Author Topic: temps  (Read 395 times)

Offline Pope of Dope

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temps
« on: February 10, 2019, 07:11:28 PM »
Quick and basic question: After the first week or two of ferment under proper temps., gravity now being mostly unchanged or even if there is a stuck ferment, is it alright to raise temps to mid-high 70's--above "optimal" temps for that yeast strain?

Or, always keep temps in range?
Generally you don't see that kind of behavior in a major appliance.

Offline chezteth

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Re: temps
« Reply #1 on: February 10, 2019, 07:20:24 PM »
Quick and basic question: After the first week or two of ferment under proper temps., gravity now being mostly unchanged or even if there is a stuck ferment, is it alright to raise temps to mid-high 70's--above "optimal" temps for that yeast strain?

Or, always keep temps in range?
Yes, it's ok to raise the temp.

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Offline Robert

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Re: temps
« Reply #2 on: February 10, 2019, 07:37:27 PM »
To the temps you're talking,  yes.  Don't go too high for the strain (say 80s or 90s unless its Bekgian or Norwegian) where you'll stress it, or of course high enough to kill it.  But in any temperature controlled environment you're probably good.  Don't set it in your garden shed in the summer.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: temps
« Reply #3 on: February 10, 2019, 07:48:11 PM »
According to Chris White “Diacetyl reduction is slower at colder temperatures, so it is essential to incorporate the diacetyl rest when making cold fermented lagers. The process is simply to raise the fermentation temperature from lager temperatures (50-55F) to 65-68F [I use 70*F] for a two day period near the close of the fermentation. Usually the diacetyl rest is begun when the beer is 2 to 5 specific gravity points away from the target terminal gravity. The temperature is then lowered to conditioning temperature following diacetyl reduction.

For ale production, the fermentation temperature is usually 65-70F, so temperature modification is not necessary [I usually ferment Ales at 65*F so raise temp by 5*F]. But the fermentation should still be "rested" at this temperature for two days to ensure proper diacetyl reduction.”

Ref: https://www.whitelabs.com/sites/default/files/Diacetyl_Time_Line.pdf


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Offline denny

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Re: temps
« Reply #4 on: February 10, 2019, 07:50:15 PM »
I raise the temp to 70-72 after 4-5 days for every beer I make, ale or lager.
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Offline Robert

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Re: temps
« Reply #5 on: February 10, 2019, 08:10:12 PM »
I raise the temp to 70-72 after 4-5 days for every beer I make, ale or lager.
Same here.  (Actually even sooner for ales.  Just wait till at least 50% AA.)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2019, 08:13:35 PM by Robert »
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Offline denny

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Re: temps
« Reply #6 on: February 10, 2019, 08:32:45 PM »
I raise the temp to 70-72 after 4-5 days for every beer I make, ale or lager.
Same here.  (Actually even sooner for ales.  Just wait till at least 50% AA.)

Being lazy....er, pragmatic...I figure at 4-5 days it's at 50% and I don't check it.
Life begins at 60.....1.060, that is!

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Offline robdogj

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Re: temps
« Reply #7 on: March 10, 2019, 05:06:31 PM »
According to Chris White “Diacetyl reduction is slower at colder temperatures, so it is essential to incorporate the diacetyl rest when making cold fermented lagers. The process is simply to raise the fermentation temperature from lager temperatures (50-55F) to 65-68F [I use 70*F] for a two day period near the close of the fermentation. Usually the diacetyl rest is begun when the beer is 2 to 5 specific gravity points away from the target terminal gravity. The temperature is then lowered to conditioning temperature following diacetyl reduction.

For ale production, the fermentation temperature is usually 65-70F, so temperature modification is not necessary [I usually ferment Ales at 65*F so raise temp by 5*F]. But the fermentation should still be "rested" at this temperature for two days to ensure proper diacetyl reduction.”

Ref: https://www.whitelabs.com/sites/default/files/Diacetyl_Time_Line.pdf


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Thanks for that tidbit. Now the problem I have is this 3 gallon carboy of wort that I added a .5 cup of water w/ gelatin. I was attempting to clear up the wort but I inadvertently started a 2nd fermentation. I going to lower the temp of the wort even more now, but I am sure your insights will help me 100%.
Thanks!!!

Offline Robert

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Re: temps
« Reply #8 on: March 10, 2019, 05:14:09 PM »
Are you sure you restarted fermentation?   If it's just that you're seeing bubbles in the airlock, that could be nothing more than CO2 gassing off out of solution.  Check gravity to determine if there's ongoing fermentation.
Rob Stein
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Offline robdogj

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Re: temps
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2019, 11:50:03 PM »
Are you sure you restarted fermentation?

Yes, I had foam in the airlock & I had to put in a blowout tube instead