Author Topic: Wild hops  (Read 459 times)

Offline Brewtopalonian

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Wild hops
« on: April 01, 2018, 04:01:54 PM »
Hey all!

I just bought some hops rhyzomes from a local farmer (Salt Lake Valley, UT).  I bought a couple of Cascade and a wild hop he found and has been reproducing.  He's named it Harvard, after the street he found it on.  He says he thinks is Centennial, but doesn't know for sure, is there a good way to find out more about it?  Should I just experiment with it or is there a lab I can send it to?  I'm excited to brew with it this fall.  He said it grows REALLY good here under natural conditions (no watering or soil treatment), which seems so odd to me considering I live in a desert.  Anyway, thanks for your input as always.
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Offline reverseapachemaster

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2018, 01:19:13 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.
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Offline denny

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #2 on: April 02, 2018, 06:25:09 PM »
The only certain way to know would be a DNA test.
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Offline denny

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #3 on: April 02, 2018, 06:27:08 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2018, 02:35:56 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.
To reinforce that, during the hop shortage of 2008, Argentinian Cascades were found to be available and breweries and homebrewers found them. The general comment was that they were not like Cascade hops from the PNW, but were more herbal and noble hop like.
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Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2018, 12:35:30 AM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.
Can you describe them?
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Offline denny

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2018, 04:35:53 PM »
Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.
Can you describe them?

I haven't tried them personally, but I understand they are much more herbal than the same rhizomes grown here.  They call them "Tehiki" (sp.?) so as not to mislead people.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline bayareabrewer

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2018, 07:48:02 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.

isnt  madarina bavaria just cascade grown in germany?

Offline denny

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2018, 07:56:26 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.

isnt  madarina bavaria just cascade grown in germany?

Cascade was one part, at least.  I don't know if they crossed it with anything else.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Wild hops
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2018, 08:16:37 PM »
Growing and brewing with it will be the easiest test. Centennial is not too hard to distinguish. As it starts to grow you can also compare pictures of the plants. Some hop plants have distinguishing features.

Since hops are very terrior dependent, even if it was Centennial it might have none of the character usually associated with Centennial. I just returned from New Zealand, where they grow Cascade from rhizomes from the US.  It's so entirely different from our Cascade that they had to give it another name.  You would never recognize it as Cascade.

isnt  madarina bavaria just cascade grown in germany?

That would be Hallertau Cascade, which is grown and used in the German Craft PA and IPAs. The first link has a nice article by Stan Hieronymus, showing how Cascade changes as to location.

Mandarina Bavaria was developed by the Hüll Hop Research Institute, Cascade was the Mother. More information in the second link.

http://appellationbeer.com/blog/cascade-a-study-in-hop-terroir/

https://www.hopsteiner.com/variety-data-sheets/Mandarina-Bavaria/
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