Author Topic: Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers  (Read 318 times)

Offline estrauss

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Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers
« on: September 20, 2018, 08:42:16 PM »
At some point in your brewing career you are going to become interested in taking your water chemistry to the next level.  As part of that, you might come to the realization that you want to improve the quality of your water and stop using the water from a garden hose or you might want to cut down on the inconvenience of having to go to the store to get your water.  I had waited a long time to do it, but I've had my system installed for 2 years now and I don't regret the expense one bit.

I put together a guide on reverse osmosis systems detailing
  • The basic components of a RO (Reverse Osmosis) system
  • Some of the considerations when choosing a system
  • A brief explanation of how they work
  • How I chose to install my system

Here is a link to the full guide:

http://fermware.com/reverse-osmosis-system-installation/


« Last Edit: September 20, 2018, 08:56:52 PM by estrauss »

Offline rtcasey

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Re: Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2018, 01:44:56 AM »
This is awesome.  Thank you!

Offline estrauss

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Re: Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2018, 11:30:58 AM »
Thanks!  I hope it helps.

Offline hmbrewing

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Re: Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2018, 12:29:54 PM »
The one thing that keeps me from a RO system is the amount of "waste" water that goes down the drain. Doesn't it take 3 - 4 gallons of water just to make 1 gallon of RO? I'm having a hard time getting around that and have just been buying distilled water at .89 per gallon knowing I'll use every last drop. Plus - doesn't it take hours to even collect enough water to brew with? I tend to shy away from anything that increases my prep time for brew day.

I could be looking at this all wrong. Also - my "facts" that I listed above could be myths? If so - straighten me out!
I brew beer, I drink beer...it really is that simple

Offline estrauss

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Re: Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers
« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2018, 04:47:38 PM »
The number I referenced is 2.5 gallons for every gallon produced.  I did not measure to verify that value.  What I've learned since posting is that different system pressures can alter the amount of waste water.

If you search the internet, there are lots of good ideas on how to re-use the wastewater.  Mostly the use looks to be for watering your garden and also supplementing it with tap water to reduce the concentration of what the RO system has just removed.

There are different levels of waste in everything we do, you just need to decide what's best.  Driving to get the water, the disposable or recycled containers, the wastewater from the system at your house, the wastewater at the plant that made the store water.  It could go on.

Offline hmbrewing

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Re: Guide to Reverse Osmosis Systems for Homebrewers
« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2018, 06:35:48 PM »
The number I referenced is 2.5 gallons for every gallon produced.  I did not measure to verify that value.  What I've learned since posting is that different system pressures can alter the amount of waste water.

If you search the internet, there are lots of good ideas on how to re-use the wastewater.  Mostly the use looks to be for watering your garden and also supplementing it with tap water to reduce the concentration of what the RO system has just removed.

There are different levels of waste in everything we do, you just need to decide what's best.  Driving to get the water, the disposable or recycled containers, the wastewater from the system at your house, the wastewater at the plant that made the store water.  It could go on.

Yeah, that's definitely a good way to look at it. Great perspective!
I brew beer, I drink beer...it really is that simple