Author Topic: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study  (Read 2739 times)

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #75 on: May 17, 2018, 11:19:28 PM »
Well, building up whatever's in a bottle of SNPA, as I posted above.  It is clearly a top fermenting yeast (crappy pic):
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TdiBFYtdSdx7C269ES3VdC3baDFEzaF1/view?usp=drivesdk
But that said, it actually smells less estery at this point than a starter of 2124 would.  So.  Whatever this tells.
Don't feel confident I have quite enough for a lager pitch after my last step-up -- so tomorrow's pre-Prohibition lager just got redesignated a pre-Prohibition "sparkling ale."  Then I'll have plenty, and next time hope to do a "lager" fermentation, and see if it seems plausible this yeast once made "lagers" at Ballantine.  Will follow up at that time.  (See, now I feel like putting "lager" and "ale" in quotes from now on...)
Up until recently, in Texas, "ale" meant over 5% ABV. So ale... lager... IPA... these are all meaningless terms

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #76 on: May 18, 2018, 11:35:14 AM »
Even “hybrid” can now have different meanings - a Kölsch style hybrid ale using lager yeast? Or a Kölsch style ale using hybrid yeast? It depends on the yeast...but then the yeast itself has to be genotyped for “certainty”?
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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #77 on: May 20, 2018, 11:01:52 PM »
Well, building up whatever's in a bottle of SNPA, as I posted above.  It is clearly a top fermenting yeast (crappy pic):
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TdiBFYtdSdx7C269ES3VdC3baDFEzaF1/view?usp=drivesdk
But that said, it actually smells less estery at this point than a starter of 2124 would.  So.  Whatever this tells.
Don't feel confident I have quite enough for a lager pitch after my last step-up -- so tomorrow's pre-Prohibition lager just got redesignated a pre-Prohibition "sparkling ale."  Then I'll have plenty, and next time hope to do a "lager" fermentation, and see if it seems plausible this yeast once made "lagers" at Ballantine.  Will follow up at that time.  (See, now I feel like putting "lager" and "ale" in quotes from now on...)

Well something strange.  After just 36 hours the yeast had quit and flocced out, at only 36%AA.  Never seen anything like this in all my years of brewing.  What's more, the beer was completely insipid -- no hop or malt aroma or flavor, just a little bready yeastiness, no apparent foam capacity -- weird.  Suspect either the yeast in the bottle isn't the yeast in the ferment (though it may have been years ago) or it's just not adapted to my fermentation conditions (needs open fermentation?) Or something I haven't thought of, I'm stumped. Anyway, it was a fun idea, but it's a dumper, as I'll have time to brew again this week.

(Think I'll buy some 1056 though...)
« Last Edit: May 20, 2018, 11:23:57 PM by Robert »
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Offline denny

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #78 on: May 21, 2018, 03:47:28 PM »
Well, building up whatever's in a bottle of SNPA, as I posted above.  It is clearly a top fermenting yeast (crappy pic):
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1TdiBFYtdSdx7C269ES3VdC3baDFEzaF1/view?usp=drivesdk
But that said, it actually smells less estery at this point than a starter of 2124 would.  So.  Whatever this tells.
Don't feel confident I have quite enough for a lager pitch after my last step-up -- so tomorrow's pre-Prohibition lager just got redesignated a pre-Prohibition "sparkling ale."  Then I'll have plenty, and next time hope to do a "lager" fermentation, and see if it seems plausible this yeast once made "lagers" at Ballantine.  Will follow up at that time.  (See, now I feel like putting "lager" and "ale" in quotes from now on...)

Well something strange.  After just 36 hours the yeast had quit and flocced out, at only 36%AA.  Never seen anything like this in all my years of brewing.  What's more, the beer was completely insipid -- no hop or malt aroma or flavor, just a little bready yeastiness, no apparent foam capacity -- weird.  Suspect either the yeast in the bottle isn't the yeast in the ferment (though it may have been years ago) or it's just not adapted to my fermentation conditions (needs open fermentation?) Or something I haven't thought of, I'm stumped. Anyway, it was a fun idea, but it's a dumper, as I'll have time to brew again this week.

(Think I'll buy some 1056 though...)

I guarantee you that the yeast in the bottle is the same yeast they ferment with.
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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #79 on: May 21, 2018, 06:00:37 PM »
^^^^^
I'll buy that.  Probably was too big an ask for it to adapt to totally different conditions right out of the gate. It was off like a rocket, then flocced, and I had no means of rousing it.  Anyway, I picked up a pitch of 051, which I wouldn't have been inspired to do either if not for this topic.   :)

EDIT At least I've seen that SNPA yeast is emphatically top fermenting and top cropping --  it ain't a lager yeast. FWIW.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2018, 07:31:42 PM by Robert »
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Online dmtaylor

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #80 on: May 22, 2018, 02:08:33 AM »
As I'd indicated previously (and copied below), based on my reviews of the genome study results, I didn't think 1056 and WLP051 could be equivalent.  I wasn't sure if 1056 might be a lager yeast, while WLP051 probably IS a lager yeast.

EDIT: And... forgot to mention... I *do* believe Sierra Nevada is 1056.  WLP051 on the other hand is supposedly Anchor Liberty.  Source: http://www.mrmalty.com/yeast.htm

...to be clear, WLP051 and Wyeast 1056 are NOT equivalent.  They are very very distant cousins.

BRY-96 = Wyeast 1056, AND NOTHING ELSE!  NOTHING else is exactly equivalent!  1056 is unique!

BRY-97 = WLP051 = 1272, AND NOTHING ELSE!  Nothing else is exactly equivalent!  And if I'm right in my interpretation as explained above, then all 3 of these might be pastorianus...

...the pastorianus *might* indeed be limited to just BRY-97 = WLP051 = 1272...

EDIT #2: Hell... now expert "qq" says he doesn't think 1272 is actually the same as WLP051, but rather is more closely related to WLP002 and WLP007... and "German" ale yeast WLP029!  He found a different study separating 1272 from WLP051.  To be clear: Of all these, WLP051 is the only one identified verily as pastorianus.  http://beer.suregork.com/?p=4000

Hmm.... gonna be a while longer before we get all this stuff straight.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 02:31:35 AM by dmtaylor »
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Offline Robert

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #81 on: May 22, 2018, 02:49:48 AM »
Well, my 051 starter is behaving just like I'd expect of my usual 2124 starters.  As sure as I am that the SNPA (bottle) yeast (by any other name) is an "ale" yeast, I, inveterate lager brewer, am gonna bet 051 is a "lager" yeast.  Whatever that means.  It's like asking a prospective employee for their family's work history instead of assessing their own skills.
« Last Edit: May 22, 2018, 02:51:23 AM by Robert »
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