Author Topic: Brut IPA  (Read 1029 times)

Offline erockrph

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Brut IPA
« on: May 25, 2018, 06:55:56 PM »
I've been catching up on some of the blogs I keep tabs on, and I've come across a series of articles on Brut IPA over at Beer and Wine Journal (here's a link to the first post in the series). I have to admit A) I've never heard of this style before and B) I was intrigued. (That combo is rare when I typically read about a "new beer style")

Has anyone tried a commercial version of the style? Are they dry and bitter, or crisp and fruity? I'm certainly interested in trying my hand at something in this style, has anyone else brewed one?

Here's a stab at a recipe off the top of my head

80% Base malt
20% D-45 Candi Syrup

1.055 OG
~50 IBU at 60 min (from Hopshot, Magnum, etc.)
1 oz/gal flameout (Simcoe/Citra)
2 oz/ gal dry hop (Simcoe/Citra)

Big pitch of WY3787 or WY1214, second dose of O2 after ~12 hours, ferment low 60's

Carbonate to ~4 volumes
Eric B.

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Offline denny

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2018, 07:20:52 PM »
From what I read, using amylase enzyme is a big part of it.  I think maybe Drew made one recently.  And FWIW, that recipe is nothing like an IPA.
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Offline narcout

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2018, 08:25:06 PM »
I haven't brewed one, but there was some good info on Episode 65 of the EB podcast.

https://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast/episode-65-travels-paula
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Offline Wilbur

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2018, 09:29:14 PM »
From what I read, using amylase enzyme is a big part of it.  I think maybe Drew made one recently.  And FWIW, that recipe is nothing like an IPA.



Ahh...one of the greatest shows in our life time. What's not IPA like about it? I haven't seen a lot of sugar in standard IPA recipes, but its pretty common in double IPA recipes. Or are you arguing about the style?

Looking at some of the articles, they describe it as basically no bitterness or malt character:
Quote from: Sturdavant
https://www.sfgate.com/beer/article/How-Brut-IPA-became-San-Francisco-s-newest-beer-12771517.php#photo-15266980
“I had it in my head: What would happen if I used this (enzyme) with a smaller beer, like an IPA, to make a basically sparkling hop beverage with no sweetness in it?”

I'd drop out the bittering hops completely, use some Amyloglucosidase enzyme, do a long mash at 145 and a short boil, dry hop and flameout only. Seems interesting for a small batch to test, but I'd be worried about it coming off as astringent or too dry.

Here's the article mentioned on Beer and Wine Journal, Chris Colby has some thoughts (even if he hasn't brewed one).
Amyloglucosidase

Offline Robert

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2018, 10:00:34 PM »
It's my understanding that the "original" IPAs,  after a year or more of ageing at extreme temperatures at the brewery, semi-intentional Brett inoculation in the shipping cask en route to the bottler abroad, and a year or so in the bottle, finally reached the consumer with a SG in the range of 0.090, brilliant clarity, considerable carbonation, virtually no malt character or bitterness -- just sort of sparkling water with some hop flavor and aroma,  a little funk, and quite a kick.  This interesting idea might give the most IPA-like IPA around (depending on what we mean by IPA anymore.)  I wouldn't brew one, but I'd sure like to try one.
EDIT yeah I meant FG of 0.900 but you knew that....
« Last Edit: May 26, 2018, 03:20:13 AM by Robert »
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #5 on: May 26, 2018, 03:14:06 AM »
It's my understanding that the "original" IPAs,  after a year or more of ageing at extreme temperatures at the brewery, semi-intentional Brett inoculation in the shipping cask en route to the bottler abroad, and a year or so in the bottle, finally reached the consumer with a SG in the range of 0.090, brilliant clarity, considerable carbonation, virtually no malt character or bitterness -- just sort of sparkling water with some hop flavor and aroma,  a little funk, and quite a kick.  This interesting idea might give the most IPA-like IPA around (depending on what we mean by IPA anymore.)  I wouldn't brew one, but I'd sure like to try one.
Funny, when I was first reading the article I was thinking that the style reminded me of a Brett IPA, minus the Brett character.

I wonder if my 162/145 iterated mash schedule would get close enough without using exogenous enzymes.

And I can appreciate that the style may not seem like an IPA if you're going by the traditional IPA definition. I've started to accept that it has become common parlance to refer to any highly hopped beer as "____ IPA", even if the amount of hops used is the only thing it has in common with an IPA.

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Offline Robert

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #6 on: May 26, 2018, 03:32:22 AM »
It's my understanding that the "original" IPAs,  after a year or more of ageing at extreme temperatures at the brewery, semi-intentional Brett inoculation in the shipping cask en route to the bottler abroad, and a year or so in the bottle, finally reached the consumer with a SG in the range of 0.090, brilliant clarity, considerable carbonation, virtually no malt character or bitterness -- just sort of sparkling water with some hop flavor and aroma,  a little funk, and quite a kick.  This interesting idea might give the most IPA-like IPA around (depending on what we mean by IPA anymore.)  I wouldn't brew one, but I'd sure like to try one.
Funny, when I was first reading the article I was thinking that the style reminded me of a Brett IPA, minus the Brett character.

I wonder if my 162/145 iterated mash schedule would get close enough without using exogenous enzymes.

And I can appreciate that the style may not seem like an IPA if you're going by the traditional IPA definition. I've started to accept that it has become common parlance to refer to any highly hopped beer as "____ IPA", even if the amount of hops used is the only thing it has in common with an IPA.

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What's "traditional?" In the last 10, 100, or how many years? 

It also occurs to me that the popularity of IPA in its original iteration depended on its refreshing quality.  This may have been almost accidental.  Had the original brewers been able to produce a beer with the same crisp, dry quality without the Brett, mightn't they have jumped at the chance?  Dry it out any way you can, see what you get.  But how you get to FG below 1.000 is going to be challenging.
Rob
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Offline denny

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #7 on: May 26, 2018, 03:51:40 PM »
From what I read, using amylase enzyme is a big part of it.  I think maybe Drew made one recently.  And FWIW, that recipe is nothing like an IPA.



Ahh...one of the greatest shows in our life time. What's not IPA like about it? I haven't seen a lot of sugar in standard IPA recipes, but its pretty common in double IPA recipes. Or are you arguing about the style?

Looking at some of the articles, they describe it as basically no bitterness or malt character:
Quote from: Sturdavant
https://www.sfgate.com/beer/article/How-Brut-IPA-became-San-Francisco-s-newest-beer-12771517.php#photo-15266980
“I had it in my head: What would happen if I used this (enzyme) with a smaller beer, like an IPA, to make a basically sparkling hop beverage with no sweetness in it?”

I'd drop out the bittering hops completely, use some Amyloglucosidase enzyme, do a long mash at 145 and a short boil, dry hop and flameout only. Seems interesting for a small batch to test, but I'd be worried about it coming off as astringent or too dry.

Here's the article mentioned on Beer and Wine Journal, Chris Colby has some thoughts (even if he hasn't brewed one).
Amyloglucosidase

It it was table sugar or even light candi syrup, no problem.  But D45 and Belgian yeast takes it out of IPA style IMO.
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Offline erockrph

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #8 on: May 30, 2018, 07:51:02 PM »
D45 makes for a passable substitute for light Crystal malt while having the fermentability of simple sugar. It doesn't necessarily push a beer into Belgian territory on it's own.

I did mean to say 1469 rather than 1214 in my original post. With a big pitch and a lot of oxygen you can end up with a dry beer and a relatively clean ester profile.

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Offline chumley

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2018, 12:20:52 PM »
Brut IPA sounds like a good style for those who enjoy artisan dwarf cabbages...

[

Offline Wilbur

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2018, 09:40:38 PM »
Brut IPA sounds like a good style for those who enjoy artisan dwarf cabbages...

[
Amazing.

I'm drinking a brut IPA from bearded owl brewing in Peoria. It's the heaviest light beer I've had... Malt character is non-existent. Not sure if it's quite as carbonated per "style". Hop aroma is there, but not as big as I'd think. It tastes like a less astringent hop tea. It's definitely easy enough to drink, but not sure if you want to.

Offline Wilbur

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2018, 09:51:28 PM »
Update: It's gone (13 oz pour). Color was straw gold with a tinge of green. Feeling it a bit already.

Offline klickitat jim

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2018, 11:07:46 PM »
Anyone have a good recipe for a Brut IPA with artisan dwarf cabbages?

Offline Wilbur

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2018, 11:14:32 PM »
Anyone have a good recipe for a Brut IPA with artisan dwarf cabbages?
Where would you enter that? Vegetable beer? Experimental Beer? Speciality IPA?

Offline chumley

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Re: Brut IPA
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2018, 12:59:01 AM »
Anyone have a good recipe for a Brut IPA with artisan dwarf cabbages?
Where would you enter that? Vegetable beer? Experimental Beer? Speciality IPA?

I would think that would be a very good question to ask Ron Pattinson, being that he is a huge proponent of the BJCP style guide....