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Author Topic: It's the best beer I have ever made...but why?  (Read 2718 times)

Offline denny

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Re: It's the best beer I have ever made...but why?
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2019, 05:18:13 pm »
There is a distinct color and lovibond difference between Munich malts.  Dark Munich is different than Munich Dark. That could explain some differences I would think, but further experimentation would be needed.

Really?  I don't think I've seen that.  Which maltster(s)?

Bestmalz Munich dark vs Weyerman (or others) dark Munich.

Thanks.  Never noticed that.

Bestmalz Munich Dark target is 11L per their website

Weyermann Munich II target is 8-9.9. 

Slight differences but not significant enough in my opinion


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My thoughts exactly, Paul.
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Offline Robert

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Re: It's the best beer I have ever made...but why?
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2019, 06:23:08 pm »
IDK.  Pilsner with 5% Munich I vs. 5% Munich II shows more noticeable differences in flavor and aroma than in color, IME.   

But then, personally,  I don't like going either route.  I've learned that I prefer to just use a base malt kilned to just north of 2L, to get the desired extra melanoidins.  The lightest (simplest) melanoidins being the subtlest -- so you need base-malt quantities to make an impact -- but also the most pleasant; the darker (more complex) the melanoidins, tending toward N-heterocyclic products, the less stable and desirable. 

A bit of a digression, but it brings me back to the OP:  I find that base malt makes an enormous difference/impact, and attention to it is more rewarding than trying to correct for deficiencies there by adding specialty malts.   In short, I feel for poor Richard and his wallet.  :(  But I'm inclined to think that the Admiral malt was the key. 

That said, it might be worth your effort,  Richard, to try some other base malts, available online or otherwise, which may be more affordable but still a level above the usual commodity brewer's malts.   There's a malt revolution going on, not just with new craft producers, but the old companies are offering new, more craft focused lines also.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2019, 07:03:12 pm by Robert »
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Offline Richard

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Re: It's the best beer I have ever made...but why?
« Reply #17 on: June 04, 2019, 10:22:22 pm »
Yes, I knew it was unscientific when I planned the brew because I changed too many variables and the Munich malts were from different maltsters and, even though the total weight was the same, I knew that adding some light and some dark would bring different character. My previous brew of this style was a year before this one, so it was long gone and comparison is a challenge in that case. Sorry Denny, I can't send you a bottle of each. The new brew had more flavor, with a complex, almost buttery richness that took me by surprise. My sister said "This beer tastes like food".

The more I think about it, the more I am inclined to believe that the base malt is the key. I am now looking at a 3-4 month hiatus in my brewing, which will put me more into stout season than summer beer season. I will spend that time planning my recipes and choosing my malts, and trying too convince my wife that the craft malt is worth the extra expense. I am hoping that one or two more outstanding beers will prove the case and she will agree without forcing me to give up something else in exchange. I guess I should brew one of her favorites to help emphasize the point. Fortunately for the timing, she likes dark beers.
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Offline rburrelli

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Re: It's the best beer I have ever made...but why?
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2019, 06:32:07 am »
There is a distinct color and lovibond difference between Munich malts.  Dark Munich is different than Munich Dark. That could explain some differences I would think, but further experimentation would be needed.

Really?  I don't think I've seen that.  Which maltster(s)?


Bestmalz Munich dark vs Weyerman (or others) dark Munich.

Thanks.  Never noticed that.


Bestmalz Munich Dark target is 11L per their website

Weyermann Munich II target is 8-9.9. 
IDK.  Pilsner with 5% Munich I vs. 5% Munich II shows more noticeable differences in flavor and aroma than in color, IME.   

But then, personally,  I don't like going either route.  I've learned that I prefer to just use a base malt kilned to just north of 2L, to get the desired extra melanoidins.  The lightest (simplest) melanoidins being the subtlest -- so you need base-malt quantities to make an impact -- but also the most pleasant; the darker (more complex) the melanoidins, tending toward N-heterocyclic products, the less stable and desirable. 

A bit of a digression, but it brings me back to the OP:  I find that base malt makes an enormous difference/impact, and attention to it is more rewarding than trying to correct for deficiencies there by adding specialty malts.   In short, I feel for poor Richard and his wallet.  :(  But I'm inclined to think that the Admiral malt was the key. 

That said, it might be worth your effort,  Richard, to try some other base malts, available online or otherwise, which may be more affordable but still a level above the usual commodity brewer's malts.   There's a malt revolution going on, not just with new craft producers, but the old companies are offering new, more craft focused lines also.


Slight differences but not significant enough in my opinion


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My thoughts exactly, Paul.

My apologies gentlemen. I was misreading columns and was mistakenly looking at EBC.
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