be a great drink.  But if the two parts aren't actually  blended, what's the point?

Usually it tends to blend itself as you sip. Once you've had the first sip or two you can usually tip the glass enough that you sip from the border between the two. Personally, I do prefer this to mixed, each sip is different and you can still enjoy the two beers separately to an extent.
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Offline Robert

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2017, 01:05:55 PM »
Seen those layered latte pics online? Now something like that would offer both visual appeal AND a blend of the two  flavors.  Like a black and tan this has something to do with sorting by density.
Rob
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #7 on: December 18, 2017, 05:02:50 PM »
Guinness definitely has convinced people the only true black and tan is Guinness and Bass although you can do it with any dark and light beer. My personal preference for widely available beer is Left Hand Milk Stout and Deschutes Mirror Pond.

Guinness (or somebody else) sells a special spoon to help create that division. It looks like a soup spoon but it has a notch on the handle so it will fit on a shaker pint without moving. It helps slow and spread the pour so the Guinness will sit on top and not mix. While it looks great it interferes with mixing flavor which is a lot more important than the appearance IMO.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #8 on: December 18, 2017, 05:11:48 PM »
If the idea is to have a blended beer, then I would simply blend them; if not, separate glasses work much better!
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Offline Robert

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #9 on: December 18, 2017, 06:10:27 PM »
Guinness definitely has convinced people the only true black and tan is Guinness and Bass although you can do it with any dark and light beer. My personal preference for widely available beer is Left Hand Milk Stout and Deschutes Mirror Pond.
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Rob
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #10 on: December 18, 2017, 06:37:12 PM »
So, the beer with the lower final gravity should be poured second?
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Offline Robert

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2017, 06:45:01 PM »
So, the beer with the lower final gravity should be poured second?
Well, with classic Guinness version it's the nitro that makes it less dense, not necessarily gravity.  So, hmm...
Rob
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #12 on: December 18, 2017, 07:03:02 PM »
I thought it was gravity? Guinness is very dry, lower FG than many beers. I've done other "off-brand" black and tans and the stout sank right through the lager.

And why are we even using the term "Guinness" and "Black and Tan" in the same sentence?
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Offline Robert

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #13 on: December 18, 2017, 07:05:44 PM »
I thought it was gravity? Guinness is very dry, lower FG than many beers. I've done other "off-brand" black and tans and the stout sank right through the lager.

And why are we even using the term "Guinness" and "Black and Tan" in the same sentence?
I'll  defer to you. You at least have "experimental data! "
Rob
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: black and tan question
« Reply #14 on: December 18, 2017, 10:58:30 PM »
So, the beer with the lower final gravity should be poured second?
Well, with classic Guinness version it's the nitro that makes it less dense, not necessarily gravity.  So, hmm...

Less dense, lower gravity. Pretty much the same result.
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