Author Topic: Dropping Bright - How to identify  (Read 484 times)

Offline Matt L

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Dropping Bright - How to identify
« on: July 24, 2019, 05:53:41 AM »
What are the most basic signs a beer has dropped bright? Specifically, should I be waiting to see if the beer becomes totally clear? I haven’t seen it get there yet, but most of my beers have been wheat beers if that matters? I usually give all beers a month in the fermenter, but realize that could not matter if the fermentation isn’t complete. Biggest question are what are the physical signs the beer has dropped bright?
Thank you!

Offline BrewBama

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Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #1 on: July 24, 2019, 12:24:09 PM »
They pour a beer into a conical tube and look at solid black lines on a white lit back ground. The more defined the line the clearer the beer.




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« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 11:20:30 AM by BrewBama »
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Offline tommymorris

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #2 on: July 24, 2019, 12:48:20 PM »
What are the most basic signs a beer has dropped bright? Specifically, should I be waiting to see if the beer becomes totally clear? I haven’t seen it get there yet, but most of my beers have been wheat beers if that matters? I usually give all beers a month in the fermenter, but realize that could not matter if the fermentation isn’t complete. Biggest question are what are the physical signs the beer has dropped bright?
Thank you!
I don’t think you need to ferment for a month. I generally ferment 10-14 days. I don’t cold crash and I don’t worry much about clarity before packaging. I keg so the cold crash happens in the keg. I have found the first pint or two are cloudy (I drink all but the grossest pours) but after that the beer is clear.

I use a Big Mouth Bubbler so the fermenter is clear. I can see the yeast has flocculated because the beer looks darker. Even lighter beers look dark in the fermenter because it is concentrated. The yeast is white colored and when there are billions of cells floating around the beer lightens.

Also, generally, when the Krausen drops you can wait 3-7 days and package. I have a Tilt Hydrometer so I am able to confirm fermentation is indeed finished. But, I have only had the Tilt for a few months. For years, I relied on the krausen as my primary guide.

Regarding wheat beers, many of those are supposed to be hazy. So, the yeast you are using may not flocculate much.

Offline scrap iron

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #3 on: July 24, 2019, 12:58:13 PM »
 When beer in the fermenter has a lot of yeast in it still it looks lighter colored. It looks kind of creamy or sort of like cider and when the yeast drops it looks darker. The large amount in the fermenter makes it hard to appear clear so look for color to change darker. I usually leave my beers in the primary for 2-3 weeks and don't transfer to a secondary unless I add fruit. The ferment should be done within a week and add another week+ to for yeast to clean up byproducts. I then cold crash a couple of days and package. With wheat beers the changes maybe less noticeable.
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #4 on: July 24, 2019, 04:27:12 PM »
Here’s a beer from a local brew pub that isn’t clear. Though I prefer clear beer, this is just an example that even the pros don’t fret opaque beer. No head either.




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Offline Robert

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #5 on: July 24, 2019, 04:37:20 PM »


Here’s a beer from a local brew pub that isn’t clear. Though I prefer clear beer, this is just an example that even the pros don’t fret opaque beer. No head either.




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Not to start something again,  but, maybe depends on how you define "pro."    (And what's style-appropriate.)
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Offline denny

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #6 on: July 24, 2019, 04:38:42 PM »


Here’s a beer from a local brew pub that isn’t clear. Though I prefer clear beer, this is just an example that even the pros don’t fret opaque beer. No head either.




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Not to start something again,  but, maybe depends on how you define "pro."    (And what's style-appropriate.)

Which is why I call them "commercial brewers", not "pro"
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Offline Megary

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2019, 04:50:22 PM »


Here’s a beer from a local brew pub that isn’t clear. Though I prefer clear beer, this is just an example that even the pros don’t fret opaque beer. No head either.




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Not to start something again,  but, maybe depends on how you define "pro."    (And what's style-appropriate.)

Which is why I call them "commercial brewers", not "pro"

If that beer tasted good, I would order another and another.  Clarity is not a hang up for me.  Taste is.

Offline EnkAMania

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #8 on: July 24, 2019, 05:43:58 PM »


Here’s a beer from a local brew pub that isn’t clear. Though I prefer clear beer, this is just an example that even the pros don’t fret opaque beer. No head either.




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Not to start something again,  but, maybe depends on how you define "pro."    (And what's style-appropriate.)

Which is why I call them "commercial brewers", not "pro"

If that beer tasted good, I would order another and another.  Clarity is not a hang up for me.  Taste is.

Without the ice, I think it would be very clear.   :)
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Offline BrewBama

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #9 on: July 24, 2019, 05:53:44 PM »
In this case the term ‘pro’ was used to describe someone who brews and sells beer for a living just to point out that some beers are commercially available in an opaque form. It wasn’t necessarily used to describe a master of the craft. In this case, ‘commercial’ may be more appropriate.

This was an Amber Ale. In my opinion a poor example of the style. I didn’t order another. That’s not to say this brewery doesn’t produce other good beers, just that this was not one of my favorites.


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Offline Robert

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Re: Dropping Bright - How to identify
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2019, 05:55:13 PM »


Here’s a beer from a local brew pub that isn’t clear. Though I prefer clear beer, this is just an example that even the pros don’t fret opaque beer. No head either.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Not to start something again,  but, maybe depends on how you define "pro."    (And what's style-appropriate.)

Which is why I call them "commercial brewers", not "pro"

If that beer tasted good, I would order another and another.  Clarity is not a hang up for me.  Taste is.

Without the ice, I think it would be very clear.   :)
Ha!  Indeed, I'll take that one on the right!
Rob Stein
Akron, Ohio

I'd rather have questions I can't answer than answers I can't question.