Author Topic: New to Kegging  (Read 457 times)

Offline chrsbrmn

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New to Kegging
« on: March 18, 2018, 11:19:55 PM »
I am new to kegging and believe I ran into an issue.  When force carbonating my batch at the recommended temp (37 degrees) and pressure (10 psi) for 3 to 5 days I ran out of CO2.  I am not sure when my tank went dry but on day 5 when I started to pour nothing came out.  So, I had my tank refilled and started over.  I am on day 2 now and have been testing it everyday.  It is obviously not fully carbonated yet but I am tasting a little bit of "keg" or "new metal" in the beer.  I also got a headache soon after the taste.  Is my beer ruined?  Is it safe to wait out the next few days to reach full carbonation?  Is it possible that my beer is saturated in co2 and possibly ruined?  Any advise would be helpful.  Thanks fellow homebrewers.

Offline brew inspector01

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2018, 01:45:08 AM »
Well first it sounds like you had a leak somewhere.  Check your connections and seal on the keg. You can use Star San or soapy water along connections to find it.

As for the metal taste... I am assuming these are new to you kegs. Did you clean them prior to filling? If so how? There could have been residual substances in the kegs being new, reconditioned or just used.

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Offline chrsbrmn

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2018, 02:38:07 AM »
brew inspector01 -

your right, when I changed the co2 tanks out I noticed my ball-lock connections were not secure.  I re-fitted the connections and re-clamped them.  All is good now as I did check them using Star San.  The keg is new from Northern Brewer and I cleaned it using just an oxy-clean soak, no scrub and then a couple minutes of Star San soak. Thank you for your reply.   

Offline brew inspector01

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2018, 10:33:22 PM »
In that case finish the carb process and then see how it tastes.  Just as with bottling, they may be harsh at first and smooth out with some age. Could have just been the early harshness and your own mind thinking metal.

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Offline tld6008

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #4 on: March 20, 2018, 07:44:19 PM »
You need 2 weeks @ 10psi to carbonate. Spray top of keg with soapy water or starsan with pressure inside to look for leaks (bubbles).

Offline BrewBama

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #5 on: March 20, 2018, 09:50:26 PM »
Here’s some reading material for your future brew: http://brulosophy.com/methods/carbonation-methods/


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Offline chrsbrmn

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2018, 02:06:29 AM »
Thank you guys for the information.  I really appreciate it.  I upped the co2 pressure to 15 PSI the other night and tested it today.  The higher pressure is working faster and I am starting to see carbonation (finally).  It is also mellowing out the "mineral" or "new keg" taste I was getting earlier.  I just didn't realize 10 psi would take 2 weeks.  I thought I read 3 to 5 days somewhere.  Now I know.  I found the article extremely valuable and look forward to kegging my next brew with a lot more confidence.   

Offline juggabrew303

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Re: New to Kegging
« Reply #7 on: March 23, 2018, 04:04:53 AM »
10 psi is not force carbing.  Myself, like a lot of others assume when you say force carb you mean setting the PSI at 30 for 24 hrs and then lowering to 12ish psi.  Beer will be carbed in 2 days.  The 10-12psi will be your serving pressure. 


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