Author Topic: session grain bill adjustment  (Read 671 times)

Offline Steve Ruch

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #15 on: December 01, 2020, 07:38:13 PM »
You can spend a bunch of hours looking at this sites bitter and mild recipes. It may have what you want, or not. It is fascinating.

http://barclayperkins.blogspot.com/?m=1
British ales are the most satisfying session beers IMO. Agreed this site is awesome.
One lesson that I've learned from brewing some of Ron's recipes is that keeping carbonation on the lower side is benificial for session beers. Higher carbonation tends to a thin mouthfeel.

Ron's 1957 Whitbread IPA recipe is the only "Session IPA" I'll ever brew. It is phenomenal.

I have this beer on my "to do" list and was wondering what yeast you have had the most success with.  I believe the Barclay Perkins website recommends 1099, but I can imagine a whole host of options working here.  Thanks in advance.

Windsor is a good substitute for 1099 (which might be harder to find, much less to keep it fresh).  Or maybe even better, the old Munton's ale yeast.
I use Muntons a lot with good results.
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #16 on: December 01, 2020, 08:03:16 PM »
If you put a recipe in BeerSmith you can tell it to adjust the OG. It will reduce all grains to hit your target OG keeping the relative percentages.  Other software can probably do the same thing.

It will adjust hop additions also. But, I usually do that manually to match the hop profile I want.

Offline Megary

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #17 on: December 01, 2020, 08:58:45 PM »

I have this beer on my "to do" list and was wondering what yeast you have had the most success with.  I believe the Barclay Perkins website recommends 1099, but I can imagine a whole host of options working here.  Thanks in advance.

Windsor is a good substitute for 1099 (which might be harder to find, much less to keep it fresh).  Or maybe even better, the old Munton's ale yeast.

Dave, or anyone, a question regarding Windsor:  What is your experience with clarity using Windsor??  Lallemand describes it as a Low Floc yeast but that wasn't my one and only experience with it.  I won't say I found it to be Hi-floc as I used it in a Porter and who can really tell, but I did find it quick to finish and the fermenter developed a nice pack of sediment at the bottom.  Or maybe I'm just incorrectly equating flocculation with clarity??  Maybe it's more a function of time?

Besides clarity, for the Whitbread IPA I am looking for a malty profile with some helpful fruity esters.

If anyone wants to put a strikethrough across any of these options, please feel free!   :)
WY1099
WY1318
WY1469
WLP002
WLP005
Windsor

I have to eliminate Muntons as I will be ordering from MoreBeer and apparently they don't carry it.

Offline BeerfanOz

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #18 on: December 01, 2020, 09:08:39 PM »
1469 has glorious stone fruit esters that arent overly strong and it finishes dry. Great yeast strain

Offline Andy Farke

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #19 on: December 01, 2020, 09:10:05 PM »
Dave, or anyone, a question regarding Windsor:  What is your experience with clarity using Windsor??  Lallemand describes it as a Low Floc yeast but that wasn't my one and only experience with it.  I won't say I found it to be Hi-floc as I used it in a Porter and who can really tell, but I did find it quick to finish and the fermenter developed a nice pack of sediment at the bottom.  Or maybe I'm just incorrectly equating flocculation with clarity??  Maybe it's more a function of time?

Besides clarity, for the Whitbread IPA I am looking for a malty profile with some helpful fruity esters.

If anyone wants to put a strikethrough across any of these options, please feel free!   :)
WY1099
WY1318
WY1469
WLP002
WLP005
Windsor

I have to eliminate Muntons as I will be ordering from MoreBeer and apparently they don't carry it.

I find that Windsor takes a fair bit of time to clear, so Lallemand's assessment is pretty accurate as compared with my experience. It will drop clear with time and cold, but it takes a few weeks...gelatin or a similar agent would of course hurry that along. Of the ones listed above that I have experience with, WLP002 drops clear like a champ. I've only used WLP005 once, so don't have a lot of comparison. I *can* say that Windsor has some really interesting character, which is less pronounced in WLP002 (a much cleaner yeast in my experience).
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Offline erockrph

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #20 on: December 01, 2020, 09:44:26 PM »
Dave, or anyone, a question regarding Windsor:  What is your experience with clarity using Windsor??  Lallemand describes it as a Low Floc yeast but that wasn't my one and only experience with it.  I won't say I found it to be Hi-floc as I used it in a Porter and who can really tell, but I did find it quick to finish and the fermenter developed a nice pack of sediment at the bottom.  Or maybe I'm just incorrectly equating flocculation with clarity??  Maybe it's more a function of time?

Besides clarity, for the Whitbread IPA I am looking for a malty profile with some helpful fruity esters.

If anyone wants to put a strikethrough across any of these options, please feel free!   :)
WY1099
WY1318
WY1469
WLP002
WLP005
Windsor

I have to eliminate Muntons as I will be ordering from MoreBeer and apparently they don't carry it.

I find that Windsor takes a fair bit of time to clear, so Lallemand's assessment is pretty accurate as compared with my experience. It will drop clear with time and cold, but it takes a few weeks...gelatin or a similar agent would of course hurry that along. Of the ones listed above that I have experience with, WLP002 drops clear like a champ. I've only used WLP005 once, so don't have a lot of comparison. I *can* say that Windsor has some really interesting character, which is less pronounced in WLP002 (a much cleaner yeast in my experience).
I've made variations on the Whitbread IPA with WLP002, Winsor/Notty, and 1469. I think I liked 002 the best, but they were all good beers. I'd use any of them again in the recipe.
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Offline dmtaylor

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #21 on: December 01, 2020, 10:55:00 PM »
Dave, or anyone, a question regarding Windsor:  What is your experience with clarity using Windsor??  Lallemand describes it as a Low Floc yeast but that wasn't my one and only experience with it.  I won't say I found it to be Hi-floc as I used it in a Porter and who can really tell, but I did find it quick to finish and the fermenter developed a nice pack of sediment at the bottom.  Or maybe I'm just incorrectly equating flocculation with clarity??  Maybe it's more a function of time?

I never had a problem with Windsor clearing within a pretty typical 7-10 days, same as many other ale yeasts.  The odd things about Windsor are that it ferments from beginning to end in about 40 hours, and is a bottom fermenting ale strain so you shouldn't expect much krausen at all, kind of odd.  Other than that, and the low attenuation, it makes a great tasting ale, and does NOT result in anything tasting thick or fuller bodied, despite the high FG.

I honestly don't have a lot of experience with the other yeasts, but see no reason to rule any of them out, they are all well liked.
Dave

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Offline Northern_Brewer

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #22 on: December 02, 2020, 12:22:46 AM »
Dave, or anyone, a question regarding Windsor:  What is your experience with clarity using Windsor??  Lallemand describes it as a Low Floc yeast but that wasn't my one and only experience with it.  I won't say I found it to be Hi-floc as I used it in a Porter and who can really tell, but I did find it quick to finish and the fermenter developed a nice pack of sediment at the bottom.  Or maybe I'm just incorrectly equating flocculation with clarity??

Windsor is a good example of a yeast that drops well but doesn't flocculate well, so it can produce a clear beer but it "puffs up" at the slightest disturbance.

It, Munton's ordinary and S-33 are close relatives, apparently all descended from the old EDME homebrew strain.

WY1099
WY1318
WY1469
WLP002
WLP005
Windsor

I have to eliminate Muntons as I will be ordering from MoreBeer and apparently they don't carry it.

Most of those fall into the "all fine, but only you can tell which one is your favourite" category - but I'd probably try 1469 first and 002 last - 002 is forgiving to brew with but kinda boring.

+1 on going easy on the carbonation - too much CO2 wrecks the balance on this kind of beer, as does too much speciality malt. It's almost like the British know what they're doing on this kind of thing....

Offline pete b

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #23 on: December 02, 2020, 01:15:11 AM »
I have all the ingredients for a decent approximation of the Whitbread 1957 ipa recipe and have some pretty fresh 1469 slurry so I think this is going to be my next brew. I figure at that gravity I can even have it on tap in a little more than a week.
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Offline Megary

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Re: session grain bill adjustment
« Reply #24 on: December 02, 2020, 03:42:28 PM »
Some seriously great answers, all of you. Thanks a bunch.  The 1957 Whitbread IPA has been officially added to my brew queue.  If all goes well, maybe I'll split a batch... one with Windsor, one with 1469.

I have all the ingredients for a decent approximation of the Whitbread 1957 ipa recipe and have some pretty fresh 1469 slurry so I think this is going to be my next brew. I figure at that gravity I can even have it on tap in a little more than a week.

I would love to hear how you make out with this.