Author Topic: My Professional Basement Brewery  (Read 9308 times)

Offline Richard

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #75 on: February 19, 2021, 09:42:40 PM »
I said it earlier and Ill say it again! THAT IS THE BADDEST BAD ASS HOME BREW SET UP I HAVE EVER LAID MY JEALOUS EYES ON! We all have our degree of obsession with our own hobbies and this guy is at the apex of homebrewing systems, ever!!

Good for you Sir!

See, I'd have to disagree with that.  I don't see bigger, more complex systems as necessarily better.  If others do,  no problem.
From what Bilsch says above, it's less about homebrew and more about science and experimentation.  it's fancier than even some of the most sophisticated breweries and pretty cool that he can afford the time and money for such a project.
I am retired now but before that when I wanted to do science and experimentation using fancy equipment I went to work. When I came home I wanted something different.
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Offline Bilsch

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #76 on: February 19, 2021, 09:52:01 PM »
There are at least 5 of these Stout Brucontrol based systems of varying level of installed data gathering sensors now in operation and people get really interesting ideas all the time on what to test. For example, in the past brewers have wondered and tried to calculate/guess, how long it takes for ferment CO2 to bring an empty keg down to zero oxygen. So someone with a system like this and the probes decided to actually test how long it took. He had O2 sensors in the keg and one in the outflow stream just to be sure the data was good. Now we know the actual answer, not just a guess. We also know how long it actually takes the yeast DO method to scavenge all the O2 in the strike water, what is the best dose of yeast and sugar and how do different temperatures effect that speed. Also how long the water will hold at zero DO. Another guy also has a nitrogen generator and set out to find out how long it takes to purge the grist to zero DO. We also found out how many purge/fill cycles is takes a beer gun type filler to bring a bottle down to zero DO. Currently there is a lot of work going on about getting the most out of grain enzymes and improving attenuation. These are just a few examples of the mounds of data that is amassing.

It used to be when you asked a question on a brewing forum about some process, the best answer you could get was, "I tried that but didn't notice any difference".
« Last Edit: February 19, 2021, 09:53:48 PM by Bilsch »

Offline BrewBama

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #77 on: February 19, 2021, 10:10:49 PM »
Y’all should write a book.
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Offline Richard

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #78 on: February 19, 2021, 11:26:02 PM »
...
It used to be when you asked a question on a brewing forum about some process, the best answer you could get was, "I tried that but didn't notice any difference".

That seems to be the standard Brulosophy conclusion. They try lots of things and few of their tasters appear to notice the difference.
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

Offline Megary

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #79 on: February 20, 2021, 12:12:34 AM »
Y’all should write a book.

LODO for Dummies would be right up my alley!  :)

Offline hopfenundmalz

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #80 on: February 20, 2021, 12:35:46 AM »
Y’all should write a book.
I would buy it.

Jeff Rankert
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Home-brewing, not just a hobby, it is a lifestyle!

Offline Bilsch

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #81 on: February 20, 2021, 12:57:46 AM »
Couple problems with that. It's not any single persons data to sell, it belongs to everyone who participated. And a book would go against the idea of communally sharing the knowledge. Besides (IMO) it's an outdated communication method that does not work well with dynamic topics that are constantly being refined and updated.

Offline majorvices

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #82 on: February 20, 2021, 04:17:40 PM »
I said it earlier and Ill say it again! THAT IS THE BADDEST BAD ASS HOME BREW SET UP I HAVE EVER LAID MY JEALOUS EYES ON! We all have our degree of obsession with our own hobbies and this guy is at the apex of homebrewing systems, ever!!

Good for you Sir!

See, I'd have to disagree with that.  I don't see bigger, more complex systems as necessarily better.  If others do,  no problem.
From what Bilsch says above, it's less about homebrew and more about science and experimentation.  it's fancier than even some of the most sophisticated breweries and pretty cool that he can afford the time and money for such a project.

It's an awesome brewery/lab/whatever. I have worked on two different 30 bbl brew house breweries that have colandria/3 vessel/steam/etc. that also had inhouse labs and the brew house/labs that were no where near as complex as what is going on here from what I can tell. If he's got the money and the passion why the hell not? Not sure why anyone would be anything but impressed by this.

Personally if I had that bank roll to spend I would unload it on my motorcycle, or stereo equipment, back packing gear, ...etc. I'm pretty satisfied with what I have as far as homebrewery goes. But I can certainly appreciate Rabe's brewery .... it's freaking awesome.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2021, 04:21:20 PM by majorvices »

Offline chinaski

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #83 on: February 20, 2021, 05:36:34 PM »
There are at least 5 of these Stout Brucontrol based systems of varying level of installed data gathering sensors now in operation and people get really interesting ideas all the time on what to test. For example, in the past brewers have wondered and tried to calculate/guess, how long it takes for ferment CO2 to bring an empty keg down to zero oxygen. So someone with a system like this and the probes decided to actually test how long it took. He had O2 sensors in the keg and one in the outflow stream just to be sure the data was good. Now we know the actual answer, not just a guess. We also know how long it actually takes the yeast DO method to scavenge all the O2 in the strike water, what is the best dose of yeast and sugar and how do different temperatures effect that speed. Also how long the water will hold at zero DO. Another guy also has a nitrogen generator and set out to find out how long it takes to purge the grist to zero DO. We also found out how many purge/fill cycles is takes a beer gun type filler to bring a bottle down to zero DO. Currently there is a lot of work going on about getting the most out of grain enzymes and improving attenuation. These are just a few examples of the mounds of data that is amassing.

It used to be when you asked a question on a brewing forum about some process, the best answer you could get was, "I tried that but didn't notice any difference".

This seems like the analytical/instrumentation-based version that is somewhat analogous to the Brulosophy crew that does a (limited and/or biased) sensory analysis typically.  I think it would be very cool to pair the analytical experimental results in a well-replicated fashion with a trained and consistent sensory panel.  It's a tall order I know- but then you could get whether the differences documented the analytical equipment matters in terms of sensory data, and by how much.



Offline Richard

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #84 on: February 21, 2021, 03:16:47 AM »
Couple problems with that. It's not any single persons data to sell, it belongs to everyone who participated. And a book would go against the idea of communally sharing the knowledge. Besides (IMO) it's an outdated communication method that does not work well with dynamic topics that are constantly being refined and updated.

Their solution is to charge for access to the web site. You can only make someone pay for a book once (and the publisher takes a cut), but you can charge a monthly fee for access to the web site, and that also gives you the freedom to change anything at any time!
From https://www.themodernbrewhouse.com/new-year-update/

If you are looking for the most up to date information from us, packages start at $5/mo and go up from there. Even at $5/mo you will learn more in a day here, than the years you wasted paying the AHA for cheap and easy drivel. If you want to make the best beer humanly possible, this is the only place you will find that obtainable.

Cheap and easy drivel? Wow!
Original Gravity - that would be Newton's

Offline fredthecat

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #85 on: February 21, 2021, 04:18:41 AM »

Their solution is to charge for access to the web site. You can only make someone pay for a book once (and the publisher takes a cut), but you can charge a monthly fee for access to the web site, and that also gives you the freedom to change anything at any time!
From https://www.themodernbrewhouse.com/new-year-update/

If you are looking for the most up to date information from us, packages start at $5/mo and go up from there. Even at $5/mo you will learn more in a day here, than the years you wasted paying the AHA for cheap and easy drivel. If you want to make the best beer humanly possible, this is the only place you will find that obtainable.

Cheap and easy drivel? Wow!

wow did he explicitly say AHA? lol i can think of much, much worse homebrew forums. what a weird dude. again, he should learn some german if he is so obsessive about "tradition" aka just the contemporary forms of bavarian beer.



This seems like the analytical/instrumentation-based version that is somewhat analogous to the Brulosophy crew that does a (limited and/or biased) sensory analysis typically.  I think it would be very cool to pair the analytical experimental results in a well-replicated fashion with a trained and consistent sensory panel.  It's a tall order I know- but then you could get whether the differences documented the analytical equipment matters in terms of sensory data, and by how much.

related in a way, but i just get the feeling that a lot of the brulosophy new exbeerimenters have "Just started homebrewing two years ago and have really gotten into it. really into kolsch, hazy IPAs and sours". i simply don't respect their opinions, don't care if they have "X certification" because they are in "X local club" and they can get certified at their leisure.

Offline majorvices

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Re: My Professional Basement Brewery
« Reply #86 on: February 21, 2021, 12:45:08 PM »
This has gotten pointless and has devolved into trolling.
« Last Edit: February 21, 2021, 03:26:46 PM by majorvices »