Author Topic: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles  (Read 844 times)

Offline Alfredbrewer

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #15 on: June 03, 2019, 10:56:17 AM »
Thanks for all of the tips and tricks. Hopefully this helps. I'll let her know all of the feedback and see what she does. I think she was stunned when the first few replies were about sanitation. As brewers we all know that you can never be too clean, but she figured she had a good procedure. Thanks again.

Offline goose

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #16 on: June 03, 2019, 01:16:04 PM »
Goose, dairy products are handy!  I use milkstone remover as my acid cleaner and beerstone remover in all cases, for draught lines, kegs, fermenter...  It's way cheaper than the acid products like 5 Star BS Remover and other acid products available to homebrewers (or pros for that matter) and identical in composition.  And as an acid rinse following alkaline cleaners, way cheaper than SaniClean or the like (but not cheaper than white vinegar I suppose.)  I guess the simple fact is that dairy farmers simply can't and won't pay up like homebrewers are willing to, and you can repackage a product and sell it to someone for as much as they will pay.  Next time I pick up a jug of milkstone remover I'll look at the bulk tank cleaner.  (You can get these things at Tractor Supply, but you do need to go to a store in an area where there are a lot of dairy operations, not every suburban TS will have them.  I go to your Wooster store, Goose.)

Rob, there is also a dairy supply store on the east side of Wooster called Bechtel Supply.  I buy the bulk tank cleaner in a 20 lb. tub and it lasts for quite a while.  It's located on Old Lincolnway (old Rt 30) and is only about three miles from my house!
Goose Steingass
Wooster, OH
Society of Akron Area Zymurgists (SAAZ)
Wayne County Brew Club
Mansfield Brew Club
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Online Robert

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #17 on: June 03, 2019, 01:19:47 PM »
Goose, dairy products are handy!  I use milkstone remover as my acid cleaner and beerstone remover in all cases, for draught lines, kegs, fermenter...  It's way cheaper than the acid products like 5 Star BS Remover and other acid products available to homebrewers (or pros for that matter) and identical in composition.  And as an acid rinse following alkaline cleaners, way cheaper than SaniClean or the like (but not cheaper than white vinegar I suppose.)  I guess the simple fact is that dairy farmers simply can't and won't pay up like homebrewers are willing to, and you can repackage a product and sell it to someone for as much as they will pay.  Next time I pick up a jug of milkstone remover I'll look at the bulk tank cleaner.  (You can get these things at Tractor Supply, but you do need to go to a store in an area where there are a lot of dairy operations, not every suburban TS will have them.  I go to your Wooster store, Goose.)

Rob, there is also a dairy supply store on the east side of Wooster called Bechtel Supply.  I buy the bulk tank cleaner in a 20 lb. tub and it lasts for quite a while.  It's located on Old Lincolnway (old Rt 30) and is only about three miles from my house!
Thanks!  I've always said my top resources for brewing supplies are the restaurant supply (Dean Supply in CLE) and Ace Hardware.   Dairy supply may be joining the list!  Hope John at G&G doesn't feel slighted!
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.

Offline chuskers

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #18 on: June 09, 2019, 09:08:09 PM »
I too have had essentially no carbonation in my last two batches and I’ve never experienced this before. Every now and then I find one that has a little carbonation. I’ve appreciated reading about people’s thoughts on this topic and the possibility of an infection. I’ve not changed my cleaning methods since I started brewing so these have had me puzzled. I rinse my bottles after pouring them to get the leftovers out. Here are two questions I have since I have two batches ready for bottling this weekend: 1) should I use some oxyclean before I clean and sterilize the bottles? 2) has anybody had bad caps?  I’ve noticed when I take the caps off it doesn’t feel like they’re on very good.

During fermentation with these two batches I had to put a blowoff hose on because the fermentation was so active it was filling my air locks. Was this a sign of an infection in the carboys?
« Last Edit: June 09, 2019, 10:00:17 PM by chuskers »

Offline rburrelli

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #19 on: June 09, 2019, 09:49:07 PM »
I too have had essentially no carbonation in my last two batches and I’ve never experienced this before. Every now and then I find one that has a little carbonation. I’ve appreciated reading about people’s thoughts on this topic and the possibility of an infection. I’ve not changed my cleaning methods since I started brewing so these have had me puzzled. I rinse my bottles after pouring them to get the leftovers out. Here are two questions I have since I have two batches ready for bottling this weekend: 1) should I use some oxyclean before I clean and sterilize the bottles? 2) has anybody had bad caps?  I’ve noticed when I take the caps off it doesn’t feel like they’re on very good.

Wing capper or bench capper? I had greater success when I switched to a bench capper.

I think maybe it is a good idea to revisit your cleaning methods.  It could be a cumulative thing from your previous procedures. My procedure is a soaking in brewers wash, rinse and sanitize before bottling.
Just sitting here learning what I can....

Offline chuskers

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #20 on: June 09, 2019, 10:21:59 PM »
I too have had essentially no carbonation in my last two batches and I’ve never experienced this before. Every now and then I find one that has a little carbonation. I’ve appreciated reading about people’s thoughts on this topic and the possibility of an infection. I’ve not changed my cleaning methods since I started brewing so these have had me puzzled. I rinse my bottles after pouring them to get the leftovers out. Here are two questions I have since I have two batches ready for bottling this weekend: 1) should I use some oxyclean before I clean and sterilize the bottles? 2) has anybody had bad caps?  I’ve noticed when I take the caps off it doesn’t feel like they’re on very good.





Wing capper or bench capper? I had greater success when I switched to a bench capper.

I think maybe it is a good idea to revisit your cleaning methods.  It could be a cumulative thing from your previous procedures. My procedure is a soaking in brewers wash, rinse and sanitize before bottling.

Bench capper. I’ve been using Aktiv Brewer Cleaner and soak everything in it for at least 20 minutes and then Move everything to star San for at least 2 minutes, it usually ends up being closer to 5 minutes. I’m wondering if changing up the Cleaner would help, going back to PBW?

Offline chuskers

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #21 on: June 09, 2019, 10:39:17 PM »
As noted, I too had issues with geysers from time to time. We now soak all bottles in Oxyclean before sanitizing. No matter how well you rinse the bottles after use, there is still some stuff left in the bottles. It's the old adage - you can't sanitize crud.

How long do you soak your bottles in Oxyclean and how much do you use?  Also, would it be beneficial to soak all brewing equipment in it?
« Last Edit: June 09, 2019, 10:53:30 PM by chuskers »

Offline Silver_Is_Money

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Re: Inconsistent carbonation in bottles
« Reply #22 on: June 10, 2019, 11:41:33 AM »
I add priming sugar in a medical syringe to each bottle to ensure proper amounts. Mix it with water and boil then cool and calculate th require amount per bottle.

I thought I was the only person who ever did this.  I don't do it all the time though, as I've found that for many of my beers the simple addition of a single Domino Dot suffices for 12 Oz. bottles.

By my scale a Domino Dot (pure cane sugar, per the label) weighs 2.31 grams, and they are amazingly consistent in weight.  If you go by the package they should theoretically weigh 2.291 grams per each.  They are stacked to precision at a count of 198 dots in every 1 Lb. box.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2019, 11:43:16 AM by Silver_Is_Money »