Author Topic: Propagate yeast.  (Read 981 times)

Offline curtdogg

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Propagate yeast.
« on: December 25, 2017, 09:59:39 PM »
I have two good Belgian beers I'm going to drink today. Westmalle triple and straffe hendrik quad. What is the easiest way to propagate the yeast at the bottom?
I do not have DME. I do have corn sugar wich I can use to make a "starter".
Any advise is greatly appreciated.


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Offline mabrungard

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #1 on: December 25, 2017, 11:13:40 PM »
If using corn sugar, yeast nutrient is highly recommended. But, using a wort product instead of corn sugar is always preferred.
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Offline curtdogg

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #2 on: December 25, 2017, 11:17:24 PM »
If using corn sugar, yeast nutrient is highly recommended. But, using a wort product instead of corn sugar is always preferred.
Thanks Martin. Happy Holidays.
How can I hang on to the dregs until I get DME?

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #3 on: December 26, 2017, 12:08:10 AM »
You can make your own starter by mashing a small amount of malt, running off the wort, then boil as usual.
Jeff Rankert
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Offline curtdogg

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #4 on: December 26, 2017, 12:15:24 AM »
You can make your own starter by mashing a small amount of malt, running off the wort, then boil as usual.
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

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Offline BitterItDown

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #5 on: December 26, 2017, 01:25:19 AM »
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

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When properly fermented beer in a keg has little to no residual sugar for normal beer yeast to feed off of and grow.  So, no you won't be able to use beer.

But you may be interested in this:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/06/05/real-wort-vs-dextrose-yeast-starter-exbeeriment-results/
« Last Edit: December 26, 2017, 01:28:13 AM by BitterItDown »

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #6 on: December 26, 2017, 01:41:21 AM »
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

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When properly fermented beer in a keg has little to no residual sugar for normal beer yeast to feed off of and grow.  So, no you won't be able to use beer.

But you may be interested in this:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/06/05/real-wort-vs-dextrose-yeast-starter-exbeeriment-results/

The dry yeast manufacturers use raw sugar (or is it molasses?) and yeast nutrients to grow their yeast. Some advertise that the yeast is gluten free, and that means they don’t use barley extract in the process.

What sugar form and how much nutrient in what form?
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Robert

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #7 on: December 26, 2017, 01:53:57 AM »
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

When properly fermented beer in a keg has little to no residual sugar for normal beer yeast to feed off of and grow.  So, no you won't be able to use beer.

But you may be interested in this:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/06/05/real-wort-vs-dextrose-yeast-starter-exbeeriment-results/

The dry yeast manufacturers use raw sugar (or is it molasses?) and yeast nutrients to grow their yeast. Some advertise that the yeast is gluten free, and that means they don’t use barley extract in the process.

What sugar form and how much nutrient in what form?
I believe the dry yeast manufacturers you refer to using molasses are primarily making baker's yeast.  Same species,  but the requirements for life cycle and performance of the yeast are very different.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline BitterItDown

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #8 on: December 26, 2017, 02:23:46 AM »

Offline curtdogg

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #9 on: December 26, 2017, 02:30:25 AM »
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

When properly fermented beer in a keg has little to no residual sugar for normal beer yeast to feed off of and grow.  So, no you won't be able to use beer.

But you may be interested in this:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/06/05/real-wort-vs-dextrose-yeast-starter-exbeeriment-results/
Duh, not.sure why I didn't think of that.
I need short chain maltose for those little bastards to be happy.
We'll I guess I'll sanitize a small jar Chuck in the dregs an wait till I brew again. Which will be Thursday .

Thanks for the advise Gents.
I'll read MF link in the mean time.

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #10 on: December 26, 2017, 05:10:39 AM »
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

When properly fermented beer in a keg has little to no residual sugar for normal beer yeast to feed off of and grow.  So, no you won't be able to use beer.

But you may be interested in this:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/06/05/real-wort-vs-dextrose-yeast-starter-exbeeriment-results/

The dry yeast manufacturers use raw sugar (or is it molasses?) and yeast nutrients to grow their yeast. Some advertise that the yeast is gluten free, and that means they don’t use barley extract in the process.

What sugar form and how much nutrient in what form?
I believe the dry yeast manufacturers you refer to using molasses are primarily making baker's yeast.  Same species,  but the requirements for life cycle and performance of the yeast are very different.
A local yeast expert that was around here before you said they use molasses. Mark is no longer active here.

How do they make gluten free yeast?
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Aksarben

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #11 on: December 27, 2017, 06:41:25 AM »
Just get some of the yeast at the bottom of your fermentor, put it in a pint jar and add some clean water.... full if  you want, and put it in the refrigerator.  After about 5-7 days, take out the jar, and open the lid, pour out the water and replace with more clean water, and replace lid and put back in fridge.  Will keep for a long time in a dormant state.
Vernon

Associate Winemaker, Fenn Valley Vineyards
Fennville, MI

I was born with nothing, and have managed to keep most of it.

Offline curtdogg

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #12 on: December 27, 2017, 06:44:23 AM »
Just get some of the yeast at the bottom of your fermentor, put it in a pint jar and add some clean water.... full if  you want, and put it in the refrigerator.  After about 5-7 days, take out the jar, and open the lid, pour out the water and replace with more clean water, and replace lid and put back in fridge.  Will keep for a long time in a dormant state.
Trying to propagate from a bottle conditioned beer.

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Offline Aksarben

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2017, 06:58:20 AM »
Gotcha!!  You can propagate it with simple sugars, but do NOT add yeast nutrient to the batch.  Yeast are sensitive to excessive amounts of yeast nutrient.  Go-Ferm yeast hydration is ok, just not nutrients.  However, if you want, I would merely add cold distilled water to the bottle and re-cap it and put it in the fridge until you do get a chance to get some DME and work at getting the yeast re-populated.  Won't take much, trust me.  I work for a winery that we have had filtered wine that did not have K-Sorbate added to it, take off again in a few weeks because of either just a few viable yeasts in the tank or air got to the main wine.  Gives you a chance to get the right ingredients when you get a chance.  It will keep.
Vernon

Associate Winemaker, Fenn Valley Vineyards
Fennville, MI

I was born with nothing, and have managed to keep most of it.

Offline Robert

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Re: Propagate yeast.
« Reply #14 on: December 27, 2017, 06:01:31 PM »
No malt either.
I have beer in the keg that's getting old.
Can I boil off the alcohol and use that?

Sent from my SM-G930P using Tapatalk

When properly fermented beer in a keg has little to no residual sugar for normal beer yeast to feed off of and grow.  So, no you won't be able to use beer.

But you may be interested in this:

http://brulosophy.com/2015/06/05/real-wort-vs-dextrose-yeast-starter-exbeeriment-results/

The dry yeast manufacturers use raw sugar (or is it molasses?) and yeast nutrients to grow their yeast. Some advertise that the yeast is gluten free, and that means they don’t use barley extract in the process.

What sugar form and how much nutrient in what form?
I believe the dry yeast manufacturers you refer to using molasses are primarily making baker's yeast.  Same species,  but the requirements for life cycle and performance of the yeast are very different.
A local yeast expert that was around here before you said they use molasses. Mark is no longer active here.

How do they make gluten free yeast?
You might have better info than I. I just know that baker's yeast is grown on media like you describe and in that case growth is ALL they care about, really.  If beer yeast is really grown that way it could contribute to the adaptation problem. I use the Weihenstephan lager strain and it generally takes about six generations to come into its own  under actual brewing conditions. But for just that reason, I wouldn't make my initial starter, when I buy a new culture, with a non-malt medium.  Might as well start getting it used to malt right there.  FWIW I generally start from liquid but have tried the dry version.  Only difference I can recall was that it was even slower in the starter and first generation, so I took the opportunity to get a fresh liquid culture at that time.
As to gluten free yeast, well, if it's going into a gluten free wort, it might have an advantage in being pre-adapted!
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.