Author Topic: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"  (Read 1572 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« on: March 04, 2018, 06:38:06 AM »
I propose the IMF! International Maltiness Factor. For too long, hops have been dominating the market of "numerical defining" in beer with the ubiquitous IBU. Numerically defining water elements in ppm is a distant second. Who cares about yeast, right? I mean, you can always point to cell counting, but really... it's yeast. It actually doesn't count.

What about the mighty malt? Do we care so little that we are satisfied by simple word descriptions like 'backbone', or 'balance', or simply 'malty'. The very well trained beer nerd might stun us from time to time with descriptors like 'biscuity', or 'carmely', or 'nutty', but doesn't that just fall way short of the imperical ring of solid numbers? I say it's time! Nay, beyond time, when you can look at a beer menu and see ABV, IBU, and the IMF!

We need someone to step forward and take up this call for justice. A complex formula must be developed. How much of what kinds of grains. Each grain must first be analyzed of course, to create data points to draw from. After determining that, computations must be tested and developed to determine how those grain combinations react against all of the possible different water combinations. Then further adjustment computations to adapt to varying hop bitterness, flavors, and aromas. And finally, all of those possible outcomes must be data crunched as to how each possible yeast might effect the International Maltiness Factor at various possible fermentation temps. We would ultimately arrive at the final, indisputable, perfected IMF!

No more surprises when building a recipe! No more fretting when ordering a beer at your local pub! "How malty is the Neepa?" "Well sir, it has a balanced biscuity backbone." Bologna! Everyone needs to know exactly what they are getting, every time. With a number! Let's be honest here, if we don't have a scientifically derived number to look at, there's really no way to know precisely what maltiness we are actually tasting.

By the way, the IBU goes to 100, so I suggest that the IMF should go to 101! Though in fairness, we will never award an IMF above 100, the IMF 101 should remain sacred for only mythical beers. And we should never go below a courtesy IMF of 13.

Humbly submitted for your consideration

Perhaps once this is implemented we can finally find a decent malty beer in this country
« Last Edit: March 04, 2018, 09:53:00 AM by klickitat jim »

Offline tumarkin

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2018, 12:13:12 PM »
awesome, Jim, and for this post you get awarded a can of Pabst Blue Ribbon Malt!
Mark Tumarkin
Hogtown Brewers
Gainesville, FL

Offline Bob357

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2018, 01:06:15 PM »
I would guess that the ABV of what ya been drinkin' had more influence on this post than the IMF:)
Beer is my bucket list,

Bob357
Fallon, NV

Offline dls5492

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2018, 01:09:27 PM »
klickitat jim,
You speak for a nation!
David S.
Cedar Falls, IA
Club: Cedar River Association of Zymurgy Enthusiasts (CRAZE)

And the Lord is the Spirit; and where the Spirit of the Lord is, there is liberty. II Cor. 3:17

Offline Robert

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2018, 01:11:02 PM »
Any coffee left in your town, Jim? That's just a stunning piece of work.  And you even spelled Bologna correctly!

I've always regarded malt as THE defining characteristic of beer.  Beer is after all a "malt liquor" in the words of the really old writers (centuries before Colt 45.) 

The Czechs have always said that the taste of beer is the taste of malt, and that hops are like the bay leaf in the soup:  you'd notice if it was missing, but you shouldn't notice it's there. 

So I've blindly considered that an inverse approach to IBU was a way of characterizing maltiness:  low IBU is malty beer.  But of course I'm wrong, as IBU fails to define hoppiness even.  Czech lager can have all the IBU in bitterness with no appreciable flavor or aroma, and even  little perception of bitterness given soft water;  Knee-Pa can have low IBU and tons of hops masking any other characteristic. So you're really up against it, Jim: if for all their manic obsession and all the research devoted to the subject hopheads can't really quantify hoppiness,  what effort will do it for malt? Or will maltiness prove easier to quantify, because it is expressed at a constant level, that is, you don't have to account for the effects of multiple additions as with hops? 

If nothing else, even a failed campaign to develop the IMF should serve to refocus attention and restore some sanity in the beer world.  Three cheers, and where do I send my donation to endow the Klickitat Jim Chair in Quantum Maltimetrics at UC Davis?

Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Online dmtaylor

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #5 on: March 04, 2018, 01:32:18 PM »
I'm a rare American malthead.  I love malt.  Maltheads don't need numbers.  If it tastes good, we drink it.

That being said, the closest thing we can get to a malthead number that I know of is to aim for a BU:GU ratio lower than about 0.35.  Yum.  Now that's a malty beer.

Cheers.  I appreciate Jim's humor as always.  :)
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline BrewBama

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #6 on: March 04, 2018, 01:52:38 PM »
 


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Offline riceral

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #7 on: March 04, 2018, 01:54:42 PM »

We need someone to step forward and take up this call for justice.


After such an impassioned plea and rational argument, I propose Jim take up this challenge.  ;)
Ralph R.

Offline flars

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #8 on: March 04, 2018, 02:20:06 PM »
After the voluntary regulation is in place will all maltsters be required to use an international malty scale?  Individual maltsters using a numbering scale to define the relative maltiness of just their products would defeat the purpose for recipe development unless you only used malts from one maltster.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2018, 03:00:17 PM »
IMFs from base malts, crystals, roast, adjuncts - it could be limitless!

But so much more meaning than IBUs!
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline tommymorris

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #10 on: March 04, 2018, 03:13:05 PM »
Numbers taste good!

Offline oginme

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #11 on: March 04, 2018, 04:28:30 PM »
Yup!  What we really need is another calculated value to argue over the applicability and meaningfulness of.   :o

Offline Wilbur

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2018, 05:12:36 PM »
I've always regarded malt as THE defining characteristic of beer.  Beer is after all a "malt liquor" in the words of the really old writers (centuries before Colt 45.) 

The Czechs have always said that the taste of beer is the taste of malt, and that hops are like the bay leaf in the soup:  you'd notice if it was missing, but you shouldn't notice it's there.

I've said this before, but everyone's made mistakes and we shouldn't hold it against them.

I guess all you really need to do is make a few videos where you try and buy breweries. Lets see, you'll have to start with:

Quote
1. Russian River Pliny the Elder
2. Bell’s Two Hearted Ale
3. The Alchemist Heady Topper
4. Ballast Point Sculpin IPA
5. Ballast Point Grapefruit Sculpin
6. Founders Breakfast Stout
7. Three Floyds Zombie Dust
8. Bell’s Hopslam
9. Goose Island Bourbon County Brand Stout
T10. Deschutes Fresh Squeezed IPA
T10. Stone Enjoy By IPA

That should be a good start...

Offline Richard

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2018, 10:19:16 PM »
I had to check the calendar first to make sure it wasn't April 1, but I agree with Jim. And if anyone makes a highly hopped Amber Ale, we should take away their mash paddle first and give them due process later.
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: IMF "International Maltiness Factor"
« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2018, 11:11:01 PM »
TPL (total potential maltiness) = grams of malt per liter finished beer

IBU (which ever metric you prefer) because hopping reduces perceived maltiness

SRM÷2  because color increases perception of maltiness, but it's not linear

TPL ÷ IBU × SRM/2 = RMF (Raw Maltiness Factor)

If RMF is greater than 100:
RMF - Max IMF (100) equals CF (Correction Factor)
RMF - CF = IMF

If RMF is less than 13, just use IMF 13. The IMF is not mean spirited.

FAQs:

Q: Why no calculation concerning Yeast/Fermentation effects?

A: Because without any Malt the yeast would just lay there asking stupid questions. So, any flavors that might be thought to originate with yeast are actually from malt.

Q: Why no calculation concerning unmalted grains, or adjuncts?

A: Some things require a higher level of understanding, and you're just not there yet. Roll with it, and one day it will come to you.

Q: Why not just describe the maltiness of beer using words?

A: Who let this moron in here? No further questions!
« Last Edit: March 04, 2018, 11:17:00 PM by klickitat jim »