Author Topic: Using a part of your wort as 2nd step starter  (Read 319 times)

Offline Bjørn

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Using a part of your wort as 2nd step starter
« on: January 29, 2018, 09:18:32 PM »
Maybe I'm a bit cheap, but I typically buy one pure pitch packet of liquid yeast for a batch of 55-60 liters ale (14-15 gallons). I will buy two packets of liquid yeast for lagers. In Norway a packet of pure pitch yeast is about $12-15.

There is no way I will be able to make a starter from 1 packet of liquid yeast large enough for bath of 55-60 liters ale in one go. What I will do is make a regular starter using a 3 liter erlenmeyer flask and a stir plate. This starter will easily be large enough for a 20 liter bath (5 gallons).

I will then have a regular brew day and brew my 55-60 liters of wort (typical OG 1060 +/- 5). I will then pour 10 liters of wort into each of the two fermentation vessels (buckets or fermentasauruses [fermentasauri ::) ] ), total of 20 liters. I will oxygenate the wort and pitch the yeast starter (half in each of cause). The remaining 35 - 40 liters of wort I store refrigerated.

After 48 hours the yeast has produced  a good krausen. If the yeast is doing well I will boil and chill the remaining wort, oxygenate and pour half into each fermentation vessel. And then ferment as usual.

For me this is an easy and quite obvious way to do this, but I can't find any references to this method on the web nor in the literature. I have found that when doing high gravity beers a similar method is described.

Is there any reason why this method should produce a lower quality beer, or any reason not to use this method?


« Last Edit: January 29, 2018, 09:21:41 PM by Bjørn »

Offline FermentedCulture

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Re: Using a part of your wort as 2nd step starter
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2018, 09:58:33 PM »
This is basically double/triple/etc batch brewing or drauflassen. Most of the time this is done within 24 hours.

Reasons for not doing this is control of fermentation/repeatability. Adding oxygenated wort to your beer while it is fermenting can suppress the enzyme which creates esters, while not oxygenating it might increase esters to undesirable levels.

There's a few presentations and textbooks with information on the subject, most likely under drauflassen.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Using a part of your wort as 2nd step starter
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2018, 10:42:07 PM »
I would simply brew a smaller batch to start with and re-pitch the yeast cake into a larger batch/successive batches.  I don't know about putting beer through a second fermentation environment - it sounds like a potential problem, but I don't have any science to support it.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline flars

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Re: Using a part of your wort as 2nd step starter
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2018, 12:05:51 AM »
It seems complicated since I don't have refrigerator space to store 35 to 40 liters of wort.  I would start out with a large shaken not stirred starter in, (like), a large pickle jar.  When this starter fermented out split the yeast and step up using a second large pickle jar.  Containers for the starters don't even need to be glass.  Can be food safe plastic.

Offline Bjørn

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Re: Using a part of your wort as 2nd step starter
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2018, 12:41:35 PM »
This is basically double/triple/etc batch brewing or drauflassen. Most of the time this is done within 24 hours.

Reasons for not doing this is control of fermentation/repeatability. Adding oxygenated wort to your beer while it is fermenting can suppress the enzyme which creates esters, while not oxygenating it might increase esters to undesirable levels.

There's a few presentations and textbooks with information on the subject, most likely under drauflassen.

Thank you very much.  :D
It actually has a name! Drauflassen in german and double/triple/etc batch brewing in American brewing terminology.

This led to some good articles, thank you once again.  I believe I will change the practice of waiting for 48 hours before pitching the rest of the wort, to pitch it closer to 24 hour mark.