Author Topic: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study  (Read 5163 times)

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #90 on: November 17, 2018, 02:12:45 AM »
There's more grist to the mill, Suregork has updated with Wyeast and dry strains :
https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/from-the-lab-family-tree-of-white-labs-yeast.642831/#post-8444803
Well, there goes my weekend.  ;)

Ha!  I'm going to digest it sometime next week maybe.  I'm tired.  Maybe I'll have another beer and fall asleep.  Sounds nice.  :)
Dave

The world will become a much more pleasant place to live when each and every one of us realizes that we are all idiots.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #91 on: November 18, 2018, 02:06:38 AM »
Aw man!  It was a longshot.  It wasn't identified as a lager yeast so, yeah.  Would like to know where it's from if you're allowed to share.  It does have its own evolutionary branch.

Sorry, but I'm not.  But if you really wanted to dig,I think the info is out there.

I really have to question why you would participate in the discussion, if you can’t divulge information...maybe I just don’t know what information has proprietary protection and how that applies  here....
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #92 on: November 18, 2018, 08:17:52 PM »
I really have to question why you would participate in the discussion, if you can’t divulge information...maybe I just don’t know what information has proprietary protection and how that applies  here....

Seems fair enough to me - there's proprietary information he can't share specifically, but can answer the question asked above by saying something more general. No big deal.

Yeast companies are notoriously secretive about the sources of their yeast, as there are some complicated legal/IP questions surrounding them so they don't want those sources to be in the public domain.

Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #93 on: November 19, 2018, 12:31:22 PM »
I really have to question why you would participate in the discussion, if you can’t divulge information...maybe I just don’t know what information has proprietary protection and how that applies  here....

Seems fair enough to me - there's proprietary information he can't share specifically, but can answer the question asked above by saying something more general. No big deal.

Yeast companies are notoriously secretive about the sources of their yeast, as there are some complicated legal/IP questions surrounding them so they don't want those sources to be in the public domain.

I suppose you are right, especially if it was disclosed in confidence.  I thought this was about genome sequencing in an open sharing of non-protected information and then best guesses made based on that.  I wouldn’t want a patent infringement to occur.  As I see it genome sequencing is pretty much reverse engineering in a biology format, but maybe I don’t appreciate the nuances here.
Hodge Garage Brewing: "Brew with a glad heart!"

Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Interesting Data from the yeast Genome Study
« Reply #94 on: November 19, 2018, 03:43:35 PM »
The whole IP situation with yeast is mess - in some cases you have European breweries who have sold beer to wholesalers, who've sold to retailers in Europe, who have sold beer to unknow tourists from the US, who have taken bottles home and harvested yeast and passed it around their friends for free, who have passed it to the US yeast labs, who have made multi-$m businesses out of selling yeast to homebrewers in jurisdictions around the world and to multi-$100m's commercial breweries.

It's not really in anybody's interest to unravel that can of worms. Yes, genome sequencing can tell you a lot, but it's a lot more valuable if you can pin strains to particular breweries at particular times in history. Three years ago, we had to rely almost entirely on internet legend, whereas now we have a surfeit of DNA data and the history side is lacking in comparison. But you can resolve the two somewhat, by taking brewery strains (Tim Taylor, Fulller's etc) and doing DNA tests on their actual yeast, to see if it is closely related to homebrew strains that the internet thinks came from that brewery. That's a phase II which is starting to happen...

You also have the whole conflict between academia (where much of the public sequencing has happened) and commercial interests (even among the original breweries, some are very open with information and others are complete closed books).