Author Topic: blow off  (Read 671 times)

Offline Pope of Dope

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blow off
« on: January 31, 2018, 07:18:19 PM »
I have a 6 gal glass carboy that I nearly topped off.  Probably only left 4 or 5 inches of head space in there. 2nd day into ferment and it's tumultuous and rising up the narrow neck. I duct taped the stopper and air lock down to the glass, but is there anything else I can do to prevent a blow off (other than going back in time)? And, what do I do if there is one (never had one before)?
I like that. Hmm Hmm. "I don't know," that's nice. 'Mr. Hand, will I pass this class?' 'Gee Mr. Spicoli, I don't know.' That's nice, I really like that. You know what I'm gonna do? I'm going to leave your words on my board for all my classes to enjoy, giving you full credit of course, Mr. Spicoli.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: blow off
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2018, 07:22:28 PM »
Bad idea, will just make the eruption more violent

If some is going to be ejected anyway, why not just rack some off to make room?

Offline Phil_M

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Re: blow off
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2018, 07:24:06 PM »
Fermcap-S, if you have a LHBS beat feet there ASAP. While you're there, get a blow off tube and just run that into a bucket of starsan.

Alternatively, if you're using a 3-peice airlock, just run a hose from it to a bucket of star san. Not ideal, but it'll work in a pinch.

WHATEVER YOU DO, get that duct tap off, you don't want pressure building in a glass carboy. Carboys are not designed to hold pressure...A little krausen is a lot easier to clean up than 6 gallons of wort AND krausen.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Pope of Dope

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Re: blow off
« Reply #3 on: February 01, 2018, 12:29:16 AM »
Fermcap-S, if you have a LHBS beat feet there ASAP. While you're there, get a blow off tube and just run that into a bucket of starsan.

Alternatively, if you're using a 3-peice airlock, just run a hose from it to a bucket of star san. Not ideal, but it'll work in a pinch.

WHATEVER YOU DO, get that duct tap off, you don't want pressure building in a glass carboy. Carboys are not designed to hold pressure...A little krausen is a lot easier to clean up than 6 gallons of wort AND krausen.


Ok duct tape is off and a racked about .5 gals out.  Now I have a nice foamy krausen sponge cake stuck up in the top of the vessel and the beer is down below, is this a problem? I am disappointed that my duct tape fix was not sufficient, I though duct tape could fix anything.  Thanks. 
I like that. Hmm Hmm. "I don't know," that's nice. 'Mr. Hand, will I pass this class?' 'Gee Mr. Spicoli, I don't know.' That's nice, I really like that. You know what I'm gonna do? I'm going to leave your words on my board for all my classes to enjoy, giving you full credit of course, Mr. Spicoli.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: blow off
« Reply #4 on: February 01, 2018, 12:31:10 AM »
You are fine now

Offline Robert

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Re: blow off
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2018, 12:42:59 AM »
My absolute ideal is to get the fermenter filled to a level so that the foam doesn't actually go out of, but just rises into, the blow off tube (so there's no loss of beer)  but the brown stuff sticks to the top of the fermenter when the foam dies down and doesn't sink back into the beer giving it harsh flavors.
Rob
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Pope of Dope

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Re: blow off
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2018, 12:53:14 AM »
My absolute ideal is to get the fermenter filled to a level so that the foam doesn't actually go out of, but just rises into, the blow off tube (so there's no loss of beer)  but the brown stuff sticks to the top of the fermenter when the foam dies down and doesn't sink back into the beer giving it harsh flavors.

Great.  It looks like that's what I'm going to get. 
I like that. Hmm Hmm. "I don't know," that's nice. 'Mr. Hand, will I pass this class?' 'Gee Mr. Spicoli, I don't know.' That's nice, I really like that. You know what I'm gonna do? I'm going to leave your words on my board for all my classes to enjoy, giving you full credit of course, Mr. Spicoli.

Offline Robert

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Re: blow off
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2018, 12:55:15 AM »
My absolute ideal is to get the fermenter filled to a level so that the foam doesn't actually go out of, but just rises into, the blow off tube (so there's no loss of beer)  but the brown stuff sticks to the top of the fermenter when the foam dies down and doesn't sink back into the beer giving it harsh flavors.

Great.  It looks like that's what I'm going to get.
Well you did lose a little already, right? But now you know exactly where the magic fill line is!
Rob
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: blow off
« Reply #8 on: February 01, 2018, 01:09:14 AM »
My absolute ideal is to get the fermenter filled to a level so that the foam doesn't actually go out of, but just rises into, the blow off tube (so there's no loss of beer)  but the brown stuff sticks to the top of the fermenter when the foam dies down and doesn't sink back into the beer giving it harsh flavors.

This is part of why I'd like to move to open fermentation. Plenty of documentation that both British and German brewers sought to remove that crud. (Brits via open fermentation and running off the excess yeast.)
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Robert

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Re: blow off
« Reply #9 on: February 01, 2018, 01:23:59 AM »
My absolute ideal is to get the fermenter filled to a level so that the foam doesn't actually go out of, but just rises into, the blow off tube (so there's no loss of beer)  but the brown stuff sticks to the top of the fermenter when the foam dies down and doesn't sink back into the beer giving it harsh flavors.

This is part of why I'd like to move to open fermentation. Plenty of documentation that both British and German brewers sought to remove that crud. (Brits via open fermentation and running off the excess yeast.)
Yeah, I don't like the idea of most homebrew conicals for this reason.  They're designed with headspace to avoid hittong the roof! Commercial ones can be equipped with internal skimmers.  I've  also read that some breweries aim to do what I do, hit the fill level that leaves the "Braunhefe" on the roof of the fermenter.  I have pretty good luck with my method in a carboy, although I do lagers and in the first couple of generations the yeast don't tend to give quite enough of a head.  (I think the Brits, like the Germans, now pretty much use conicals with vacuum skimmers.)
Rob
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: blow off
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2018, 01:42:17 AM »
I know that Samuel Smith's uses open fermentation and skimmers. I believe there are a few more Yorkshire breweries that do likewise. (Samuel Smiths is also NOT low oxygen. In fact, watching a brew on their Victorian brewhouse would likely give a brewing with low O2 goals fits.)

I bought a SS Brewtech brew bucket just before my hiatus from brewing. Still haven't used it, but it seems the best of both worlds: conical bottom, easily removable lid for skimming. Goal would be to skim yeast/aerate the wort at least daily, if that doesn't provide the right results I'll move to open fermentation.

A former regular on here, S. Cerevisiae, used to talk about how many British strains have such high oxygen requirements that they won't fully ferment a beer, and as such aren't marketed to home brewers. The goal is to get to the point where these yeast can be used. (White Labs Cask Ale is one, if I remember correctly. They basically refused to sell it to home brewers when I emailed them about it, citing that it only comes in microbrewery-sized packaging. I said that's fine, I'll culture it from there, they still said no. Oh well.)
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Robert

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Re: blow off
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2018, 01:59:08 AM »
I know that Samuel Smith's uses open fermentation and skimmers. I believe there are a few more Yorkshire breweries that do likewise. (Samuel Smiths is also NOT low oxygen. In fact, watching a brew on their Victorian brewhouse would likely give a brewing with low O2 goals fits.)

I bought a SS Brewtech brew bucket just before my hiatus from brewing. Still haven't used it, but it seems the best of both worlds: conical bottom, easily removable lid for skimming. Goal would be to skim yeast/aerate the wort at least daily, if that doesn't provide the right results I'll move to open fermentation.

A former regular on here, S. Cerevisiae, used to talk about how many British strains have such high oxygen requirements that they won't fully ferment a beer, and as such aren't marketed to home brewers. The goal is to get to the point where these yeast can be used. (White Labs Cask Ale is one, if I remember correctly. They basically refused to sell it to home brewers when I emailed them about it, citing that it only comes in microbrewery-sized packaging. I said that's fine, I'll culture it from there, they still said no. Oh well.)
You are the ideal guy for open fermentation or opening up to skim, as I know you like judicious amounts of oxidation. Most homebrewers would probably find it either gives too much 02 or poses other risks.  Any guy serving out of a pin ought to go full on old school Brit!

I don't know about availability in your area, but do you know Samuel Smith Yorkshire Stingo?  (It's no longer handled by the OH distributor, and they have non-comps so that it can't be ordered here online!)  It's an 8%ish ale, $11ish a 550ml bottle.  Cask aged for a year+ before bottle conditioning.  If you can get it, by all means do.  It's a wonderful ale, and if you're lucky you just might be able to culture the dregs!
Rob
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: blow off
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2018, 11:00:52 AM »
Open fermentation won't be an oxidation issue if done properly. Also, the beer should be racked to secondary (the cask, secondary is only worth it if you're carbing/and or adding something like fruit or bugs) before fermentation is complete. Sound familiar to spunding? Only difference is you add a dose of priming of some sort and finings.

I have not seen Stingo in my area. Sadly Sam Smith's is a rather neglected brand in my area. I watch their section of shelves like a hawk, bust most of what I find is pretty old. A little oxidation is OK in a British, a lot is terrible. I recently had one of their beers that was undrinkable, a chocolate stout so oxidized that it tasted like how stale pipe tobacco smells.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Robert

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Re: blow off
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2018, 01:17:41 PM »
Open fermentation won't be an oxidation issue if done properly. Also, the beer should be racked to secondary (the cask, secondary is only worth it if you're carbing/and or adding something like fruit or bugs) before fermentation is complete. Sound familiar to spunding? Only difference is you add a dose of priming of some sort and finings.

I have not seen Stingo in my area. Sadly Sam Smith's is a rather neglected brand in my area. I watch their section of shelves like a hawk, bust most of what I find is pretty old. A little oxidation is OK in a British, a lot is terrible. I recently had one of their beers that was undrinkable, a chocolate stout so oxidized that it tasted like how stale pipe tobacco smells.
Sam's has definitely declined in profile here too.  And their fruit beers get most of the remaining shelf space! (Exposure to Pale Ale and Taddy Porter when I was still technically underage probably saved me from wasting my whole youth drinking Old Milwaukee.) What surprised me is that Stingo got pulled around the time the new breed of wood aged beers was on the rise -- I'd think there would be a market for an original. You could try to find some online -- that's how I found it can't be shipped to Ohio. Thought I had a solution, but that wiley beverage distribution company foiled me!
Rob
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: blow off
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2018, 01:20:00 PM »
And their fruit beers get most of the remaining shelf space!

Holy crap yes, and nobody ever buys them, judging by the amount of dust on the bottles...
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.