Author Topic: One brew that is a must.  (Read 995 times)

Offline Brewmeisters

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One brew that is a must.
« on: May 02, 2018, 04:42:18 AM »
Just bottled our last two batches this past week.
First brew was a Russian Imperial Stout.
Then, Imperial Blonde Ale - this is the best one yet. Definitely a keeper for the fridge.
Honey wheat
A Belgian Saison.
Have a Daredevil IPA - in a one gallon fermenting.
Have a Irish Red to brew, but what is the one beer that everyone should brew, just once?

When you brew, brew with a happy heart.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #1 on: May 02, 2018, 09:55:18 AM »
A 1920's mild in the low 3% range. There's no better beer for enjoying with friends, and if you keg you can easily psuedo-cask it.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline erockrph

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #2 on: May 02, 2018, 04:48:27 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline case thrower

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2018, 07:57:05 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Dave C.

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The future's uncertain and the end is alway near.

Offline Robert

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2018, 08:22:27 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Invert sugars, nos. 1-4, are invert syrups of varying colors (ranging from 16-325 SRM) used in British beers. Ron's book The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer gives directions for manufacturing these. It's not just sugar, and is also not the same as Belgian candi syrups (which add distinctive flavors as well as color.)
« Last Edit: May 02, 2018, 08:24:49 PM by Robert »
Rob Stein
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Offline Robert

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #5 on: May 02, 2018, 08:23:45 PM »

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.
+1
Rob Stein
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Offline case thrower

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #6 on: May 02, 2018, 08:39:56 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Invert sugars, nos. 1-4, are invert syrups of varying colors (ranging from 16-325 SRM) used in British beers. Ron's book The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer gives directions for manufacturing these. It's not just sugar, and is also not the same as Belgian candi syrups (which add distinctive flavors as well as color.)

Thanks.  I'll check it out.
Dave C.

Woke up this mornin' and I got myself a beer.
The future's uncertain and the end is alway near.

Offline rburrelli

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #7 on: May 02, 2018, 09:47:34 PM »
I favor a good Pilsner.  Bohemian or even American.
Just sitting here learning what I can....

Offline Brewmeisters

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #8 on: May 02, 2018, 11:26:59 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.


I was just talking about how beer would have tasted a hundred years ago.
There was limited availability of resources, money as well.
You made beer from what you could grow, or use a little of the excess crop.
I figured is wan't too high in ABV, or very clear, either.


I'm going to check out these vintage brews and see what's out there.
When you brew, brew with a happy heart.

Offline ethinson

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2018, 12:00:12 PM »
Just bottled our last two batches this past week.
First brew was a Russian Imperial Stout.
Then, Imperial Blonde Ale - this is the best one yet. Definitely a keeper for the fridge.
Honey wheat
A Belgian Saison.
Have a Daredevil IPA - in a one gallon fermenting.
Have a Irish Red to brew, but what is the one beer that everyone should brew, just once?

The easy answer is of course "brew whatever you want", probably straight from Joy of Homebrewing, but for the sake of actually answering the question.

Rather than one classic style that everyone should make like a pale ale or a stout, I'm going to flip the question on it's side a little and focus on the "just once" caveat. 

I think, just once, everyone should brew something "weird".  Something non-traditional (by North American/European standards).  A beer from Asia, Africa, South America.  A beer that uses an alternate sugar like honey, molasses, sorghum etc.  A beer that uses fruit or spices.  Go wild.  That's the beauty of small batches, you can be really creative.  It might turn out great, it might turn out awful.  You might love it, you might hate it, but I guarantee you'll learn something.  Next time you want to use honey or grapefruit in a beer, maybe in a smaller quantity, you'll know what it does.  Even if then end result doesn't turn out, playing with ingredients is always a good way to learn processes.
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Offline Brewmeisters

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #10 on: May 03, 2018, 01:08:06 PM »
Hahahaha!!

I did that once, the airlock was 20’ away! A geyser of beer landed on the ceiling!



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Offline erockrph

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #11 on: May 04, 2018, 02:26:42 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Invert sugars, nos. 1-4, are invert syrups of varying colors (ranging from 16-325 SRM) used in British beers. Ron's book The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer gives directions for manufacturing these. It's not just sugar, and is also not the same as Belgian candi syrups (which add distinctive flavors as well as color.)

Thanks.  I'll check it out.
For this recipe I generally use Lyle's Golden Syrup for the invert. I don't know if it's the exact same as the light colored invert sugars, but that's generally what I use when a recipe calls for a light invert sugar.
Eric B.

Finally got around to starting a homebrewing blog: The Hop Whisperer

Offline case thrower

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #12 on: May 04, 2018, 10:08:51 PM »
Any historical recipe from Ron Pattinson. This is one of my personal favorites:

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/2016/02/lets-brew-wednesday-1957-whitbread-ipa.html

This is leaps and bounds better than any "Session IPA" being produced by US craft breweries right now, and at 1.036 it is really easy to make it disappear by the liter.

My second choice is an adjunct lager or cream ale. Once you have a dozen or so brews under your belt and are making good beer, you will be amazed at how flavorful and enjoyable the style can be when you're not trying to intentionally make it taste like water.

Not trying to hijack the thread, but I've got a quick question on the '57 Whitbread recipe.  In the description, Pattinson says No.1 Invert and the recipe calls for No.1 sugar.  Is this simply table sugar?  Or is there something 'special' about it?
Invert sugars, nos. 1-4, are invert syrups of varying colors (ranging from 16-325 SRM) used in British beers. Ron's book The Home Brewer's Guide to Vintage Beer gives directions for manufacturing these. It's not just sugar, and is also not the same as Belgian candi syrups (which add distinctive flavors as well as color.)

Thanks.  I'll check it out.
For this recipe I generally use Lyle's Golden Syrup for the invert. I don't know if it's the exact same as the light colored invert sugars, but that's generally what I use when a recipe calls for a light invert sugar.

I'll keep that in mind but I went on youtube and found a couple of videos on making invert sugar that gave me what should be enough knowledge.  Thanks, though.
Dave C.

Woke up this mornin' and I got myself a beer.
The future's uncertain and the end is alway near.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #13 on: May 04, 2018, 10:38:27 PM »
A friend from works makes his own invert and candi sugar, from his descriptions it's pretty simple. He makes it up in his brew kettle, then just runs his mash out on top of it.

I use Lyle's as well, but want to switch to making it myself in the near future.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline Robert

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Re: One brew that is a must.
« Reply #14 on: May 04, 2018, 11:28:05 PM »
It's simple, but involves several hours of standing and constantly stirring at the stove.  Simple doesn't necessarily mean easy.
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.