Author Topic: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe  (Read 236 times)

Offline soymateofeo

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« on: June 14, 2018, 08:51:07 PM »
Damn frustrated.

I put a new 5 lb co2 tank on my stout to carbonate it. I sprayed it all over with soapy water to check for leaks I saw nothing. I put all of it into the fridge and went out to pour off it ... oooohhh.... maybe 2 weeks later and my co2 tank was empty. My regulator is about 10 years old and the high pressure gauge is broken up pretty bad at this point. SO, I bought a new taprite regulator on their. I put a 10lb co2 tank on there (because I had one) and reassembled the setup. I then checked for co2 leakage. Nothing.  So here are my questions.
1. can my regulator leak out the gauge? 
1.5  I swear I didn't see anything but can old regulators just leak somewhere?  I checked all the hoses? 
2. I have a 4 way manifold on there from about 10 years ago.  Should that get cleaned out with pbw or something ever?  I have check valves on it. 

Thanks team, this is very frustrating and I hate releasing co2 without drinking while I'm doing it.

Offline jeffy

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3392
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2018, 09:12:58 PM »
You could try carbonating a keg, then turning off the gas at the tank and disconnecting it from the keg.  If your beer doesn't pour the next day, the leak is at the keg.
A long time ago I saw somebody took a section of an old inner tube and fit it over the top of a keg so he could fill it with water and look for bubbles.  I thought that was pretty cool, but usually spraying with star san works well.
Yes, regulators can leak.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline soymateofeo

  • 1st Kit
  • *
  • Posts: 15
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2018, 09:52:17 PM »
You could try carbonating a keg, then turning off the gas at the tank and disconnecting it from the keg.  If your beer doesn't pour the next day, the leak is at the keg.
A long time ago I saw somebody took a section of an old inner tube and fit it over the top of a keg so he could fill it with water and look for bubbles.  I thought that was pretty cool, but usually spraying with star san works well.
Yes, regulators can leak.

great ideas!  i don't understand tge innertube idea. it sounds nifty.

Offline jeffy

  • Official Poobah of No Life.
  • *
  • Posts: 3392
  • Tampa, Fl
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #3 on: June 15, 2018, 12:50:48 AM »
You could try carbonating a keg, then turning off the gas at the tank and disconnecting it from the keg.  If your beer doesn't pour the next day, the leak is at the keg.
A long time ago I saw somebody took a section of an old inner tube and fit it over the top of a keg so he could fill it with water and look for bubbles.  I thought that was pretty cool, but usually spraying with star san works well.
Yes, regulators can leak.

great ideas!  i don't understand tge innertube idea. it sounds nifty.
He cut a cross section of 6 or 7 inch wide inner tube and stretched it over the top of the keg, making a water tight bowl above the posts of the keg into which he could pour water, so that the top of the keg was under water.
Jeff Gladish, Tampa (989.3, 175.1 Apparent Rennarian)
Homebrewing since 1990
AHA member since 1991, now a lifetime member
BJCP judge since 1995

Offline Wilbur

  • Brewer
  • ****
  • Posts: 348
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #4 on: June 15, 2018, 04:57:27 AM »
You could try carbonating a keg, then turning off the gas at the tank and disconnecting it from the keg.  If your beer doesn't pour the next day, the leak is at the keg.
A long time ago I saw somebody took a section of an old inner tube and fit it over the top of a keg so he could fill it with water and look for bubbles.  I thought that was pretty cool, but usually spraying with star san works well.
Yes, regulators can leak.

great ideas!  i don't understand tge innertube idea. it sounds nifty.
He cut a cross section of 6 or 7 inch wide inner tube and stretched it over the top of the keg, making a water tight bowl above the posts of the keg into which he could pour water, so that the top of the keg was under water.

Maybe you could try saran wrap? Not sure if you could stretch it tight enough to get a seal.

Offline kramerog

  • Senior Brewmaster
  • ******
  • Posts: 1810
    • View Profile
    • My LinkedIn page
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #5 on: June 15, 2018, 01:32:06 PM »
You could try carbonating a keg, then turning off the gas at the tank and disconnecting it from the keg.  If your beer doesn't pour the next day, the leak is at the keg.
A long time ago I saw somebody took a section of an old inner tube and fit it over the top of a keg so he could fill it with water and look for bubbles.  I thought that was pretty cool, but usually spraying with star san works well.
Yes, regulators can leak.

great ideas!  i don't understand tge innertube idea. it sounds nifty.
He cut a cross section of 6 or 7 inch wide inner tube and stretched it over the top of the keg, making a water tight bowl above the posts of the keg into which he could pour water, so that the top of the keg was under water.
Ingenious!

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8845
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2018, 03:15:06 PM »
If the keg is empty you can fill a bucket or a big sink, put 30 PSI into the keg, and put the top part of the keg into the water. I have also put my manifolds into a bucket water to find leaks. Learned this ages ago when my farmer uncles would check for leaks on the smaller tires on the farm (not rear tractor tires of course).

Higher pressure on the keg or lines will help you find slow leaks.

I have had leaks in the regulator assembly and at the regulator to tank connections. I used Star San to find those.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Bob357

  • Assistant Brewer
  • ***
  • Posts: 227
  • I can't hang with Denny. My day ends at 1.060.
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2018, 05:19:42 PM »
If your manifold has the valves with stamped red handles the valves are suspect. They tend to leak when the valve is in the open position. I've had sever instances of this. Fill a bucket or sink and submerge the manifold/hose assembly and turn the valves on and off to test for this. Pressure in the normal range works best.

If you don't find any other leaks suspect the gas in post O ring. It's the hardest leak to find. Probably best to just replace it and lube with keg lube or other food grade lubricant.
Beer is my bucket list,

Bob357
Fallon, NV

Offline hopfenundmalz

  • Global Moderator
  • I must live here
  • *****
  • Posts: 8845
  • Milford, MI
    • View Profile
Re: CO2 manifolds, old regulator and my liufe
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2018, 05:31:43 PM »
I had a valve with a red handle that was a leaker when submerged, at the threaded base. It broke when I tightened it, revealing porosity in the brass. Had to replace it, then no leaks with the new valve.
Jeff Rankert
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild
AHA Governing Committee
BJCP National
Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!