Author Topic: US-05 Startup Time  (Read 1126 times)

Offline dak0415

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US-05 Startup Time
« on: August 16, 2010, 05:44:19 AM »
This is only the second time I have used dry yeast.  What startup times have you all been recording for US-05?  Wort at 62deg, 1.051 SG, sprinkle method, wait 2 hours for yeast to settle, then oxygen with sintered stone for 2 minutes.

Thanks;
Dave
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Offline babalu87

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #1 on: August 16, 2010, 05:46:17 AM »
Around 24 hours for anything we would recognize as activity
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Offline bluesman

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #2 on: August 16, 2010, 06:10:25 AM »
+1

This yeast behaves pretty consistently.  In my experience it also finishes fairly quickly.
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Offline blatz

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #3 on: August 16, 2010, 06:53:07 AM »
This is only the second time I have used dry yeast.  What startup times have you all been recording for US-05?  Wort at 62deg, 1.051 SG, sprinkle method, wait 2 hours for yeast to settle, then oxygen with sintered stone for 2 minutes.

Thanks;
Dave

never heard of oxygenating AFTER pitching yeast.  I've always done before - what was the reasoning there?

18-30 hours is a good range to expect.
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Offline dak0415

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2010, 07:21:04 AM »
never heard of oxygenating AFTER pitching yeast.  I've always done before - what was the reasoning there?

18-30 hours is a good range to expect.

I have just ALWAYS done it that way.  I guess someone told me that it helps mix up the (liquid) yeast.  And that's when I started was using air and an aquarium stone. (About 60 batches ago)  I've been using O2 for a couple of years, just for the time savings.

Dave
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Offline wingnut

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2010, 07:26:02 AM »
I just brewed a batch with US-05... Took 12-24 hours to start.  By 36 it had a thick layer of yeast on top.  A week later, still a large layer of yeast, but at terminal gravity.  Chilled to 40, and the yeast have settled out after three days. 

I am now ready to rack, but I am waiting on a regulator for my keg system. 

Good luck
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Offline dak0415

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #6 on: August 16, 2010, 07:46:52 AM »
Is US-05=WY1056=WLP001?  Origins seem to be the same but the characteristics are described differently.

Dave
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Offline bluesman

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #7 on: August 16, 2010, 07:48:03 AM »
Is US-05=WY1056=WLP001?  Origins seem to be the same but the characteristics are described differently.

Dave

Yes that is my understanding.
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Offline denny

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2010, 08:57:00 AM »
Is US-05=WY1056=WLP001?  Origins seem to be the same but the characteristics are described differently.

Dave

Although the origins are the same, there are some difference that have developed between them over the years.  But they're really close.
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Offline tschmidlin

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2010, 10:41:38 AM »
Is US-05=WY1056=WLP001?  Origins seem to be the same but the characteristics are described differently.

Dave

Although the origins are the same, there are some difference that have developed between them over the years.  But they're really close.
I just brewed an APA with US-05 in one carboy and WY1056 in the other.  I can't tell a difference between them, but the flavor differences may be covered up by the hops.  They finished within 1 point of each other with a basic wide range hydrometer.
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Offline The Professor

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #10 on: August 16, 2010, 05:03:09 PM »
never heard of oxygenating AFTER pitching yeast.  I've always done before - what was the reasoning there?

18-30 hours is a good range to expect.

I have just ALWAYS done it that way.  I guess someone told me that it helps mix up the (liquid) yeast.  And that's when I started was using air and an aquarium stone. (About 60 batches ago)  I've been using O2 for a couple of years, just for the time savings.

Dave

I've always done it that way too...before AND after, actually.  For the first day I shake the hell out of the fermenter a few times over the course of the day.
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Offline bluesman

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #11 on: August 16, 2010, 06:49:42 PM »
never heard of oxygenating AFTER pitching yeast.  I've always done before - what was the reasoning there?

18-30 hours is a good range to expect.

I have just ALWAYS done it that way.  I guess someone told me that it helps mix up the (liquid) yeast.  And that's when I started was using air and an aquarium stone. (About 60 batches ago)  I've been using O2 for a couple of years, just for the time savings.

Dave

I've always done it that way too...before AND after, actually.  For the first day I shake the hell out of the fermenter a few times over the course of the day.

I've always aerated before pitching, but it's definitely done both ways.  Some yeast manufacturers recommend aerating with pure O2 through an aeration stone right after pitching the yeast.  IMHO, It really shouldn't make much of a difference aerating before or after pitching at this stage of the game.
Ron Price

Offline tubercle

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2010, 09:46:43 PM »
As long as the temp and atmospheric pressure stays the same before or after shouldn't matter much. Saturated is just that.

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Offline dhacker

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #13 on: August 17, 2010, 04:44:41 AM »
I've heard oxygen can damage yeast cell wall membranes if there is too much O2 in solution. I think it would be difficult to achieve that if you oxygenated pre-pitch . .easier if you oxygenated post-pitch.
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Offline dak0415

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Re: US-05 Startup Time
« Reply #14 on: August 17, 2010, 07:06:45 AM »
I did have a brain fart one time after I switched to O2.  I got distracted (no not drinking, I learned not to do that while brewing years ago) and left the O2 on for 35 minutes(foam coming out the top of the carboy).  The beer tasted a little off, but what I noticed was my house yeast, which usually drops clear, stayed very hazy.  Couldn't clear it up!  It's like I "burned" the yeast.  When I repitched the yeast (aerating properly) it did the same thing.
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