Author Topic: recirculate mash?  (Read 1220 times)

Offline zman51

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recirculate mash?
« on: March 21, 2018, 06:51:31 PM »
Hey All,

I have been all grain for a while now and after mash time, I typically send that straight to brew kettle. I read a little about I should recirculate the mash a bit before sending to brew kettle? If true what is this doing?


thx

Z
« Last Edit: March 21, 2018, 07:13:30 PM by zman51 »

Offline yso191

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2018, 06:59:23 PM »
I *think* that is about setting the grain bed so it filters better.  I don't worry about it, I filter the wort coming out of the MT with a fine mesh bag.
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Offline mabrungard

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2018, 07:59:42 PM »
There are lipids and other constituents that you don't want getting into your kettle and subsequent beer. It is highly recommended that you recirculate your wort until the discharge is clear. Turbid wort is a no-no.
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Offline Robert

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2018, 08:52:56 PM »
There are lipids and other constituents that you don't want getting into your kettle and subsequent beer. It is highly recommended that you recirculate your wort until the discharge is clear. Turbid wort is a no-no.
+1
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Offline yso191

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2018, 09:15:19 PM »
There are lipids and other constituents that you don't want getting into your kettle and subsequent beer. It is highly recommended that you recirculate your wort until the discharge is clear. Turbid wort is a no-no.

What is the consequence to the beer if this is not done?
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Offline Robert

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2018, 09:47:55 PM »
There are lipids and other constituents that you don't want getting into your kettle and subsequent beer. It is highly recommended that you recirculate your wort until the discharge is clear. Turbid wort is a no-no.

What is the consequence to the beer if this is not done?
Among other things, lipids lead to rapid oxidative staling and are detrimental to foam.  Bits of husk in the boil contribute to astringency due to  excess tannins, which also lead to rapid oxidative staling and haze.  These are just the big bullet points.  In short, clear wort is essential to fresh tasting, clear beer with good foam and mouthfeel.  The same goes for wort post-boil going into the fermenter; trub should be separated. I'm sure someone will elaborate.
Rob
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Online BrewBama

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recirculate mash?
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2018, 10:57:15 PM »
I use a fine mesh bag as well. The wort doesn’t get any cleaner between the moment I open the valve to recirculating fornever.


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« Last Edit: March 21, 2018, 11:02:02 PM by BrewBama »
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Offline Robert

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2018, 12:02:54 AM »
I use a fine mesh bag as well. The wort doesn’t get any cleaner between the moment I open the valve to recirculating fornever.


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I lauter the conventional way with a false bottom.  I have to recirculate very briefly before it runs clear.  Many European breweries now filter the wort into and out of the boil.  I guess you guys with fine mesh are doing the same thing. As long as it runs clear, that's what matters.
Rob
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Offline Richard

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2018, 12:18:16 AM »
What about people who Brew in a Bag? There is a mesh bag, perhaps fine or perhaps not, but not really any chance to see whether the wort is running clear or not. Same question applies to automated brewing systems which have metal mesh inserts for the grains.

Offline Robert

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #9 on: March 22, 2018, 12:31:01 AM »
What about people who Brew in a Bag? There is a mesh bag, perhaps fine or perhaps not, but not really any chance to see whether the wort is running clear or not. Same question applies to automated brewing systems which have metal mesh inserts for the grains.
To me, this inability to guarantee crystal clear wort seems like a potentially fatal flaw in these systems.  I've never considered using them, but I guess you'd have to weigh your goals,  wort/beer quality vs. some other considerations, unless you can somehow get clear wort in these systems.  (Frankly I can't understand the apppeal of these things.  Conventional setup is cheaper, faster, and easier to clean up in my experience, and gives high quality and high efficiency.  But that's me.)
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Offline Big Monk

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #10 on: March 22, 2018, 12:40:04 AM »
Among other things, lipids lead to rapid oxidative staling and are detrimental to foam.  Bits of husk in the boil contribute to astringency due to  excess tannins, which also lead to rapid oxidative staling and haze.  These are just the big bullet points.  In short, clear wort is essential to fresh tasting, clear beer with good foam and mouthfeel.  The same goes for wort post-boil going into the fermenter; trub should be separated. I'm sure someone will elaborate.

What about people who Brew in a Bag? There is a mesh bag, perhaps fine or perhaps not, but not really any chance to see whether the wort is running clear or not. Same question applies to automated brewing systems which have metal mesh inserts for the grains.
To me, this inability to guarantee crystal clear wort seems like a potentially fatal flaw in these systems.  I've never considered using them, but I guess you'd have to weigh your goals,  wort/beer quality vs. some other considerations, unless you can somehow get clear wort in these systems.  (Frankly I can't understand the apppeal of these things.  Conventional setup is cheaper, faster, and easier to clean up in my experience, and gives high quality and high efficiency.  But that's me.)

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Offline tommymorris

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #11 on: March 22, 2018, 01:01:15 AM »
I do BIAB with a bag. There are no husks in my wort. Not sure about lipids.

Offline Robert

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #12 on: March 22, 2018, 01:17:26 AM »
I find very fine husk particles make it through even a well set grain bed.  They collect at the bottom of my "grant" (bucket the tube from lauter tun goes into) so I can carefully run the clear wort off into the kettle leaving them behind.  If your mesh bag is fine enough it might exclude them.  Other substances are fine and light enough they might squeeze through.  But they are also most effectively left as "top dough" on recirculation and excluded from a lautered wort.  Again, I don't know how effectively they might be filtered by a bag.  (Thise "malt pipes" would worry me.) You can always sample your wort in a glass.  If it's clear, good.  If it's at all cloudy, not so good.
Rob
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #13 on: March 22, 2018, 01:35:52 AM »
I don’t own one, but, Grainfather and Robobrew recirculate. I have seen videos with people remarking about how clear the wort is.

Offline Robert

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Re: recirculate mash?
« Reply #14 on: March 22, 2018, 01:50:45 AM »
Whatever gets the job done.  Recirculation, filtering, whatever works, clear wort is what matters.
Rob
Akron, Ohio

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