Author Topic: Supplimental nutrient addition for big gravity beer  (Read 893 times)

Offline 1vertical

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Supplimental nutrient addition for big gravity beer
« on: August 05, 2010, 06:51:30 AM »
I was reading in the past postings and wanted to discuss this issue a little more.
I found this post http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?action=post;topic=343.0;num_replies=11
and got the over 120 day notice so hence the new topic.

If you decide to try to add more  nutrients to the fermentation as the activity of the yeast appears to decline,

How much additional nutrient should you add? (5 gallon Batch)

How should you add it?  Gently stir it in?
Will you see large outgassing? What is the oxygenation risk?

Will it contribute any weird flavors?

I have done this with a Mead and got really fantastic results (thanks Hightest)
I recall that you take a gravity reading and find a half way point...then you make a supplimental nutrient addition.

I have a big Saison at 1.078 and using WY 3711 it seems to be fermenting nicely. Today makes one week since pitching.
It is declining in activity however it still is bubbling forcefully.  I would like to help this yeast finish the job and get a good dry
Saison.  I am using Wyeast yeast nutrients.

Input from someone's experiences greatly appreciated.
« Last Edit: August 05, 2010, 06:54:49 AM by 1vertical »
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Offline bonjour

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Re: Supplimental nutrient addition for big gravity beer
« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2010, 07:00:56 AM »
1.078 is not a big beer,  some may even call it a session beer ;)
the beers where you may want to consider such a regiment are 1.120+ beers ( you could argue where to start this) but. . .
Beer generally carries enough nutrients from the grain so nutrients are not typically an issue.  Issues with big beers stem from mostly 4 issues (not necessarily in his order),

Not enough yeast
Not enough aeration
Too much Alcohol for the yeast
fermented too warm
Fred Bonjour
Co-Chair Mashing in Michigan 2014 AHA Conference in Grand Rapids, Michigan
AHA Governing Committee; AHA Conference, Club Support & Web Subcommittees



Everything under 1.100 is a 'session' beer ;)

Offline 1vertical

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Re: Supplimental nutrient addition for big gravity beer
« Reply #2 on: August 05, 2010, 07:07:29 AM »
Thanks Fred.  Session beer indeed! But at least I want it to be a good one. rolf.
I borrowed a medical oxygen tank and really, really put the O2 into the wert ...
Starter size was  a quart that made 3/4 of an inch of settled yeast in the bottom after the stirplate regimen.
Temp was kept in the 60's for 4 days before moving to the low 70's well within the yeast's parameters.

I would still like some answers to the questions I posted just to satisfy my overactive imagination. :-\

Hightest has really put a nice lot of info about this using mead.  I wondered how much of it carries over into
beer fermentation.
http://home.comcast.net/~mzapx1/FAQ/SNAddition.pdf
« Last Edit: August 05, 2010, 07:12:51 AM by 1vertical »
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Offline tom

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Re: Supplimental nutrient addition for big gravity beer
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 02:20:55 PM »
What Fred said.

Although it is important in mead or wine because they don't have enough nutrients on their own.
Brew on