Author Topic: Biere de Garde recipe critique  (Read 892 times)

Offline Brewtopalonian

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Re: Biere de Garde recipe critique
« Reply #30 on: September 24, 2018, 03:23:50 AM »
I guess we got a bit off topic.  I'm just wondering why I've never ever had a head problem, even when using a protein rest.

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What is your typical mash schedule?
It really depends on what I'm making but I guess mostly a single infusion no mashout sparge.  If I'm making my Weissen it's a triple decoction mash. 112°, 122°, 149°

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Offline denny

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Re: Biere de Garde recipe critique
« Reply #31 on: September 24, 2018, 02:27:58 PM »
Wow, you guys are turning everything I thought I knew about brewing on it's head.  Should I throw out my books and what I've learned in them?  At 170° aren't you worried about astringency?  For no sparge do you just put your total boil volume plus grain absorbtion into your MT?  Gentle boil ever give you issues with DMS?

Pardon my ignorance, it just seems like these things go against everything I've read.

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Offline Brewtopalonian

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Re: Biere de Garde recipe critique
« Reply #32 on: October 03, 2018, 04:50:24 PM »
Okay so what should I read/study to stay up to date and well informed, so as to avoid being made a fool of when I give what I had thought is sound advice?

Online is the place to be.  Right here right now is a good place to start.  And homebrewtalk.com as well.  And maybe Brulosophy.com.  The best thing to do always, of course, is to run your own experiments, learn from your own experiences, and thus become educated on stuff yourself, since there is so very much that remains debatable and contentious everywhere you go.  The hobby as a whole continues to evolve on a daily basis, literally.  I'm learning new stuff all the time, otherwise I wouldn't be here.  Some might think that after 19 years and roughly 160 batches homebrewing, and being online for almost that whole time, and reading tons of books, that I'd know everything about everything.  False.  I don't.  And neither does anyone else.  But if you can keep up with the joneses online, you'll be better off than most.

Cheers.

Just a heads up, I took your advice and have been looking this information up.  I found a Brulosophy exBeeriment suggesting that a protein rest does not have a negative effect on your head retention even given highly modified grains.
http://brulosophy.com/2018/09/10/the-mash-protein-rest-vs-single-infusion-exbeeriment-results/
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Online Robert

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Re: Biere de Garde recipe critique
« Reply #33 on: October 03, 2018, 05:30:11 PM »
I see a couple of problems with this xBmt right off.  One, it's a wheat beer.  Special case, not a legitimate test subject.   Two, the summary of the effects of a protein rest is incomplete and inaccurate.   I'm not sure he understood how it works or what he should be testing.  In brief, a "protein rest" is not just one thing.  Between 113°-127°F, proteinase is favored, reducing body- and foam-positive proteins and polypeptides to peptides and amino acids, necessary for yeast nutrition in worts made with large amounts of unmalted adjuncts.  Between 130°-140°F peptidase is favored, reducing proteins to polypeptides, which are crucial to body and foam. But even this rest can be detrimental with a malt that has already had the proteins adequately modified in malting, because the polypeptides will ultimately be reduced to aminos anyway.  So a proper experiment might use the Rahr two-row he used, but without the wheat.  It might compare 3 different temperature programs.   And science and experience say the result would be rather different.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Biere de Garde recipe critique
« Reply #34 on: October 03, 2018, 05:32:09 PM »
Okay so what should I read/study to stay up to date and well informed, so as to avoid being made a fool of when I give what I had thought is sound advice?

Online is the place to be.  Right here right now is a good place to start.  And homebrewtalk.com as well.  And maybe Brulosophy.com.  The best thing to do always, of course, is to run your own experiments, learn from your own experiences, and thus become educated on stuff yourself, since there is so very much that remains debatable and contentious everywhere you go.  The hobby as a whole continues to evolve on a daily basis, literally.  I'm learning new stuff all the time, otherwise I wouldn't be here.  Some might think that after 19 years and roughly 160 batches homebrewing, and being online for almost that whole time, and reading tons of books, that I'd know everything about everything.  False.  I don't.  And neither does anyone else.  But if you can keep up with the joneses online, you'll be better off than most.

Cheers.

Just a heads up, I took your advice and have been looking this information up.  I found a Brulosophy exBeeriment suggesting that a protein rest does not have a negative effect on your head retention even given highly modified grains.
http://brulosophy.com/2018/09/10/the-mash-protein-rest-vs-single-infusion-exbeeriment-results/

Brulosophy's experience is not consistent with my own.  But it's data!  And in their case, it's presented in a nice clean way for all to see.  However those guys will admit they're not the end-all be-all either, and neither am I, of course.  All good stuff to consider anyway.

Cheers.
Dave

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