Author Topic: Help with keezer design  (Read 826 times)

Offline weazletoe

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Help with keezer design
« on: December 22, 2017, 01:34:23 PM »
 I'm going to start to work on my keezer build this weekend. I'm having a bit of difficulty deciding if I want to put a 2x8 frame and run the taps out the front or build a tower. Aesthetically, I really like the looks of the tower. But for practicality, or to be pragmatic a Denny would say, coming out the front is the best option. I really hate to have to pull my freezer out every time I want to get in the top. Can I get some comments on advantages and disadvantages both ways? Thanks.
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Offline Andy Farke

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Re: Help with keezer design
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2017, 06:19:09 PM »
I built a wood collar and put the taps on the side (rather than the front; it was better for the room that the keezer is in). I used this setup, rather than a tower, for a few reasons. Firstly, I have read that towers can be a little harder to keep chilled on the last stretch of beer line (which can be fixed with a well-placed fan, but not to the extent of a collar setup). This isn't as major of an issue with collars (esp. if you have a little fan in place). Secondly, and most important for my needs, I wanted the freezer top to be free for storage, etc. I can put glassware on top during a party, or snacks, or whatever. You can also open up the top to change kegs more easily with a collar; as you note, you may have to move the whole keezer out from the wall (depending on placement) with a tower.

Disadvantages of a collar is that you definitely have to do a bit of monkeying with lid removal and placement, etc., and it can be harder to deal with drip trays (but quite workable -- I glued mine on the side). The other disadvantage is that you have stuff projecting out the side, which can be a hazard if you have lots of traffic near the keezer (e.g., small kids).

If I were to do it again, I would still go with a collar/taps out the side. For my situation, it has been pretty good.
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Offline Robert

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Re: Help with keezer design
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2017, 07:09:38 PM »
Other advantages of a collar:  Extra height inside means you can set a gas bottle with regulator on the "shelf" over the compressor leaving floor space for kegs. Temperature probe or gas lines can be brought through the collar.  Manifold can be mounted inside.  Lid removal and replacement is not very difficult.  You probably want to insulate the interior wall of the collar and seal everything up with tape, weatherstripping, etc. but that's not too hard.  If I built another keezer, I might do a few things differently, but I'd definitely go with a collar again.
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Help with keezer design
« Reply #3 on: December 23, 2017, 11:06:19 PM »
Thanks guys. After thinking about  it, I decided to go with the collar. It will be behind the bar, out of traffic. I will still have to pull it out to work inside, as it sits under my backbar. But, after thinking about it, seems like it will be the way for me.  I got the 2x6 today. My temp controller was delivered this morning, and my regulator should be here tomorrow.  I'm very excited!
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Offline tbutler2017

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Re: Help with keezer design
« Reply #4 on: December 24, 2017, 03:43:19 PM »
There was mention above about what to do for a drip tray.  When I built my kreezer I used one of these:

https://www.kegoutlet.com/drip-tray-for-3-draft-beer-faucets-with-drain.html

They are a little expensive but good quality.   They carry trays for 2 taps up to 6.


Todd B.

Offline Andy Farke

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Re: Help with keezer design
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2017, 04:14:43 PM »
Thanks guys. After thinking about  it, I decided to go with the collar. It will be behind the bar, out of traffic. I will still have to pull it out to work inside, as it sits under my backbar. But, after thinking about it, seems like it will be the way for me.  I got the 2x6 today. My temp controller was delivered this morning, and my regulator should be here tomorrow.  I'm very excited!

Good luck, and enjoy! Adding a keezer to my setup quite literally changed the way I brewed...no more bottling, and 3 beers on tap at any time, so it is now way easier to brew more frequently. And if I have a bunch of guests over, no sea of bottles on the kitchen counter afterwards! I hope you'll have a similarly awesome experience. :-)
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Help with keezer design
« Reply #6 on: December 24, 2017, 05:55:35 PM »
Thanks,  Andy. I used to have a tap system. (insert divorce story here) I'm now starting from the ground up. Nothing like your buddies staring in amazement at you when you pull a pint of your own beer from your own tap.
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