Author Topic: How much oxygen should I add to my wort?  (Read 942 times)

Offline HopDen

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Re: How much oxygen should I add to my wort?
« Reply #15 on: August 13, 2018, 08:36:29 PM »
I stole grandma's oxygen tank, she doesn't need it anymore. 60 second blast, pitch the yeast.

Thanks Granny!

Offline Robert

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Re: How much oxygen should I add to my wort?
« Reply #16 on: August 13, 2018, 08:55:50 PM »
I've stopped aerating my wort in favor of aerating my yeast. While I'm chilling I dump my slurry into a jug along with a little wort and shake for about a minute until it's all foam, let it stand for 30 min then pitch into fermenter. I have activity within an hour.
I've been thinking about going this route when repitching.  I already do it to some extent shaking and swirling the yeast pack up into the liquid in the jar.  My thought is then to do as you say, put my measured amount of slurry in a jug with some wort and "shake it like it owes me money"  and let it settle.  Makes more and more sense as I look into it.  The result should be yeast in a condition analogous to dry yeast (that is, not requiring well-aerated wort,) which is becoming my preference for a first generation pitch.  Over-aeration of wort has the potential to do way more harm than good, it seems.  Somebody please correct me if I'm misguided.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2018, 09:48:44 PM by Robert »
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Offline lupulus

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Re: How much oxygen should I add to my wort?
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2018, 10:19:12 PM »
Use a Speidel fermenter with caps so you can put it sideways.
Have 2/3 wort and 1/3 air.
Rock it sideways for 3 min.
If the temperature of the wort is constant, you will introduce a constant amount of oxygen in the wort that won't over oxygenate.
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