Author Topic: s04 and other fast strains  (Read 722 times)

Offline narcout

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #15 on: February 27, 2019, 07:17:25 PM »
Removes the potential convenience, but I'm looking at dry yeast simply as another way to get a new culture,  and since there  is apparently no liquid culture of BRY-97 available at present, I got the Lallemand dry and treated it as I would a liquid pitch. 

S. Cerevisiae believed it was the same strain as WY1272 or WLP051. 

I haven't gotten around to reading some of the new stuff on strain origins that's been floating around.  Has the thinking on this changed?
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Offline Robert

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #16 on: February 27, 2019, 07:37:02 PM »
Removes the potential convenience, but I'm looking at dry yeast simply as another way to get a new culture,  and since there  is apparently no liquid culture of BRY-97 available at present, I got the Lallemand dry and treated it as I would a liquid pitch. 

S. Cerevisiae believed it was the same strain as WY1272 or WLP051. 

I haven't gotten around to reading some of the new stuff on strain origins that's been floating around.  Has the thinking on this changed?
1272 is now placed by at least one study in the Beer 1 clade, near the Whitbread B family (incl. 002, 007, 041, 1332, 1968.)  051 has been proven to be a S. pastorianus strain!  (White Labs now notes this in their catalog.)  And BRY-97 is firmly in the Mixed clade, more or less related to lots of bread yeasts, some distilling yeasts, and Windsor, S-33, Muntons (not Gold, but the one taped onto cans of crap,)  and T-58.  So there's no connection between them.  We do know the provenance of BRY-97 that S. cerevisiae laid out hasn't been challenged,  he showed the accession documentation from Ballantine's ale brewery to Siebel.  But it obviously didn't pass on to become those other two.  Nor can more than one of the 3, if any at all, be Anchor Liberty.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 07:46:14 PM by Robert »
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Offline narcout

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Re: s04 and other fast strains
« Reply #17 on: February 27, 2019, 08:23:27 PM »
1272 is now placed by at least one study in the Beer 1 clade, near the Whitbread B family (incl. 002, 007, 041, 1332, 1968.)  051 has been proven to be a S. pastorianus strain!  (White Labs now notes this in their catalog.)  And BRY-97 is firmly in the Mixed clade, more or less related to lots of bread yeasts, some distilling yeasts, and Windsor, S-33, Muntons (not Gold, but the one taped onto cans of crap,)  and T-58.  So there's no connection between them.  We do know the provenance of BRY-97 that S. cerevisiae laid out hasn't been challenged,  he showed the accession documentation from Ballantine's ale brewery to Siebel.  But it obviously didn't pass on to become those other two.  Nor can more than one of the 3, if any at all, be Anchor Liberty.

Interesting, thanks.

I've not tried BRY-97. WY 1272 is mostly what I use for APA, though I haven't been brewing much of that recently.
There's nothing left to dismantle; the house it just collapsed on itself.  - A. Savage