Author Topic: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging  (Read 272 times)

Offline HopDen

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Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« on: February 05, 2019, 12:18:00 PM »
I double batched an Imperial Stout destined for a bourbon barrel. I think I extracted a bit more tannins than would be wanted from the dark malts. 2nd batch stayed in contact with mash water longer than I planned due to a 90 minute boil of the first batch. My question is this: Would the excess tannins actually be favorable going into the barrel much like a tannic wine benefits from barrel aging? I am assuming the tannins will actually protect the beer as it ages but that is only a guess and not based off of any past experience.

Any thoughts?
Any similar experiences?

Thanks

Offline KellerBrauer

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2019, 12:43:14 PM »
My suggestion would be to follow through with your plan and taste a sample every few days or few weeks, whichever the case may be, and stop the infusion as soon as you feel necessary.  I’m thinking you’ll be okay.
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Offline jeffy

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #2 on: February 05, 2019, 01:09:59 PM »
I am not so sure that a longer mash will extract tannins from dark or roast malts.  That has more to do with higher pH during sparge than the recipe's malt bill.
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Offline goose

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #3 on: February 05, 2019, 03:50:15 PM »
I am not so sure that a longer mash will extract tannins from dark or roast malts.  That has more to do with higher pH during sparge than the recipe's malt bill.

Higher pH and higher sparge temp.  If one is off you are probably OK.  If both are off then you could extract tannins.
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Offline denny

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #4 on: February 05, 2019, 03:53:12 PM »
I am not so sure that a longer mash will extract tannins from dark or roast malts.  That has more to do with higher pH during sparge than the recipe's malt bill.

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Offline kramerog

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2019, 05:36:30 PM »
I think I extracted a bit more tannins than would be wanted from the dark malts. 2nd batch stayed in contact with mash water longer than I planned due to a 90 minute boil of the first batch. My question is this: Would the excess tannins actually be favorable going into the barrel much like a tannic wine benefits from barrel aging? I am assuming the tannins will actually protect the beer as it ages but that is only a guess and not based off of any past experience.

The barrel may also provide tannins depending on how many uses of the barrel there have been and how long you age.  If you are using a fresh bourbon barrel, the beer will probably improve for the first ~3 months as the primary taste effects are sweetening from the char and extraction of the bourbon.  After ~3 months, tannin extraction becomes increasingly important.   If you got too many tannins - I'm not sure that roasted malts have much tannin if any and other posters have expressed some skepticism whether too much tannin was extracted - I would limit the length of aging in the barrel subject to tastings every 2 weeks or so.

Offline HopDen

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #6 on: February 05, 2019, 11:15:06 PM »
Ok, mash pH was 5.37 with salts and lactic & sparge was 5.61 with phosphoric addition. Spare temp was 168. IBU's 75. I don't think that is too high for an Imperial Stout but may just have been my taste perception.

Well, after some time in the barrel(minimum 4 months) and then cold conditioned for a few more, maybe it will tame down.

Hey! Relax, don't worry, have a home brew.

Thanks everyone!

Offline HopDen

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #7 on: February 17, 2019, 05:10:06 PM »
So a little update. Apparently when I tasted the bitterness in this beer I was tasting the sample at colder temperatures. I put the beer into a 25 gallon bourbon barrel and the rest into some kegs. As usual, there was some left over that basically is waste but I always save some for tasting. I let it warm up to room temps whilst cleaning and the bitterness is all but gone. So, is bitterness perception tied to temperature?

Opinions definitely welcome!

Online Robert

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Re: Tannin extraction/Barrel aging
« Reply #8 on: February 17, 2019, 05:31:43 PM »


So, is bitterness perception tied to temperature?



It does seem to be. Serving temperature can dramatically change the perception of any beer.  But I'm not sure it's a case of hops expressing more at colder temperatures.  It could be that other balancing flavors are suppressed at low temperatures.   Get cold enough and you can't taste a thing, which is why it's wise to serve Budweiser near absolute zero.  Now there's an opinion.
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