Author Topic: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study  (Read 4386 times)

Offline Big Monk

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #60 on: May 05, 2018, 11:15:49 PM »
If we keep agreeing on things Denny, we may cause a disturbance in the space-time continuum. 😂

Naw, I hope it hasn't come to the point where discussions are viewed as adversarial.

I hope you know that was just in jest. I think we align on a great many things. 😁
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #61 on: May 06, 2018, 12:36:55 AM »
I hate you both, if it helps

Offline Big Monk

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #62 on: May 06, 2018, 12:54:12 AM »
I hate you both, if it helps

Atta boy Jim!
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Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #63 on: May 06, 2018, 01:20:20 AM »

Offline Big Monk

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #64 on: May 06, 2018, 01:36:33 AM »


I’m starting to enjoy this place again. I hope it’s contagious.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #65 on: May 06, 2018, 01:38:49 AM »
This forum certainly moves in fits, starts, & spurts.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #66 on: May 06, 2018, 02:09:22 PM »
I've been watching this thread from afar with interest, but I'm just now able to post. My apologies if this is a bit disjointed.

A) In my experience, I can buy that BRY-97 ≈ WLP051 and WY1056 ≈ US-05 (I don't have enough experience with 1272 or 001 to include my opinion here), but I can't see all 4 being the same. Their performance in hoppy beers is just too different for me (97 and 051 seem to scalp some hop flavor where 1056 and US-05 don't).

B) Regarding the real world application of this data, while the genetics in no way supercedes what we know through years of empiric practice, I'm always looking for new ideas to try out. For example, in my case I've been brewing a lot of lagers with dry yeast lately. 34/70 is great for accelerated fermentations, but doesn't produce any sulfur (which I enjoy a hint of). S-189 produces the right amount of sulfur for me, but throws fusels when I ramp the temps too high or fast. If BRY-97 is potentially a Pastorianus strain, then this could be a new option for me. It's certainly worth a try, and the seed of the idea has come from this piece of information from the genetics.
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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #67 on: May 06, 2018, 02:33:14 PM »
Couple things.  One, erockrph says dry "34/70" doesn't produce sulphur.  But wet versions (2124 and 830) most certainly do.  Which goes to the issue of changes in performance in dry versions, and I wonder if other differences in the way yeast is handled and grown less extreme than dry yeast production (just the SOPs of different labs)  might similarly lead to changes in performance of two (originally) identical strains.

And my curiosity has got the better of me.  Put the dregs of a few SNPAs in 250mL of starter wort on the stir plate last night.  Will step it up in the coming days and see what it looks like.  Then decide if I will try a lager fermentation with it.  Won't know for sure which commercial strain (if any) is "equivalent," but I am curious as to whether it might be pastorianus in SNPA. Or maybe who cares if it's pastorianus, just will it make a "lager?"
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Offline denny

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #68 on: May 06, 2018, 03:53:40 PM »
I hate you both, if it helps

doesn't hurt...;)
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Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #69 on: May 06, 2018, 04:10:21 PM »
The study had commercial yeasts, but those were coded. There are people who say they have cracked the codes. After looking this over, I wonder how accurate the code cracking was.

The White Labs .pdf is here.
https://www.whitelabs.com/sites/default/files/White%20Labs%202018%20Web%20Catalog.pdf
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #70 on: May 06, 2018, 09:13:03 PM »
The study had commercial yeasts, but those were coded. There are people who say they have cracked the codes. After looking this over, I wonder how accurate the code cracking was.

The White Labs .pdf is here.
https://www.whitelabs.com/sites/default/files/White%20Labs%202018%20Web%20Catalog.pdf

Exactly.  By comparison I agree their guesses appear mostly accurate.  Mostly.
Dave

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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #71 on: May 07, 2018, 11:38:35 AM »
Smarter people, help me.  I notice that the Cell study notes with interest that 10 of the cerevisiae strains in the study are used commercially to make lager, which had been thought to be accomplished only with the related pastorianus.  Indications are that all of the strains on the tree are in fact cerevisiae.  So does this mean that WLP051 either a) has not in fact been identified as pastorianus or b) does not in fact appear on the tree?
Rob Stein
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #72 on: May 07, 2018, 11:52:06 AM »
Smarter people, help me.  I notice that the Cell study notes with interest that 10 of the cerevisiae strains in the study are used commercially to make lager, which had been thought to be accomplished only with the related pastorianus.  Indications are that all of the strains on the tree are in fact cerevisiae.  So does this mean that WLP051 either a) has not in fact been identified as pastorianus or b) does not in fact appear on the tree?

Excellent question!  This is so confusing to me too -- I thought only ales were on the charts, but the experts continue to insist that WLP051 was among those tested and they made 3 slots of where it might be.  So now I don't know what to think.
Dave

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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #73 on: May 11, 2018, 11:57:54 AM »
Well, building up whatever's in a bottle of SNPA, as I posted above.  It is clearly a top fermenting yeast (crappy pic):
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TdiBFYtdSdx7C269ES3VdC3baDFEzaF1/view?usp=drivesdk
But that said, it actually smells less estery at this point than a starter of 2124 would.  So.  Whatever this tells.
Rob Stein
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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #74 on: May 17, 2018, 10:34:49 PM »
Well, building up whatever's in a bottle of SNPA, as I posted above.  It is clearly a top fermenting yeast (crappy pic):
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TdiBFYtdSdx7C269ES3VdC3baDFEzaF1/view?usp=drivesdk
But that said, it actually smells less estery at this point than a starter of 2124 would.  So.  Whatever this tells.
Don't feel confident I have quite enough for a lager pitch after my last step-up -- so tomorrow's pre-Prohibition lager just got redesignated a pre-Prohibition "sparkling ale."  Then I'll have plenty, and next time hope to do a "lager" fermentation, and see if it seems plausible this yeast once made "lagers" at Ballantine.  Will follow up at that time.  (See, now I feel like putting "lager" and "ale" in quotes from now on...)
Rob Stein
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