Author Topic: Converted Keg Question  (Read 480 times)

Offline ajjensen147

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Converted Keg Question
« on: May 31, 2018, 04:05:33 PM »
Hello all,

In the process of finishing up my keg conversion for a new brew kettle. I used an angle grinder to cut the top off, and it worked well, if a little rough, since I did ended up doing it free hand.  I cleaned the edge up a bit with the grinder and a file to take away any sharp edges.  However, I'm considering using this kettle to do BIAB, and I'm concerned that even though the edges don't seem sharp to the touch, they will wear on/cut the bag over time. I'm looking at possibly putting some kind of edge trim around the lip to protect the bag (and myself if the edges are still a little sharp in areas) and was wondering if anyone has done anything similar or has any suggestions?

Thanks,
A.J.

Offline Steve L

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2018, 04:48:36 PM »
Hello all,

In the process of finishing up my keg conversion for a new brew kettle. I used an angle grinder to cut the top off, and it worked well, if a little rough, since I did ended up doing it free hand.  I cleaned the edge up a bit with the grinder and a file to take away any sharp edges.  However, I'm considering using this kettle to do BIAB, and I'm concerned that even though the edges don't seem sharp to the touch, they will wear on/cut the bag over time. I'm looking at possibly putting some kind of edge trim around the lip to protect the bag (and myself if the edges are still a little sharp in areas) and was wondering if anyone has done anything similar or has any suggestions?

Thanks,
A.J.
You could always just get a length of high temp transfer hose and cut a slit in one side, lengthwise. Should slip right over the rough edge. Then get some of the red high temp food grade silicone sealant to keep it in place. Or for that matter, you could just run a bead of the same sealant to cover the edge. Smoker.BBQ sealant is rated up to like 500F.  Something like that maybe :)

Corripe Cervisiam

Offline Stevie

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2018, 05:25:11 PM »
I would do the above. Purpose made silicone edging is expensive.

Offline Slowbrew

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2018, 07:33:19 PM »
I'd spend more time grinding the edge to get it smooth.  You can use different gauge wheels to knock off the edges (Course), then flatten and smooth (medium) and finally polish (Fine).

It takes more time but I think you would be happier in the long run.

Paul
Where the heck are we going?  And what's with this hand basket?

Offline jeffy

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2018, 07:36:07 PM »
I'd spend more time grinding the edge to get it smooth.  You can use different gauge wheels to knock off the edges (Course), then flatten and smooth (medium) and finally polish (Fine).

It takes more time but I think you would be happier in the long run.

Paul
I second this.  I finished mine using a die grinder and a sanding stone attachment, but you can use rough sandpaper by hand and get it pretty smooth.
By the way, I hope you came by this keg honestly.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
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Offline denny

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2018, 07:48:50 PM »
I'd spend more time grinding the edge to get it smooth.  You can use different gauge wheels to knock off the edges (Course), then flatten and smooth (medium) and finally polish (Fine).

It takes more time but I think you would be happier in the long run.

Paul
I second this.  I finished mine using a die grinder and a sanding stone attachment, but you can use rough sandpaper by hand and get it pretty smooth.
By the way, I hope you came by this keg honestly.

Yep.  I hand sanded with sandpaper and it came out great.
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Offline ajjensen147

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2018, 08:20:21 PM »
Thanks for all the quick feedback, everyone! Really appreciate it.


By the way, I hope you came by this keg honestly.

Lol, yes. My buddy works for a local brewery and it was one of their damaged kegs they were no longer using.

Offline Kevin

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2018, 05:42:51 PM »
“He was a wise man who invented beer.”
- Plato

Offline James K

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Re: Converted Keg Question
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2018, 08:34:31 PM »
Your local hardware shop should sell emery cloth sandpaper that is specific to sanding metal surfaces.

This is what I used and the rim of my kettle is nice and smooth. I ended up using 2 of the 3 sheets that came in the package.

I also used the sand paper when I drilled my holes for the thermometer and ball valve that are on the kettle.
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