Author Topic: Poor Weld Job in Brew Pot  (Read 2218 times)

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Poor Weld Job in Brew Pot
« Reply #15 on: April 13, 2018, 02:44:14 AM »
One of my club members has been employing silver-soldering with stainless fittings for his stainless vessels. He says there are special fittings that are intended for this use and then work well. Of course, proper surface prep and fluxing is required along with the proper silver solder.

Since the temperature of your kettle can't exceed about 212F, its never close to a temperature where the solder could melt again. If I ever consider upgrading my kettle, silver soldering will be under consideration.

This is some great advice.  I've been looking into this technique and it looks like it creates a clean finish (as good as TIG), a solid connection, and is food safe.

I might need to find some stainless steel to practice on.  I like the idea of being able to attach my own permanent fittings and bulk heads.  I don't like being dependent on someone else for things like this, because usually, they don't have the same standards as me.  With the entry cost to TIG welding and also needing to teach myself or take classes on TIG welding, it's been a pipe-dream to consider.  Silver soldering looks like a relatively cheap and easy skill to learn with great results.

+1

The ONLY reason I invested in an inverter TIG machine is cars and drag racing are my other hobby. Simply for home brewing, there is absolutely NO reason to buy a welder these days. Save your money for something else.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Saccharomyces

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Re: Poor Weld Job in Brew Pot
« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2021, 11:37:30 PM »

This is some great advice.  I've been looking into this technique and it looks like it creates a clean finish (as good as TIG), a solid connection, and is food safe.

If we are talking about Harris #8 silver solder, than the connection has nowhere near the shear strength of a brazed connection.   For most purposes when dealing with thin stainless, silver brazing in the 1100F temperature range provides a connection that will outlast a brewer.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2021, 09:22:05 PM by Saccharomyces »