Author Topic: Manometer  (Read 2710 times)

Offline Robert

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #45 on: January 15, 2019, 01:56:48 PM »
Very clean install. That should work well.

However, as Robert already pointed out, the grid seams to lie flat on the bottom of the vessel while the edges allow flow thru the bevel of the grid. I wonder if the center grid panels could be notched with a dremel every half inch, or so to promote flow under the grid without sacrificing strength.


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That notching just might do it.  Worth a try for sure.  I'd be inclined to replace the grid with some kind of stand on feet to completely clear the space under the false bottom.

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Rob Stein
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Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #46 on: January 15, 2019, 02:23:39 PM »
I had the same suspicions when I first got the grid stand. I notched the bottom of each of the center grid walls 1/8" deep x an inch wide with a bench grinder probably 15 batches ago. I've considered notching wider and deeper but that stuff is not easy to grind down.

Offline Robert

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #47 on: January 15, 2019, 02:47:29 PM »
I had the same suspicions when I first got the grid stand. I notched the bottom of each of the center grid walls 1/8" deep x an inch wide with a bench grinder probably 15 batches ago. I've considered notching wider and deeper but that stuff is not easy to grind down.
So grinding is difficult.   Would it be possible to drill through the false bottom, or is that made of "adamantium" too?  If you can drill it, you could just run through 4 stainless bolts to serve as legs, easily adjustable to the correct height and not affecting flow at all.  Or if you have access to a welder (as in person or equipment) legs could be attached.   Until recently I would have just said, "have NorCal fabricate something for you."  But sadly I here they're going out of business.

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Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #48 on: January 15, 2019, 03:56:11 PM »
I don't think the false bottom would be supported enough to just put some feet on it. I do agree that the way the grid sits on the bottom of the tun and walls off sections is a concern and might still impede flow, even with the notches I've put in it. I'm a procrastinator but I'm not a quitter. I'll find a way to improve it.

Offline Robert

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #49 on: January 15, 2019, 04:25:41 PM »
Basically an old piece of junk I haven't used in forever, just remembered I haven't scrapped it yet.   But it shows an idea of how "feet" can be made fairly sturdy.

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Rob Stein
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Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #50 on: January 15, 2019, 04:47:27 PM »
I was able to notch it with a pair of aviation snips. Now my hand hurts. Obviously I need to clean up the edges but what do you think? Still strong enough to support all 200# of me.

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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #51 on: January 15, 2019, 05:10:50 PM »
I think that should do great.  As an old Avn Mech the snips were a great choice.


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Offline Robert

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #52 on: January 15, 2019, 05:28:37 PM »
That looks great!  Report after your next brew if you see a significant difference (pretty sure you will.)

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Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

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Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #53 on: January 15, 2019, 05:54:37 PM »
Thanks for the insight and motivation.

Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #54 on: January 16, 2019, 12:32:41 AM »
Tinkered with my crush. .040 on the left, .045 on the right.
With the .040 there's clearly still some flour. With the .045 just husks and grits. Should look even better with properly conditioned grain.

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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #55 on: January 16, 2019, 02:30:29 AM »
Tinkered with my crush. .040 on the left, .045 on the right.
With the .040 there's clearly still some flour. With the .045 just husks and grits. Should look even better with properly conditioned grain.

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I believe the best crush for you will depend on your system and how you operate it. Somewhat trial and error based on an education guess.


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Offline Robert

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #56 on: January 16, 2019, 02:43:18 AM »
I might not change the crush at all on the next brew.  You've already modified the flow pattern under the false bottom, and installed the manometers to allow adjustment of your flow rate.  If you change too many factors at once, you'll never know which one made what difference.   Dial in the system incrementally and methodically,  would be my approach.

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Rob Stein
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Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #57 on: January 16, 2019, 10:46:35 AM »
At this point I just want to have a properly recirculating mash.
I was interested in the manometer to help me see what's going on and to take the guesswork out of adjusting my flow rate and get repeatable results going forward. I've looked into the linear flow valve and I'll likely replace the ball valve on the pump outlet with one in the near future. But flow rate was likely only a part of the problem.
I had suspected for a while now that the rack needed further modification.
I recently replaced my old, worn out mill and didn't have the new one dialed in yet. I'm sure I'll continue to tinker with it over the next couple batches. But for now I'd like to start with minimal flour and hopefully get a nice clear runoff.


Offline BrewBama

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #58 on: January 16, 2019, 11:45:04 PM »
I think you’ve made some positive advancements. 

I agree that traditional troubleshooting techniques prescribe one change at a time but (if you’re like me) I don’t brew enough to get the results I need as quickly as I need making one adjustment.  It might take the rest of the year to get a desired result.

However, I recently had a couple failures due to something I did when I made numerous equipment and process changes at once. I had to take a couple steps back and think I determined the culprit. That was a couple brew mistake which is a significant hit to a four beer pipeline (two on tap, one conditioning, one fermenting). I had to expedite a couple brews which could have been better had I been able to apply my normal timeline.


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“From man’s sweat and God’s love, beer came into the world.” — St. Arnold

Brewed in the Tennessee Valley. Rocket City — Huntsville AL

Offline Joe T

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Re: Manometer
« Reply #59 on: January 17, 2019, 10:44:47 AM »
I think you’ve made some positive advancements. 

I agree that traditional troubleshooting techniques prescribe one change at a time but (if you’re like me) I don’t brew enough to get the results I need as quickly as I need making one adjustment.  It might take the rest of the year to get a desired result.

However, I recently had a couple failures due to something I did when I made numerous equipment and process changes at once. I had to take a couple steps back and think I determined the culprit. That was a couple brew mistake which is a significant hit to a four beer pipeline (two on tap, one conditioning, one fermenting). I had to expedite a couple brews which could have been better had I been able to apply my normal timeline.


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Exactly right. I embrace learning from my failures, but I just want it to work right now. I may have shirked proper troubleshooting procedure but I've still learned more than someone who just goes out and buys something like a Grainfather, with all due respect for those who take that route.
May I ask about your recent failures and how you found the culprit? It's much better to learn from others' mistakes.