Author Topic: Control panel  (Read 496 times)

Offline weazletoe

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Control panel
« on: October 22, 2018, 03:56:44 PM »
Rebuilding my panel. Again... Third time is a charm. Pretty much have all the high voltage wiring done with the exception of out to the kettles. Still have to tidy it up. Hope to do that and begin on the low voltage this week.



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Offline Wilbur

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Re: Control panel
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2018, 04:16:57 PM »
Any lessons learned? I've been debating between building my own, buying a pre fab, or just getting a system (zymatic, robobrew, etc.).

Offline weazletoe

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Re: Control panel
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2018, 04:33:27 PM »
Any lessons learned? I've been debating between building my own, buying a pre fab, or just getting a system (zymatic, robobrew, etc.).

  BUILD YOUR OWN! Not only will you have something that you can take a lot of pride in, you'll know your system intimately, in was you never would something you bought. It's also much cheaper. And a lot of fun.
 Though I'm making it up  on the fly after looking at the Electric Brewery for a while I'll be happy to answer any questions you have and do anything I can to assist.
 
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Offline yugamrap

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Re: Control panel
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2018, 07:32:19 PM »
Any lessons learned? I've been debating between building my own, buying a pre fab, or just getting a system (zymatic, robobrew, etc.).

  BUILD YOUR OWN! Not only will you have something that you can take a lot of pride in, you'll know your system intimately, in was you never would something you bought. It's also much cheaper. And a lot of fun.
 Though I'm making it up  on the fly after looking at the Electric Brewery for a while I'll be happy to answer any questions you have and do anything I can to assist.
 

This is good advice if you have the skills and time - you really can save a good amount of money.  I started down the DIY route about a year ago to convert my propane system with keggles and a cooler mash tun to an indoor, all-electric HERMS.  I was using the Spike System (which includes a control panel from Electric Brewing) as a sort of template for the project.  Once I priced out everything - including switching all fittings and valves to from brass to stainless, adding another pump, and the necessary electrical, plumbing and ventilation work - I ended up buying the Spike System ("buy once, cry once").

I have the skills to have done it all, but I'm at a point in my life where my wife and I have some discretionary income and my time is at a premium.  I spent the time I would have spent on the control panel wiring on other work for getting the new brewery ready.  With all of the work I did in decision-making, I think I understand the control panel about as well as if I'd assembled it myself. 

This may not be the path for you, but I'm really happy with my decision.   
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Offline weazletoe

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Re: Control panel
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2018, 08:28:28 PM »
I might have to take a run up there some day and check it out.
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Offline David

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Re: Control panel
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2019, 12:14:56 AM »
Any lessons learned? I've been debating between building my own, buying a pre fab, or just getting a system (zymatic, robobrew, etc.).

  BUILD YOUR OWN! Not only will you have something that you can take a lot of pride in, you'll know your system intimately, in was you never would something you bought. It's also much cheaper. And a lot of fun.
 Though I'm making it up  on the fly after looking at the Electric Brewery for a while I'll be happy to answer any questions you have and do anything I can to assist.
 
I am also in the process of building a control panel based on the Electric Brewery controller, I have some questions about yours:
Do you find it truly necessary to monitor your voltage/current? I was toying with the idea of leaving this out of mine as I don't see the benefit. Perhaps I am missing something.
The touch screen on yours, what is it, what is the function, and how did you wire it into the system?

Offline yugamrap

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Re: Control panel
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2019, 08:53:04 PM »
Any lessons learned? I've been debating between building my own, buying a pre fab, or just getting a system (zymatic, robobrew, etc.).

  BUILD YOUR OWN! Not only will you have something that you can take a lot of pride in, you'll know your system intimately, in was you never would something you bought. It's also much cheaper. And a lot of fun.
 Though I'm making it up  on the fly after looking at the Electric Brewery for a while I'll be happy to answer any questions you have and do anything I can to assist.
 
I am also in the process of building a control panel based on the Electric Brewery controller, I have some questions about yours:
Do you find it truly necessary to monitor your voltage/current? I was toying with the idea of leaving this out of mine as I don't see the benefit. Perhaps I am missing something.
The touch screen on yours, what is it, what is the function, and how did you wire it into the system?

The control panels that come with the Spike System and others (e..g, High Gravity) don't monitor voltage or current.  I wouldn't worry about it as long as you have your system on an adequate circuit for the power that it will draw.  My Spike System with two 5500-watt elements and two Chugger pumps all runs from the system control panel which is on a dedicated 220-volt / 50 Amp-GFCI-protected circuit - and I can run it all simultaneously at full-tilt (though I seldom need to do that).  The elements are what really draws the current - the pumps and controls don't draw much.
...it's liquid bread, it's good for you!