Author Topic: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort  (Read 427 times)

Offline tbone10

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Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« on: May 18, 2018, 10:44:06 PM »
Hello to all, first time posting here.

Essentially, our glass carboy cracked from the neck down until about half way, while pouring the wort. 
A few minutes later the neck came off on a clean break, shortly after we had transferred it into another carboy.

My question is whether, in your opinion, it is still safe to proceed with the fermentation process and there likely isn't any glass shards and glass dust in the beer or should we just forget it and get rid of it?

Thanks for your input.

Offline Stevie

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2018, 10:50:36 PM »
Was the wort hot?

Any glass will likely sink, but it could easily bust open shortly.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2018, 11:31:29 PM »
Be glad you didn't get cut.  Consider the various options of HDPE and stainless.

I think that any glass in your beer will settle out after fermentation.  Siphon from the top and leave some behind.

If you're concerned, dump it.  Ain't no shame in dumping.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline Bo Buck Brewery

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2018, 11:37:02 PM »
I would try to salvage my beer by any means necessary.  Let it finish fermenting. 

Offline tbone10

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2018, 01:41:02 AM »
The wort was hot indeed. We managed to transfer it from the cracked carboy to another one. So we're not using it anymore.

My main concern is mostl where the crack is if glass dust could be found in the wort and if so would the beer still be ok to drink.

Thank you for answers guys. Much appreciated.

Offline Phil_M

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2018, 01:48:51 AM »

My main concern is mostl where the crack is if glass dust could be found in the wort and if so would the beer still be ok to drink.


Yes, it could, and no, it wouldn't. If it was me I'd play it safe and toss the batch.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.

Offline majorvices

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2018, 12:52:13 PM »
Be very, very careful when using glass carboys. You should NEVER put hot wort in carboys. And if one cracks picking it up full can be very hazardous. I've been around the homebrewing community for over 20 years and I can't even begin to count the number of horror stories of emergency room (lacerations) visits that have come from people handling carboys. I once slipped and fell into a carboy that broke and had a nasty gash on my thigh that could have been serious had it been closer to an artery.

Offline Joe Sr.

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #7 on: May 19, 2018, 01:50:50 PM »

My main concern is mostl where the crack is if glass dust could be found in the wort and if so would the beer still be ok to drink.


Yes, it could, and no, it wouldn't. If it was me I'd play it safe and toss the batch.

I don't disagree on playing it safe, but shouldn't the solids settle out?  It's not like he's going to drink the beer immediately with glass in it.  It's going to ferment, settle, be transferred, etc.  I think the risk from the glass is low.  But we all need to determine our own risk tolerance.
It's all in the reflexes. - Jack Burton

Offline majorvices

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #8 on: May 19, 2018, 02:32:25 PM »
Agree - glass doesn't float. It should be fine

Offline mainebrewer

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2018, 09:49:08 PM »
The wort was hot indeed. We managed to transfer it from the cracked carboy to another one. So we're not using it anymore.

My main concern is mostl where the crack is if glass dust could be found in the wort and if so would the beer still be ok to drink.

Thank you for answers guys. Much appreciated.


I gotta ask, just how hot was the wort when you poured it into the carboy and why were you pouring hot wort into a carboy?
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Offline Phil_M

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Re: Glass carboy cracked when pouring the wort
« Reply #10 on: May 20, 2018, 02:50:03 AM »

My main concern is mostl where the crack is if glass dust could be found in the wort and if so would the beer still be ok to drink.


Yes, it could, and no, it wouldn't. If it was me I'd play it safe and toss the batch.

I don't disagree on playing it safe, but shouldn't the solids settle out?  It's not like he's going to drink the beer immediately with glass in it.  It's going to ferment, settle, be transferred, etc.  I think the risk from the glass is low.  But we all need to determine our own risk tolerance.

I'd agree it's low, I likely draw the line earlier than some would. But a batch of beer is cheap, and with my benefits an ER visit isn't.

I've been phasing out my glass. I'll agree it's superior to plastic in many respects, but stainless will beat both.
Corn is a fine adjunct in beer.

And don't buy stale beer.