Author Topic: Fermentation  (Read 648 times)

Offline Jim L

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Fermentation
« on: January 17, 2019, 11:58:04 PM »
can I ferment a 3 gal. batch in a 6.5 fermentor

Offline tommymorris

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2019, 12:39:02 AM »
Yes. It will be mostly empty but it will be fine.

Offline dmtaylor

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2019, 01:50:56 AM »
Of course you can.
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Offline Robert

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2019, 02:17:51 AM »
It is much tidier than fermenting a 6.5 gallon batch in a 3 gallon fermenter.  ;)   

Seriously, it is advantageous to use a fermenter  considerably larger than batch size; you shouldn't need a blow off.  I ferment 6 gallon batches in a 10 gallon fermenter.

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« Last Edit: January 18, 2019, 02:27:44 AM by Robert »
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Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2019, 11:38:26 AM »
OTOH I once had a leak in a bucket which meant I ended up fermenting one of a 4-way split batch as 1 gallon in a 5 gallon bucket - it was horribly oxidised compared to the other splits fermented in a 1g bucket.

Offline Robert

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2019, 01:20:04 PM »
OTOH I once had a leak in a bucket which meant I ended up fermenting one of a 4-way split batch as 1 gallon in a 5 gallon bucket - it was horribly oxidised compared to the other splits fermented in a 1g bucket.
Type of fermenter may be significant.  My oversized fermenter is a closed, stainless pressure vessel (10 gallon corny type tank)  so once fermentation expels the initial oxygen, none is present as there is no gas exchange with the atmosphere.   If there is a possibility of exchange, more gas in the headspace could, I suppose,  be detrimental.
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Offline ynotbrusum

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2019, 10:49:06 PM »
OTOH I once had a leak in a bucket which meant I ended up fermenting one of a 4-way split batch as 1 gallon in a 5 gallon bucket - it was horribly oxidised compared to the other splits fermented in a 1g bucket.
Type of fermenter may be significant.  My oversized fermenter is a closed, stainless pressure vessel (10 gallon corny type tank)  so once fermentation expels the initial oxygen, none is present as there is no gas exchange with the atmosphere.   If there is a possibility of exchange, more gas in the headspace could, I suppose,  be detrimental.

So, Robert do you ferment without a blowoff and rely on a spunding valve set at a particular pressure?  If so, what pressure level do you ferment at?
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Offline Robert

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2019, 01:28:11 AM »
OTOH I once had a leak in a bucket which meant I ended up fermenting one of a 4-way split batch as 1 gallon in a 5 gallon bucket - it was horribly oxidised compared to the other splits fermented in a 1g bucket.
Type of fermenter may be significant.  My oversized fermenter is a closed, stainless pressure vessel (10 gallon corny type tank)  so once fermentation expels the initial oxygen, none is present as there is no gas exchange with the atmosphere.   If there is a possibility of exchange, more gas in the headspace could, I suppose,  be detrimental.

So, Robert do you ferment without a blowoff and rely on a spunding valve set at a particular pressure?  If so, what pressure level do you ferment at?

No, this simple airlock arrangement serves during active fermentation.   For cold crashing I remove the "airlock" and apply a few psig before cooling.  I do have a spunding valve, but have never used it.   This seemed a much easier solution.   Maybe someday I'll try a pressure fermentation.

EDIT  If anyone can advise on what would be an appropriate pressure to set the spunding valve to -- strictly for fermentation purposes, not carbonation -- I would appreciate it, and look forward to trying this setup.
 

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« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 02:44:57 AM by Robert »
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Offline BrewBama

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« Last Edit: January 23, 2019, 02:31:04 PM by BrewBama »
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Offline Robert

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2019, 03:13:06 PM »
Thanks.  I'll have to play around with my spunding valve to dial it in (from MoreBeer,  no calibration marks, but I gather the only thing that matters is the gauge.)  I got it for this purpose; as it only goes to 15 psig, it won't do for carbonating at fermentation temperature.   But 5ish sounds perfect as it will not significantly carbonate,  but solves my other problem of getting a CO2 supply to the ferm chamber to draw samples.  This weekend I expect to brew, and I'll try a ~5 psig fermentation.  I'll report in a separate thread.

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Offline DavieN

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2019, 11:15:49 AM »
5-6 PSI seems to be the consensus. http://brulosophy.com/2015/04/27/under-pressure-the-impact-of-higher-psi-fermentations-exbeeriment-results-2/

...or 8   http://brulosophy.com/2015/09/07/under-pressure-pt-2-the-impact-of-pressurized-fermentation-on-saison-xbmt-results/

...or 12. http://brulosophy.com/2016/06/13/under-pressure-pt-3-the-impact-of-pressurized-fermentation-on-lager-exbeeriment-results/

LOL. 

White Labs recommends “under 1.0 bar (14.7 PSI) until final gravity is obtained, generally in one week.” for its WLP925 yeast. https://www.whitelabs.com/yeast-bank/wlp925-high-pressure-lager-yeast

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You have to play around with the PRV.....i had to keep an eye on it but levelled out at 12 PSI.....Stayed steady for 3-4 days during fermentation then the pressure dropped to 6 PSI and stopped and has remained steady for 2 days. Am I correct in assuming the beer is ready for transfer to a keg.

Offline Robert

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Re: Fermentation
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2019, 12:33:28 PM »
5-6 PSI seems to be the consensus. http://brulosophy.com/2015/04/27/under-pressure-the-impact-of-higher-psi-fermentations-exbeeriment-results-2/

...or 8   http://brulosophy.com/2015/09/07/under-pressure-pt-2-the-impact-of-pressurized-fermentation-on-saison-xbmt-results/

...or 12. http://brulosophy.com/2016/06/13/under-pressure-pt-3-the-impact-of-pressurized-fermentation-on-lager-exbeeriment-results/

LOL. 

White Labs recommends “under 1.0 bar (14.7 PSI) until final gravity is obtained, generally in one week.” for its WLP925 yeast. https://www.whitelabs.com/yeast-bank/wlp925-high-pressure-lager-yeast

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You have to play around with the PRV.....i had to keep an eye on it but levelled out at 12 PSI.....Stayed steady for 3-4 days during fermentation then the pressure dropped to 6 PSI and stopped and has remained steady for 2 days. Am I correct in assuming the beer is ready for transfer to a keg.

I'm reporting on my experience with pressure fermentation here
https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=33013.0

I don't think pressure readings are the guide to progress; like any fermentation you need to track the density.
Rob Stein
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