Author Topic: milled grain  (Read 802 times)

Offline Pope of Dope

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milled grain
« on: January 29, 2018, 06:36:42 PM »
planning on brewing 12 lbs of 2 row I milled 3 weeks ago. It's been kept in a vacuumed Ziplock garment bag and in a cool dark space.  Should be fine right?
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Offline kramerog

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2018, 06:58:49 PM »
You're fine.

Offline denny

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2018, 07:20:25 PM »
Yep.  I've used grain milled 5 months before to make a pils.  Check this out, too....https://www.experimentalbrew.com/experiments/impact-crushed-malt-age-beer-quality
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Offline BrewBama

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milled grain
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2018, 11:43:15 AM »
A bunch of folks will tell you that the grain will oxidize and you should mill it just before use. A bunch of other folks will tell you it’s not a problem. After gathering information and evaluating your outcomes, you’ll have to choose which camp you fall into.


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Offline Philbrew

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2018, 05:31:52 AM »
Vacuumed and cool, I'll bet you're fine at 3 weeks.  I sure as hell wouldn't toss it.
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Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2018, 12:56:12 PM »
A bunch of folks will tell you that the grain will oxidize and you should mill it just before use. A bunch of other folks will tell you it’s not a problem. After gathering information and evaluating your outcomes, you’ll have to choose which camp you fall into.


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Why would milled grain oxidize faster than unmilled? I don't think that an un broken husk would be impervious to oxygen ingress. Would it?
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2018, 01:08:09 PM »
Why would milled grain oxidize faster than unmilled? I don't think that an un broken husk would be impervious to oxygen ingress. Would it?

Increased surface area.

One other distinction that should be is that there is no debate about whether or not the milled malt oxidizes, rather the issue at hand is whether or not that oxidation is noticeable. Heck, just about everything oxidizes on this planet...
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Offline Robert

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2018, 01:41:47 PM »
Another accelerator of oxidation is heat generated during milling.  For this reason the mill should always be run as slowly as possible.   Don't know the rate of this effect, but I've recently compared (I bake also) conventionally milled (roller) whole wheat flour and some milled on slow turning stone burrs, and in comparison you would never want to eat anything made from the former.  Bitter, sour, flavorless, rancid from oxidation of lipids. Malt will probably suffer much less, but there's something to this. Heat always accelerates oxidation.  (At the extreme, it's called "fire!")
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2018, 03:29:32 PM »
A bunch of folks will tell you that the grain will oxidize and you should mill it just before use. A bunch of other folks will tell you it’s not a problem. After gathering information and evaluating your outcomes, you’ll have to choose which camp you fall into.


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No but the husk isn't the only barrier between the air and the oxygen sensitive compounds inside.

Why would milled grain oxidize faster than unmilled? I don't think that an un broken husk would be impervious to oxygen ingress. Would it?
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Online The Beerery

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2018, 03:49:53 PM »
The thing you want to avoid which is LOX is stored in the arcospire of the malt, its tucked within the kernel pretty well. The moment that is crushed, it is allowed to touch oxygen and oxidation starts. It takes a little as 15 minutes for that process to happen.

Offline Frankenbrew

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2018, 02:05:23 PM »
Thanks! I get it now.
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Offline a10t2

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2018, 04:19:09 PM »
The thing you want to avoid which is LOX is stored in the arcospire of the malt

Obviously it couldn't be liquid oxygen, so what's LOX in this context?
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Offline Robert

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2018, 04:23:28 PM »
The thing you want to avoid which is LOX is stored in the arcospire of the malt

Obviously it couldn't be liquid oxygen, so what's LOX in this context?
Lipoxygenase.
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Offline Big Monk

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2018, 04:23:43 PM »
The thing you want to avoid which is LOX is stored in the arcospire of the malt

Obviously it couldn't be liquid oxygen, so what's LOX in this context?

Lipooxygenase
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Offline Nathan

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Re: milled grain
« Reply #14 on: February 02, 2018, 09:04:36 PM »
You should be fine I’ve gone as long as six months with no bad results if in doubt make a tea  stale or rancid grain is an easy flavour to distinguish


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